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Fifth Month,)

MAY.

(1880.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. M.

d. h. m.
( Last Quarter i 8 52 A.M. First Quarter 17 5 23 A.M.
New Moon... 9 1 16 A.M. O Full Moon.... 24 1 38 A.M.

Last Quarter 30

5 53 P.M.

Day of the Year. Day of the Month. | Day of the Week.

PHENOMENA.

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Riges. Soutbs Sets. Bigb fide. Low Tide

Apo., ud. 2h.P.M.
A.M.A.M. P.M A.M. A.M. A.M A.M. | P.M. A.M. P.M.
A.m.m. S. W... A. m. h. m. h. m. d. h. m.'h.me

(Per., 24d. ih.P.M. h..he

.. 122 ils 4 59 3 o 566 8 11 28 22 7

10.00 A.M. oho. 123 2 S 4 58 3 13 6 56 I 27 6 57 o 35 23 8

3

54
3 22 5.6

4.16 A.M. I rises. I 24 3

M

4 57 3 19 6 57 I 55 7 43 1 41 24 9 9 39 3 51 4 21 5.4 8.21 P.M. 7* set. 125 4 Tu 4 56 3 25 6 58 2 21 8 28

2 4425 9 56 IO 22 4 48 5 155.3 1.38 P.M. asets. 126 W 4 54 3 30 6 59 2 46 9 11 3 46 26 10 47 11 13 5 41

6

9.18 P.M. 02. 127 6 Th 4 53 3 34 7 0 3 12 9 55 4 48 27 11 37, 6 32 6 56 5.7 9.00 A.M. Óhg. 128

7
F
4 52 3 387 1 3 39 10 39

O o 23 7 19 7 42 5.8 2.11 A.M. Oh. 129 8 S 4 51 3 42 7 2 4 911 25 6 49 29 44

3 8 23 6.0 3.06 P.M. OC. 130 98 4 50 3 457 31 4 44 131 748 o

I 23 I 43 42 9

2 6.2 3.12 A.M. U rises. 131 10 M 4 491 3 47 7 4 5 23 1 2 8 44 1 2 5 2 37 9 24 9 46 10.3 5.00A.M. gr. H. L. S. 132 11 Tu 4 48 3 7 5 6 9 152

9 351 2

2 48 3 11 10 7 10 30 0.4 9.00 P.M. H stat. 133 12 W 4 47 3 50'7 5 6 591 2 41 10 30 3 3 32 3 54 10 51 11 1316.5 3.40 A.N. h rises, 134 13 Th 4 46 3 50 7 6 7 55 3 30 10 59

4 38 11 35 11 57 6.5 7.00A.M. gr. I. LI. 4 45! 3 50 7 8 54 4 17 11 33 5 5 5 21

0 196.4 3.45 A.M.O. 136 15 S 4 44 3 49 7 819 54 5 3 A.M.

6
5 42 6 3 O 40

i 116.3 6.52 P.M. HS.
4 43 3 48 7 9 10 55 5 48 o 31 7

I 22

4.04 A.M. © rises.
M
4 43 3 47 7 10 11 58 6 33 0 31

8
7 11 7 35 2 6

8.00 P.M. OVO. 139 18 Tu 4 42 3 44 7 11 1 2 7 18

0 57 9
8 1 8 30 2 54

3 20 5.6

9 30 P.M. Spica S. 14° 19 W 4.41 3 42 7 12 9 8 5

I 24 10 9 0 9 29 3 49 4 19 5.4 11.00 P.M. Ó 89. 141 20 Th 4 40 3 3 7 13 3 18 8 54 I SINI 9 57 10 27 4 48 5 16 5.3 11.10 P.M. sets. 142 21 F

4 391 3 34 7 14 4 31 9 48 2 21 12 10 59 11 29 5 46 6 18 5.5 11.11 P.M. Capella sets. 4 381 3 30 7 15 5 47110 47 2 57 13

0 1 6 7 205.8 10.06 P.M, Arcturus S. 14423 8 4 37 3 25 7 15 7 4 11 50 3 40 14 0 291 o 57 48 8 16 6.0

2.24 A.M. 24 rises, 14524 M 4 37

3 20 7 16
8 ISI A.M.

