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First Month,]

JANUARY

(1876.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. h. m.
First Quarter 4 10 23 A.M. ( Last Quarter 18 3 48 A.M.
O Full Moon... 11 I 22 A.M.

New Moon... 26 8 41 A.M.

Day of the Year. | Day of the Month. | Day of the Wook.

PHENOMENA.

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets. High Tide. Low Tide.

(Per., 9d. uh. P.M.
A.M. P.M. P.M. A.M.P.M. P.M. A.M. P.M. A.M. P M.
h.m. m. s.h.m.. m. A. m. h. i. d. h. m. h. m. h. m. h. m.

(Apo., 22d. 4h. A.M. 7 23 3 454 45 10 28 3 57 9 34 5 4 44 5 4

O 3 6.4 6.39 P,Msets. 7 23 4 13 4 46 10 53 4 40 10 37 6 5 24 5 43

023

O 43 6.3 2.34 P.M. O. M

7 23 4 41 4 46 11 II 5 23 11 46 7 6 2 6 24 1 1 I 21 6.1 10.23 P.M. sets. 4 7 23 5 8 4 4711 33 6 8 A.M. 8

1 43
2 55.9

3:37 A.M. 24 rises.
W
9 23 5 36 4 48 11 58 6 57 559 7 35 8 3

2 54 5.0 6.10 P.M.CO Th 7 23 6 2 4 49 o 26 7 50 2 7 10 8 38 9 10

3 22 3.57 5.4 7.54 P.M.

h sets, 9 23 6 28 4 50 I 3 8 49 3 23 11

9 47 10 21 4 29 565.4

6.48 P.M. U south. 7 23 6 54 4 51 1 501 9 53 4 44 12 11 O1 36 5 40 6 19 5.7

0 gr. Hel.

Lat. S. 7 23 7 19 4 52 2 50 11 I

6 2 13
O 11 6 55 7 30 5.8

2.15 A.M. H s. 1010

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8

7 10 14 O 42 I II 8 18 30 6.1 7. 1 P.M. & sets, IIII 7 23 8 8 4 54 5 23 I 10 8

2 8 8 58 9 27 6.3stat. 12 12

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2 7 8 46 16 2 35 3 0 9 54 10 19 6.5 10. 07 P.M. OHO. 13 13

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8 544 567 59 2 581 9 19 171 3 25 3 48 10 44 11 716.5 10.20 P.M. d sets, 14 14 F

7 22
9 16 4 57 9 10 3 45 9 46 18

4 11 4 32 11 30 11 51 6.5 3.07 A.M. 24 rises. 15 15 9 37 4 58 10 18 4 29 10 9.19 4 53 5 14

O 12 6.4 11.00 P.M. Sir, south, 16 16 S

7 21 9 58 5 O11 22 5 12 10 30 20 5 34 5 52 O 33 o 536.2 7.20 P.M. h sels. 17 17

M
7 20 10 18 5
A.M. 5 54 10 52 21 6 12 6 33 I II I 31 6.1

3.17 A.M. Oh. 18 18 Tu 7 20 10 38 5 2 0 26 6 38 II 14 22

1 52
2 1315.8

7.49 P.M. 7 * S. 19 19

W
7 19 10 575 3 I 29 7 23 11 3923

2 36 2 59 5.6 9.12 P. M. Capella N,
Th
7 19 11 15 5 4 2 33 8 10

7 24

3 28 3 55 5.4 5.35 P.M. O 4 . 21 21

F
7 18 11 32 5 5 3 35 90 O 42 25

9 37 10

6

4 251 4 56 5.3 7.28 P.M. sets. 22 22 7 17 11 49 5 6 4 35 9 52 I 23 26 10 35 11 5 5 25

5 54 5.5 9.01 P.M. Rig. S. 7 17 12

415 8 5 31 10 44 2 13 27 11 35 6 24 6 54 5.8 10.18 P.M. asets. 24 24

M
7 10 12 195 9 6 21 11 35 3 9 28 2

o 26 7 21

745 5.9 2.35 A.M. 4 rises. 25 25

Tu

7 15 12 34 5 10 7 3 P.M. 4 II 22 O 49 I 12 8 8 8 31 6.1 11.16 P.M. Procy. S. 26 26 W 7 15 12 47 5 11 7 38 o 24 5 17:30 I 32 I 54 8 51 9 13 6.3 6.41 P.M. & sets. 27 27 Th 7 1413 05 13 8

