English Grammar on the Productive System: A Method of Instruction Recently Adopted in Germany and Switzerland : Designed for Schools and Academies

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E.H. Butler & Company, 1857 - English language - 192 pages

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Page 49 - There are three degrees of comparison ; the positive, the comparative, and the superlative.
Page 114 - On some fond breast the parting soul relies, Some pious drops the closing eye requires ; E'en from the tomb the voice of Nature cries, E'en in our ashes live their wonted fires. For thee, who, mindful of th...
Page 184 - Several alterations and additions have been made to the work. The first proposal was essentially different, and inferior to the second.
Page 165 - This is an idiom to which our language is strongly inclined ; it prevails in common conversation, and suits very well with the familiar style in writing : but the placing of the preposition before the relative, is more graceful, as well as more perspicuous, and agrees much, better with the solemn and elevated style.
Page 183 - We cannot indeed have a single image in the fancy that did not make its first entrance through the sight; but we have the power of retaining, altering, and compounding those images, which we have once received, into all the varieties of picture and vision...
Page 182 - He will often argue, that if this part of our trade were well cultivated, we should gain from one nation ; and if another, from another. I...
Page 189 - A divine legislator, uttering his voice from heaven ; an almighty governor, stretching forth his arm to punish or reward ; informing us of perpetual rest prepared hereafter for the righteous, and of indignation and wrath awaiting the wicked : these are the considerations which overawe the world, which support integrity, and check guilt.
Page 166 - The wisest princes need not think it any diminution to their greatness, or derogation to their sufficiency, to rely upon counsel. God himself is not without, but hath made it one of the great names of his blessed Son : The Counsellor. Solomon hath pronounced that in counsel is stability.
Page 115 - KGCAGE, in the proper sense of the word, signifies the expression of our ideas, and their various relations, by certain articulate sounds, which are used as the signs of those ideas and relations.
Page 19 - Lupin was, comforted by the mere voice and presence of such a man; and, though he had merely said 'a verb must agree with its nominative case in number and person...

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