4 3275

I 24

I 51 8 43 9 10 6.2 9.03 P.M. Polaris N. 146 25 Tu 4 36 3 1417 1719 19 o 55 5 35 16 2 21 2 50 9 40 10

96.4

3.00 P.N. OHO. 147 26 W 4 36 3 8 7 18 10 u 2 1

6 46 17

3 191 3 46 10 38 11 56.5 7.36 P.M. Antar. rises. 148 27 Th 4 35 3 17 18110 53 3

o 18

4 40 1 33 11 59 6.5 3.31 A.M, rises. 4 35 2 54.7 19 11 28 4 o 9 14 19 5 6 5 30 0 25 6.4 11.00 P.M. Pollus sets. 150 29 S 4 34 2 46 7 20 II 58 4 52 10 25 20 5 53 6 17 O 49

I 12 6.2

5.00 AM, & in ... 151 30 8 4 34 2 38 7 21 A.M. 5 41 11 32 21

7 3 1 36 152 31 M 14 33 2 29 7 22||

1.53 A.M. Vega S. 0 251 6 26 0 37 22 7 26 7 52 2 22 2 45/5.8 2.31 A.M. h rises.

4 16

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PLANETS.

MAY. Mercury () will be visible in the evening (0) MERCURY very near (h) Saturn on the 6th. about March 10, July 6 and November 4; and visible in the morning, April 26, August 22 and December 13.

Prof. E. E. HOLDEN has given, in Harvard Venus ( ) will be morning star until July 13,

College Library Bulletin No. 9, a list of books and evening star for the rest of the year. Y and papers on the transits of Mercury by about does not attain its greatest brilliancy this year.

one hundred and fifty different authors, extendMars ( ) will be visible in the evening until ing from 1631 to 1868, with notes. October 25, and in the morning for the rest of the Venus and Mercury, when seen in the field year.

of the telescope together by Mr. James NaJupiter (21) will be visible in the evening until smyth, appeared to him, the former like bright March 15, when it sets about the time of sunset silver, and the latter like bright zinc, After that it will be seen in the morning before poses this difference to be caused by some unsunrise until the middle of July, when it rises known peculiarity in the surface of Mercury. about midnight. In October it will begin to rise about sunset, and after that will be visible in the evening.

In adversity and difficulties arm yourself with Saturn (k) will accompany Jupiter through firmness and fortitude. the year, being about thirty degrees east in

The firmest friendships have been formed in January. The planets will gradually approach mutual adversity, as iron is most strongly weldeach other until their conjunction in April, 1881.

ed by the fiercest fire.

That which we acquire with the most diffiOTHER observers with the spectroscope have culty we retain the longest; as those who have not yet been able to verify Dr. Draper's dis- carned a fortune are usually more careful of it covery of oxygen in the sun.

than those who have inherited one.

He supout of this township, and it included portions of to the city corporation, Oct. 25, 1701, he says that Rising Sun and Nicetown and Fort St. David's, the city shall extend the limits and bounds" as it afterward called Falls Village. It was traversed is layed out between Delaware and Schuylkill." in a north-western direction by the Ridge av. This charter was in operation until it was superfrom Ninth and Vine sts., and north-eastwardly seded by the events of the Revolution, and ceasfrom the Schuylkill, between Fairmount and ed to be effective after July 4, 1776. For nearly Lemon Hill, by Turner's lane, which ran into thirteen years Philadelphia was governed by the Germantown road, and by Nicetown lane, wardens and commissioners. A new charter was from the Ridge road below the Falls, over to granted by the Legislature March 11, 1789. This Nicetown, Germantown and beyond.