7 III 6 22 1

2 15 2 36 9 34 9 55 6.4 9.05 P.M. Ó Su. 28 28 F 7 13 13 12 5 14

8

32 1 56 7 28 2 55 3 15 10 14 10 34 6.5 3.54 P.M. Ó & h. 7 12 13 23 5 15 8 55 2 39 8 33 3 3 34

3 54 10 53 11 13 6.5 0,27 AM. Ở o C. 30 30 7 11 13 33 5 169 16 3 22 9 39 4 4 13 4 32 11 32 11 51 6.5 6.33 p.m. h sets. 31 31 M 7 10 13 4215 17 9 38 4 7 10 46 5 4 52 5 131

O II 8.56 P.M. oc, e Pis,
ASTRONOMICAL INFORMATION, Etc.
Chronological Cycles.

Abbreviations.
Dominical Letter.....

B, A
2 Ascending node.

O Degrees.
Epact...

4

Minutes of arc. Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number.....

15
O Descending node.

h. Hours. Solar Cycle......

9
N. North. S, South.

m. Minutes of time. Roman Indiction.

4 E. East. W. West. s. Seconds of time, Julian Period

6589 Signs of the Planets.

JANUARY O The Sun.

Mars.

Mars close north of the Moon Jan. 2. The Moon.

24 Jupiter.

Jupiter 5° Mercury.

h Saturn.

Saturn 20
Venus.

or Hi Uranus.
Venus close "

28. or $ Thc Earth.

U Neptune.
Mars 1° south

31. Signs of the Zodiac. p Aries.

A Libra.

POPULATION OF THE WORLD. 8 Taurus.

m Scorpio.

Behm and Wagner's estimate of population for D Gemini.

Sagittarius.

1874 is as follows: Cancer.

Capricornus. 22 Leo.

Aquarius.
Europe

302,973,000 Virgo.

# Pisces.
Asia.

798,907,000
Africa
Aspects.

206,007,000 America....

84,392,000 Conjunction, having the same) Longitude or Australia and Polynesia o Quadrature, differing 90° in

4,563,000 Right AsOpposition, differing 180° in I cension,

Total..... 1,396,842,000

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THE DECLARATION OF INDEPEND

organization of armies and the authorization of ENCE, JULY 4, 1776.

hostilities the members of Congress regarded as

near as might be under the circumstances the How IT CAME TO BE ADOPTED.

spirit of their instructions. The First Continental Congress, which met at Connecticut appointed her delegates on the 3d Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, on the 5th of of November, 1774. “ to join, consult and advise September, 1774, was convened for purposes of with the other colonies in British America on consultation only. Its members assembled to- proper measures for advancing the best good of gether in alarm, unresolved as to what should be the colonies." To join in proper measures was done, viewing each new encroachment of the

the greatest extent of this authority, and whether British ministry as an addition to evils which the words were sufficient license for acts of war were already intolerable. Twelve colonies were may well be questioned. Massachusetts Bay, represented by delegates in that assembly. Gcor- through her provincial convention, having sufgia was not represented. Protests only were the fered most by British oppression, was boldest in weapons by which these representatives hoped to the commission to her delegates, who were chosen avert the calamities which impended. The king on the 5th of December, 1774. They were granted was loyally and humbly addressed. The people “full power with the delegates of the other coloof Great Britain were besought to use their influ- nies to concert, agree upon, direct and order such ence to prevent the injustice and injury which further measures as to them shall appear best calwould result from the execution of the acts of culated for the recovery and establishment of Parliament hostile to America. Resistance was American rights and liberties, and for restoring not determined upon further than by declaration harmony between Great Britain and the colonies. that no obedience was due from the province of Maryland, by convention of deputies, on the Massachusetts Bay" to the late cruel, unjust and 12th of September, 1774, gave to her delegates in oppressive acts of the British Parliament; but Congress power “to consult and agree to all meathat they should be rejected as the attempt of a sures which such Congress shall deem necessary wicked administration. A resolution against the and effectual to obtain a redress of American importation, use or purchase of British goods after grievances. And this province bind themselves the ist of December, 1775, and a determination to execute to the utmost of their power all resoluthat all exports from the American colonies to tions which the said Congress may adopt.". This Great Britain and the British West Indies should was an unlimited authority, subject only to the decease on the ist of September, 1775, unless the termination of other colonies. grievances complained of were removed, were the Pennsylvania, by vote of her assembly, elected most aggressive acts of this conference. On the her delegates September 15, 1774, with direction 26th of October the Congress adjourned, recom. merely that they should attend the Congress, and mending to the people of the American colonies with no instruction as to what they should do. that another Congress should be held in Philadel- South Carolina, on the inth of January, 1775, phia on the icth of May, 1775, unless the Ameri- in provincial convention, chose her delegates can colonies should be sooner relieved of their “ with full power to concert, agree upon, direct grievances.

