Preserving what is Valued: Museums, Conservation, and First Nations

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UBC Press, 2002 - Social Science - 295 pages
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Preserving What Is Valued explores the concept of preserving heritage. It presents the conservation profession’s code of ethics and discusses four significant contexts embedded in museum conservation practice: science, professionalization, museum practice, and the relationship between museums and Native American peoples.

Clavir argues that museum practices are historically grounded and represent values that are not necessarily held by the originators of the objects. She focuses on conservation, explaining the principles and methods conservators practice and discussing First Nations peoples’ perspectives on preservation, quoting extensively from interviews done throughout British Columbia.

 

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Contents

The Historical Development of Conservation and Its Values
3
Conservation Values and Ethics
26
First Nations Perspectives on Preservation and Museums
69
First Nations of British Columbia
98
Personal Perspectives
114
A Comparative Study
217
For What We Do
245
A List of Participants
251
Glossary of Maori Terms
263
Bibliography
271
Index
287
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About the author (2002)

Miriam Clavir is Senior Conservator at the Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia, and an associate of the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, UBC.

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