was greatly extended by act of Feb. 2, 1854, Philadelphia city. In "certain conditions and commonly called the Consolidation law, which concessions agreed upon by William Penn, Pro-extended the boundaries of the city over the prietary and governor of the province of Penn- entire county of Philadelphia. sylvania, and those who are the adventurers and Philadelphia county was laid out by William purchasers in the said province, the urth of July, Penn, it is supposed, after his return from New 1681," it was agreed that “ so soon as it pleaseth York, which visit probably took place in Novem. God that the above persons arrive there a certain ber, 1682. On his return, it is said, he estab. quantity of land or ground-plot shall be laid out lished the counties of Chester, Philadelphia and for a large town or city, in the most convenient Bucks. Chester was south and west of Phila. place upon the river for health and navigation." delphia ; Bucks was north and cast. The county On Sept. zo of the same year, William Crispin, of Philadelphia was without boundaries, excep! William Heage, Nathaniel Allen and John Bezer so far as they were limited in the royal grant of were appointed commissioners to lay out" a the province to Penn and by the establishment great town of 10,000 acres. Crispin died dur. of Chester and Bucks counties. Philadelphia ing the passage; Heage, Allen and Bezer are lay between those counties, and extended from supposed to have arrived in the latter part of the the Delaware and the boundaries of Chester year 1681.

From such evidence as is now ex- (now Delaware) county and the southern and tant it is supposed that the site of the great town western boundary of Bucks county to an unwas deterinined upon by them as early as the be- limited extent, and may be said to have embraced ginning of May, 1682. Exactly when the name all the rest of the land in the province except the Philadelphia was applied to this great town can- counties of Bucks and Chester. This great area not be ascertained. One of the earliest surveys was diminished by the establishment of Berks on record, to David Hammond, dated the roth of county, March 11, 1752, and other counties north the fifth month (July), 1682, speaks of the lot and west of Bucks, and by the establishment of being situate on Pool st. (afterward Walnut st.) | Montgomery county, Sept. 10, 1784, which blockin the city of Philadelphia. It is probable that ed off all further claim north of it. about this time the name Philadelphia began to Richmond, sometimes called Port Richmond, be applied to the great town. Penn must have originally the name of a tract of land in the determined upon that name almost as soon as he township of Northern Liberties, adjoining the had obtained the charter for the province and Delaware north of Ball Town and south of Pointcontemplated the settlement of a large town. In no-Point. The name was derived from two his letter to Thomas Lloyd and others, members country-seats in the vicinity -- the Richmond of the Society of Friends, written aboard the property of the Roberts family, lying on the ketch Endeavor, on which he had embarked to Point road near the Delaware, and Richmond return to England, in Aug., 1684, he wrote : Lodge, which in 1808-09 belonged to the Fox " And thou, Philadelphia, the virgin settlement family. It was incorporated as a district on Feb. of this province, named before thou wert born- 27, 1847, under the title of the Commissioners what love, what care, what service and what and Inhabitants of the district of Richmond, in travail hast there been to bring thee forth and the county of Philadelphia." It extended along preserve thee from such as would abuse and de- the Delaware River to a point some distance file thee!" The origin of this name is conjec- north-west of the upper end of Petty's Island ; tural. The reason of Penn for adopting it is not then north-west ncarly to the point where Frank known. It is supposed that he selected it from ford Creek makes its most southerly bend; thence that of a city in Lydia, Asia, the seat of one of south-west to Westmoreland st. ; north-west the seven early Christian churches. (See Rev. along the same to Emerald st.; south west along 1:11; 3:7,9-11.) The signification, " brotherly the latter to a lane running from Frankford turnlove, no doubt commended the name to his pike to Nicetown lane; along Frankford turnpike taste and judgment. The original boundary of to the north boundary of Kensington, and down the city of Philadelphia was between the streets the same to Gunner's Run, and along that stream called Valley (now Vine) and Cedar (now South) to the Delaware River. The area was 1163 sts. Between those boundaries the city extended from the Delaware to the Schuylkill rivers, Southwark-sometimes, but improperly, called and from a map (Thomas Holme's) published the Southern Liberties--was the oldest district in about 1685 in London, it appears that the city the county of Philadelphia. It began to grow much extended three blocks on the west side of the earlier than the northern portions of the county beSchuylkill, to a distance which would now beyond the city bounds. In this increase the section about three squares from Market street bridge. was very much aided by the Swedish settlements For some reason not now known, this design of Wicaco and Moyamensing. This region was was abandoned at an early date, and the western the first which required the attention of the Genlimit of the city was the Schuylkill River. There eral Assembly. By agreement the inhabitants are grants on record for lots on the west side of the had continued some of the principal streets of the Schuylkill“ in the city of Philadelphia," one of city running north and south through their terwhich is dated as late as 1685. In Penn's charter ritory. In regard to the cross streets there was Sixth Month,]

acres.

