English Grammar on the Productive System: A Method of Instruction Recently Adopted in Germany and Switzerland : Designed for Schools and Academies

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E.H. Butler & Company, 1859 - English language - 192 pages

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Page 118 - I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib : but Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider.
Page 185 - We cannot indeed have a single image in the fancy that did not make its first entrance through the sight; but we have the power of retaining, altering, and compounding those images which we have once received, into all the varieties of picture and vision...
Page 185 - Lord, I have loved the habitation of thy house : and the place where thine honour dwelleth. 9 O shut not up my soul with the sinners : nor my life with the blood-thirsty; 10 In whose hands is wickedness : and their right hand is full of gifts.
Page 30 - Lupin was, comforted by the mere voice and presence of such a man; and, though he had merely said 'a verb must agree with its nominative case in number and person...
Page 187 - Accent Accent is the laying of a peculiar stress of the voice on a certain letter or syllable in a word, that it may be better heard than the rest, or distinguished from them...
Page 146 - Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken any thing from any man by false accusation, I restore him four-fold. 9 And Jesus said unto him. This day is salvation come to this house, forasmuch as he also is a son of Abraham.
Page 184 - He is acquainted with commerce in all its parts, and will tell you that it is a stupid and barbarous way to extend dominion by arms ; for true power is to be got by arts and industry. He will often argue, that if this part of our trade were well cultivated, we should gain from one nation ; and if another, from another. I have heard him prove, that diligence makes more lasting acquisitions than valour, and that sloth has ruined more nations than the sword. He abounds in several frugal maxims, amongst...
Page 129 - ... all the virtues that have been ever in mankind are to be counted upon a few fingers, but his follies and vices are innumerable, and time adds hourly to the heap.
Page 157 - I intended to have •written," is a very common phrase; the infinitive being in the past time, as well as the verb which it follows. But it is certainly wrong : for how long soever it now is since I thought of writing, " to write" was then present to me, and must still be considered as present, when I bring back that time, and the thoughts of it. It ought, therefore, to be, " The last week I intended to write.
Page 185 - ... it requires few talents to which most men are not born, or at least may not acquire, without any great genius or study.

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