Global Physical Climatology

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Academic Press, Jul 6, 1994 - Science - 411 pages
Global Physical Climatology is an introductory text devoted to the fundamental physical principles and problems of climate sensitivity and change. Addressing some of the most critical issues in climatology, this text features incisive coverage of topics that are central to understanding orbital parameter theory for past climate changes, and for anthropogenic and natural causes of near-future changes--

Key Features
* Covers the physics of climate change
* Examines the nature of the current climate and its previous changes
* Explores the sensitivity of climate and the mechanisms by which humans are likely to produce near-future climate changes
* Provides instructive end-of-chapter exercises and appendices
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction to the Climate System
1
Chapter 2 The Global Energy Balance
18
Chapter 3 Atmospheric Radiative Transfer and Climate
40
Chapter 4 The Energy Balance of the Surface
81
Chapter 5 The Hydrologic Cycle
115
Chapter 6 Atmospheric General Circulation and Climate
136
Chapter 7 The Ocean General Circulation and Climate
171
Chapter 8 History and Evolution of Earths Climate
204
The ClausiusClapeyron Relation
350
The First Law of Thermodynamics Lapese Rate and Potential Temperature
352
Derivation of Simple Radiative Flux Equations
356
Symbol Definitions
360
Système InternationaleSI Units
369
Useful Numerical Values
373
Answers to Selected Exercises
375
Glossary
377

Chapter 9 Climate Sensitivity and Feedback Mechanisms
229
Chapter 10 Global Climate Models
254
Chapter 11 Natural Climate Change
286
Chapter 12 Anthropogenic Climate Change
319
Calculation of Insolation under Current Conditions
347
References
387
Index
399
International Geophysics Series
409
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About the author (1994)

Professor D.L. Hartmann received his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Portland, and his PhD in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics from Princeton University. After postdoctoral appointments at McGill University and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, he joined the faculty of the University of Washington, where he is currently a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, and Senior Fellow of the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean.

Professor Hartmann’s research interests include dynamics of the atmosphere, atmosphere-ocean interaction, climate feedback processes and climate change. His primary areas of expertise are atmospheric dynamics, radiation and remote sensing, and mathematical and statistical techniques for data analysis.

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