JUNE.

(1880.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. k. L.
New Moon... 7

4 55 PM

O Full Moon ....22 8 45 A.M. ► First Quarter15 4 51 P.M. (Last Quarter29 4 57 A.M

Day of the Year. | Day of the Month.

Day of the Week

PHENOMENA,

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises 'Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets High Tido.

Low Tide.

(Apo., 7d. 7h. P.M.
A.M.A.M.P.M. A.M.A.M. r.M. A.M. 'P.M. A.M. P.M
h.m. m, s.h.m. h. m. h. m. h. md. h. m.'h. Mih, mh, H

(Per., zidnih. F.M.
153
2 20 7 22 50 7 10 140 23

8
19
8 48 3 11

3 38 5.5 3.58 A.M.P rises.
154
2 W 14 32 2 10 7 23

1 16 7 54 242 24 9 16 9 42 4 7 4 35 5.3 7.00 A.M. O O sap. 155 3 Th 4 32 2 0724 142 8 38 342 25 10

5 I 5 27 5.3: 1.42 P.A. ÓhD

! 156

4
F
4 32 1 50 7 24 2 I 2 9 23

4 43 26 11

I 11 26 5 53 6 20:5.5 10.53 P. M. Ó. 157 5S 4 32 I 40 7 25 2 45 TO 10

5 42 27 11 52

6 45 115.7 10.39 P.M. dsets. 158: 6S

4 31 1 29.7 26 3 22 10 58 6 39 28 O 41 7 36 8 0'59 7-43 P.M. Ó 8. 159 7 M 4 31 1 17 7 26

4
6 11 48 7 31 29

1 I 22 8 20 8 41 6.1U14 P.M. Antares S. 160), 8. Tu 4 31 1 6 7 27 4 55 o 38 8 18 i 1 43 6 9 2 9 25 6.2 9.22 A.M. Ó C. 161 9 W 4 31

O 54 7 28
5 49 I 27 8 59 2 28

2 499 47 IO 8 6.41.52 P.M. H sets. 162 10 Th 4 31

O 42 7 28
6 42 2 14 9 35 3

3 10 3 31 10 29 10 50 6.5 1.10 A.M. 24 rises, 163 11 F 4 31 O 39 7 28

7 47 3

I 10 6 4 3 52 4 12 11 11 11 31 6.5 164 12 S

9.30 P.M. (.
4 31
o 18 7 29 8 48 3 45 10 34 5 4 33 4 53 11 52

16.5 165 13 S

1.47 A.M. h rises, 4 31 5 7 29 9 49 4 29 II Ou

6

5 13 5 33 0 12 o 32 6.4 2.0 AM. (g. H.LY. M 4 31 P.W. 8 7 30 10 51 5 13 11 25 7 5 52 0 13 0 52 I 11 6.2

8.12 A.M. OHO. 167 15 Tu14 31 0 20 7 30 11 55 55811 51 86 34

8

6
57

1 53 5.9 8.31 P.M. Arclerus S.
168 16 W
4 31 O 33 7 30

6 44 A.M. 9

7 49

2 16 2 40 5.8 12,00 P.M. din Aph. 16 17 Th 4 3 0 46 1 3

7 35

8 51 3 8

3 39 5.5 4.03 A.M. & rises.
170 18 F
4 31 0 59 7 31 3 22 8 29

9
26

9 57 4 TO 4 45 5.3! 10.57 P. M. Reg. sets 171 19 S 4 31 T 12 7 31 4 37 9 29 I 29 12 10 33 II

5 52 5 4 10.IO P.M. sets. 172 20 S 4 31 I 25 7 32 5 5 10 32 2 16 13

6 26

7 2 5.7 9.00 P.M. Sum. em. 173 21 M

4 31

1 38 7 32 6 58 U 38 3 12 14 O 16 0471 7 35 174 22 Tu 4 31

9.00 A.M. in c.
1 50 7 32
7 56 A.M.

4 2015
I 14 I 41 8 33 9

o 6.1 8.30 A.M. ( ecl inr.
4 32
3 7 32
8 451 O 43

2 10 2 37 9 29 9 56 6.3 1.47 A.M. Wrises, 176 24 Th 4 32 2 16 7 32

9 24

6 51 17 3 4. 3 29 10 23 10 48 6.5 10.59 P.M. Algen, rises. 177 25 F 4 32 2 28 7 32

9 57 2 41 8 5 18 3 54 4 17 11 13 11 36 6.5 0.27 A.M. 2rises.
178 26 S
4 33 2 41 7 32 10 26 3 32 9 17 19

4 41
5 3

0 6.5 9.06 P.M. Pollaz sets. 179 27 S 4 33 2 53 7 32 10 53 4 21 10 25 20 5 25 5 46 O 22

0 44 6.4 0.51 A.M. h rises. 180 28 M

4 34 3 5 7 32 11 19 5 6 11 321 6 7 6 28 1 5 I 26 6.2 8.41 P.M. Capella sets.
181 29 Tu 4 34
3 17 7 32 11 46 5 51

O 3322
6 50 7 13

2 959111.58 P.M. Vega S.
182
30
W
4 35 3 29 7 32 A.M.

6 36

351231 7 38 8 5 2 321 2 57 5.7 3.33 A.M. Ó 4 C.

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THE EPHEMERIS.

JUNE. The Ephemeris for the present year gives, as (3) Mars near the Moon in the evening of the heretofore, the day of the year, the day of the

uth. month and day of the week, in civil time, according to which the day begins at midnight. MR. J. NORMAN LOCKYER is believed to have Next are given the time of sunrise, the time demonstrated, by means of the spectroscope, before or after noon, at which the sun's centre that calcium and some other substances hith: souths, and the time of sunset. The times of erto regarded as simple are really compound. sunrise and sunset are in each case for the up

Vol. IV. of the Moscow Observatory contains per limb or edge of the sun, corrected for refrac

a series of meridian observations of Mars in option. They are more accurate than usually found position, which, combined with observations in in popular almanacs, and will give the time with the southern hemisphere equally good, will give sufficient accuracy for ordinary purposes. An or- the solar parallax with very small probable error. dinary surveyor's level will givethe horizon where the upper edge of the sun should be at the time given in the almanac. If the telescope of the leveling instrument inverts, the upper edge willy good action than to imitate it!

How much easier do we find it to commend a of course, be apparently the lower one.

Next are given the times of rising, southing and set- A CALUMNIOUS abuse, too often repeated, beting of the moon's centre, and also its age, or comes so familiar to the ear as to lose its effect. the number of days elapsed since new moon, Then follow the times of high and low water for

ABSENCE extinguishes small passions and inPhiladelphia. Lastly is given a collection of in- creases great ones, as the wind will blow out a teresting astronomical phenomena for the year.

candle and blow in a fire.

If a man does not make new acquaintances as MR. HENRY BESSEMER has given in Nature, he advances through life, he will soon find himJan. 24, 1878, a plan for figuring and mounting self left alone. A man should keep his friendlarge glass reflectors for the telescope,

ship in constant repair,

a

tween.

not always as much unanimity, and for the want line. By this addition the size of Spring Garden of such regulations the inhabitants applied to the was more than doubled. At the time of Con. Assembly by petition. On May 14, 1762, an act solidation the area of the district was estimated was passed to create a municipality in the south- to be 1100 acres. There are two theories as to ern suburbs to be called the district of South- the origin of the name. One is, that it is derived wark. The bounds commenced on Cedar st. at from Spring Garden, the name of a country-scat the Delaware, and proceeded thence west to in that neighborhood, which in the year 1723 Passyunk road; along the latter to Moyamen- belonged to, and was for sale by, Dr. Francis sing road ; thence by Keeler's lane to Greenwich Gan louet. A better suggestion is, that it was deroad; thence to the river Delaware, and along rived from the Spring Gardens, an old - estabthe several courses of the same to the place of lished place of resort in London. beginning. The officers of the corporation were Tacony, Toaconing or Toaconick, a small three assessors and three supervisors, who jointly township laid down on Holme's map of 1633-84, had a right to lay taxes for repairing and cleaning situate in the bend between the river Delaware, streets, and three surveyors and regulators to Wissonoming Creek on the north-east, and Frankregulate the courses of streets, etc. and lay down ford Creek and Little Tacony Creek on the south gutters and conduits. The events of the Revo- and west. It lay cast of the town of Frankford, lution were held to supersede this charter in the and at an early date was incorporated in Oxford same manner as the city charter was supposed to township. The name was derived from Tekene; be nullified. On Sept. 29, 1787, the Gencral As- and mcans “ wood” or“ an uninhabited place." sembly passed an act to appoint commissioners West Philadelphia, in the township of Blockto lay out the district of Southwark, marking out ley and west of the Schuylkill River, was created the courses of the principal streets, not only in a borough on Feb. 17, 1844, and embraced Hamthat district, but also in Moyamensing and Pas: ilton and Mantua villages and the ground besyunk. This was preparatory to the passage of

On April 3, 1851, its title was changed an act of April 19, 1794, which erected a full cor- to the district of West Philadelphia, and its poration under the title of “the Commissioners boundaries considerably enlarged. and Inhabitants of the district of Southwark.' White Hall, north-west of Bridesburg, extendThey laid out a large number of strects, and ing from the United States Arsenal westward, most of their plans were confirmed by the contained in the bend made by Frankford Creek Supreme Executive Council in 1790. The great- and Little Tacony, and adjoining Frankford. It est dimensions were 1% miles in length by 1% was situate in the old township of Tacony and in breadth; area, 760 acres. The name was The later township of the Northern Liberties. It parıly adopted in allusion to the situation of the was incorporated into a borough on April 9, 1849. district south of the city of Philadelphia, but it was also adopted from the name of a borough in the county of Surrey, England, immediately op

ELECTIONS IN 1880. posite the city of London, and for many years IN 1880 general elections will be held in the city considered a portion of that metropolis.

of Philadelphia as follows : Spring Garden appears on Varle's map of For city and ward officers, on Tuesday, Feb. 1796 as a small settlement between Vine st. and ruary 17th. To be clected : Receiver of Taxes, Buttonwood lane and a point on a line with City Solicitor, Magistrates, members of Councils, Seventh st. (then unopened), and extending as far Assessors, election officers, School Directors, etc. west as the Ridge road. There was a street Last day for payment of taxes, January 17th. (now known as Franklin st.) which ran north Last day for naiuralization, January 17th. from Vine st. across Callowhill, and stopped op- For Federal, State and county officers, on Tuesposite a house halfway between Callowhill st. day, November 2d. To be elected : Electors of and Buttonwood lane. The street now known as President and Vice-President of the United States, Eighth st. (then called Garden st.) ran through members of Congress, Justice of Supreme Court the centre of the district, and the street now of Pennsylvania, Auditor - General, Judge of called Garden st. (then known as Spring st.) ran Court of Common Plcas No 3, State Senators in from Vine to Buttonwood. Charles st. ran from odd-numbered districts, Representatives in GenCallowhill to Buttonwood. The district was in- eral Assembly, District Attorney, Coroner, Clerk corporated March 22, 1813, as “the Commis- of Quarter Sessions, City Controller, sioners and Inhabitants of the district of Spring Last days for extra assessment, September ist Garden." The original boundaries were Vine st. and ad. on the south; the middle of Hickory lane (after- Last day for payment of taxes, October 2d. ward Coates st., now Fairmount av.) on the Last day for naturalization, October 2d. north; Broad st, on the west, and the middle of Sixth st. on the cast. On March 21, 1827, the

QUALIFICATIONS OF ELECTORS. district was enlarged by adding that part of VOTING ON AGE.-Every male citizen between Penn township beginning at the middle of the ages of twenty-one and twenty-two years may Sixth st. to a point 210 feet north of the north vote without being assessed. He must previously side of Poplar lane; thence north-west, parallel have resided in the State one year, and in the to the lane, at a distance of 200 feet from the lat. election district (or division) where he offers to ter, to the middle of Broad st; thence parallel vote for at least two months before the election. with Vine street to the river Schuylkill. The If his name is not on the registry of voters, he meaning of this was, that whilst the upper bound- must make affidavit, if a native citizen, as to his ary of the district took a course from Sixth st. west birthplace and residence in the district for two by north to Broad st., the line beyond the latter ran months, and in the State for one year, except in due cast and west to the Schuylkill. It extended case he had been a resident and removed there. by the course of that river to Vine st., and along from and again returned, when six months' resithe latter to Broad, where it met the old district dence will be sufficient. If he is not native born, Seventh Month,]

JULY.

(1880.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. h. m.
New Moon... 7 8 21 A.M. O Full Moon ...,21 4 2 P.M.
First Quarter 15 I 15 A.M. (Last Quarter28 6 40 P.M.

PHENOMENA.

| Day of the Year.

Day of the Month. Day of the Week.

3 36 25

1

2

316.5

192 IOS 193 11 S

THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets. High Tide. Low Tide.

(Apo., 4d.11h, P.M.
A.M.P.M. P.M. A.M.A.M. P.M. A.M. | P.M. A.M. P.M.
i.m.m. s.'h...'h. m. h. m. h. m. I. h. m. h. m. n. m

(Per., 200, 6h. A.M.

A. IN. 1831 Th 4 35 3 4 32 o 14 7 21

2 36 24

8

34 9 3 3 24 3 53 5.5 0.09 A.M. Óhe. 184 2 F 4 36 3 52 7 32

0 46 8
7

9 31 10 o 4 22 4 505.3 6.14 A.M. ÓWC. 185

3
S
4 37 4 3 7 32 I 22

8 55 4 33

26

IO 28 to 58 5 19 5 47 5.4 9.39 P.M. o sets. 186 48 4 37 4 14 7 31 2 31 9 44 5 27 27 11 24 11 51 6 17 6 435.6 9.29 P.M. Antar. S. 187 5 M 4 38 4 24 7 31 2 51 10 34 6 16 28

O 17 7 10 7 36 5.9 9.00 P.M. S sets. 188. 6 Tu 4 38 4 34 7 31 3 44 11 23 6 59 29

O 41 1 2 8

o 8 216.1 3.00 A.M. & gr. el. L
189' 7W
4 39 4 44 7 31 4 41
O 12 7 36 I 22 I 42 8 41

9
16.2

5:42 A.M. O eel. in.
190
8 Th 4 39 4 53 7 30
5 40 o 59 8 9

4 2 25 9 23 9 44

6

+ 11.35 P.M. Pomal rises, 1919

F
14 405 2 7 30
6 41 I 44 8 38 2

2 44 3 410 3 10 23 6.5 6.42 P.M.
4 41 5 10 7 30

7 42
2 28 9 5 3
3 24 3 44 10 43 II

2.59 P.M. .
4 41 5

18

7 29 8 44 3 12' 9 304 4 3 4 22 11 22 11 41 6.5 3.57 P.M. OHG. 194 12 M 4 42

5 26 7 29
9 47 3 56
9 55 4 42 5 2

0 1 6.4 11.21 P.M. 2 rises, 195 13

Tu
4 43 5 33 7 28 10 51

6

4 41 10 22 5 22 543 O 21 O 41163 7.00 P.M. OSO sup. 196 14 W

5 39 7 28 11 57 5 28 10 51 76 4 6 27 I 2 1 23.6.2 11.43 P.M. h rises. 197 15 Th 4 44 5 45 7 27 1 6

6 19 11 25

8

7 19 46 2 115.9 10.56 P.M. Vega S. 198 16 F 4 45' 5 51 7 26

7 15 AM 9 17 51 8 26 2 38 3 10 5.6 6.00 P.M. Qin Aph. 199 17 S 4 46 5 56 7 26 3 29 8 15 o 6 IO

9

4! 9 41 3 45! 4 235.4 11.59 P.M. Altair S. 20 18 S 4 47 6 0 7 25! 4 38 9

18

O 57 11 10 17 10 565 0 5 36 5.4 9.04 P.M., sets.
M

4 7 25
5 40 10 22

1 57 12 11 31 6 15 6 50/5.6 10.53 P.M. Spi, sets.
202 20 Tu 4 48 6
7 7 24 6 33 11 25 3

O 5 0 36 7 24 7 55 5.9 8.30 PM 0 2 6. 203 21 W 4 49

7 17 A.M. 4 22 141 3 I 28 8 22 8 47 6.2 9.13 P.M. Algen. rises. 204 22 Th 4 501 6 12 7 22

7 53 0 24 5 39 15 I 53 2 18 9 12 9 37 6.4 11.00 A.M. stat. 205 23 F

6 14 7 21
8 25

6 54
16
2 42 3

1 10 24 6.5 10.55 P.M, Capel. rises. 206 24 S 4 52

6 15.7 20
8 53 2 10 8 5.17

3 27 3 48 10 46'11 76.511.00 P.M. 9 in Per.
207 25 S
4 53 6 15.7 19 9 20

2 58 913

18

4 10 4 31 11 29 11 506.5 8.33 P.M. Reg. sets. 208 26 M 4 54 9 47 3 45 10 19 19

4 52 5 13

0 11 6.4 10.29 P.M. 4 rises. 209 27 Tu 4 55 6 14 7 18 10 15

4 30 II 23:20

5 34 5 54 o 32 0 53 6.3 3.14 P.M. (. 4 55 6 13 7 17 10 46 5 16 0 26 21

6 16 6 38 I 13

1 35 6.0

9.49 A.M. Óhe. 21129 Th 4 56 6 11 7 16 11 21 6 3

7 7 28 1 57 2 21 5.9 2.06 P.M. OC. 212 30 F

4 57

6

9 7 15 A.M. 6 51 2 26 231 7 56 8 26 2 47 315 5.6 1.34 P.M. 7* rise. 21331 S

7 39 3 21:24 | 857 9 28 3 45 4 16 5.4 10.38 P.m. h rises.

6 52

2 18

201 19

4 47 6

713

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JULY.

We ask advice, but we mean approbation. (0) MERCURY a little north of the Moon in A MISER grows rich by seeming poor; an exthe evening of the gth.

travagant man grows poor by seeming rich.

Our alarms are much more numerous than our COMMANDER F. M. GREEN, U. S. N., has de dangers, and we suffer much oftener in apprehentermined by telegraph the longitude of various

sion than in reality. stations in South America in connection with The art of using moderate abilities to advan. Lisbon.

tage wins praise, and often acquires more reputaIt appears from a discussion of the photo- tion than real brilliancy. graphs taken of the sun during the transit of The conqueror is regarded with awe, the wise Venus that the photographic diameter of the sun man commands our esteem, but it is the benevois of no value when accuracy is required.

lent man who wins our affection, DR. SCHRADER, in Hungary, has published a Atheism is the result of ignorance and pride; catalogue and maps of all the stars from first to of strong sense and feeble reasons ; of good eatfifth magnitude, inclusive, visible in northern ing and ill-living. It is the plague of society, latitudes. In these maps the brightness of the the corrupter of manners and the underminer stars is indicated by the size of the spots repre- of property. senting the stars.

There is scarcely a single joy or sorrow withOut of six thousand nebulæ known, about one in the experience of our fellow-creatures which hundred and fifty have been examined with the we have not tasted, yet the belief in the good spectroscope.

About one-fourth of these appear, and beautiful has never forsaken us. It has from the lines observed, to be gaseous nebula, been medicine in sickness, richness in poverty, generally with regular outlines, but sometimes and the best part of all that ever delighted us in irregular in outline.

health and success.

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