and order such further measures as in the opinion The hope under which the first Congress ad- of the said deputies and the delegates of the other journed was illusory. There was no disposition American colonies to be assembled shall appear in the British ministry or in the Parliament to necessary for the recovery and establishment of allow the complaints of the Americans to disturb American rights and liberties, and for restoring the policy of the administration. The second harmony between Great Britain and the colonies." Congress met at the State-house in Philadelphia The commons house of assembly of South Caroon the 10th of May, 1775. The delegates to this lina ratified these appointments on the 3d of Febassembly came together under circumstances ruary, “ with full power and authority to concert, varying in regard to the amount of authority agree to and effectually prosecute such measures which they held. Some were elected by the pro- as in the opinion of the said deputies and of the vincial assemblies and represented the established deputies to be assembled shall be most likely to colonial governments, some were sent by popular obtain redress of American grievances.' conferences and conventions which had been held New Jersey appointed her delegates on the 24th in defiance of the wishes of the colonial authori- of January, 1775, by the assembly, without inties, who were not in sympathy with American structions, except to report what had been done. feeling. Under the circumstances the delegates New Hampshire, by convention, on the 25th of were justified in acting with extreme caution. January, 1775, gave to her delegates “full and Those who were sent by the colonial assemblies ample power in behalf of this province to consent dared not act further than express authority and agree to all measures which said Congress seemed to allo Those who were sent by the shall deem necessary to obtain redress of Ameripeople were even less justified in assuming a broad can grievances. license, and they were compelled by the circum- The lower counties on the Delaware (now the Stances which brought them together to act with State of Delaware), by resolution of the assembly, discretion, which might seem to many to be timid- 16th of March, 1775, gave to her delegates power ity. The delegates were governed, therefore, very "to concert and agree upon such further measures strictly by their instructions; and although the as shall appear to them best calculated for the acbattles of Lexington and Concord had been fought commodation of the unhappy differences between before the Congress assembled, the members con- Great Britain and her colonies on a constitutional fined themselves strictly to the authorization of foundation, which the house most ardently wish measures of defence against the tyrannical outrages of the Crown. In doing this much they Virginia elected her delegates March 20, 1775, might have exceeded the limit of their instructions. without instruction. But the actual necessity controlled. Even in the North Carolina, April 5, 1775, by convention,

for."

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(Per., 7d. 4h. A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.

A.M.
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P.M. A.M. P.M.

(Apo., 18d. 11h. P.M. him. m. s.h.m. h. m. h. m. h. m. d. h. m. h. 1. h. 1. h. m. 32 1 Tu 7 10 13 50 5 19 10 1 4 53 II 56 6

5 34 5 54 0 32

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17 8 55 2 59 3 36 5.4 10.13 P.M. sets. 36 5 S

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4 14 24 5 26 2 54 10 51 5 51 12

3 6 481 7 22 5.8 2.30 A.M. Ono. 39 8 Tu 3

2 14 26 5 27 4 13 11 506 38 13 O 33 o 59 7 52 8 18 6.1 6.03 P.M. h sets. 7 1 14 28 5 28

5 31 044 7 14 14 I 24 1 47 8 43 9 6 6.3 7.05 A.M. Ó HC. 7 0 14 29 5 29

6 46 33 7 44 15 2 II 2 34 9 30 9 53 6.4 8.14 P.M. sets. 6 59 14 30 5 31 7 58 2 19 8

2 55 3 17 10 14 10 36 6.5 gr. Hel. Lat. N. 6 58 14 29 5 32 9 4 3 4

3 36 3 55 10 55 11 14 6.5 11.59 P.M. OS O inf. 6 57 14 28 5 33 10 10 3 478 53:18 4 14 4 35 11 33 11 54 6.5 11.47 P.M. Hi south. 45 14 M 6 55 14 26 5 34 11 15 4 311 9 15 19 4 55 5 15 0 14 6.4 10.10 P.M. dsets. 46 15 Tu 6 54 14 23 5 35 A.M. 5 16 9 39 20 5 35 5 56 O 34 O 54 6.2 1.21 A.M. 4 rises. 47 16 W 6 53 14 20 5 37 20 6

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6
17

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3 19 5.5 4.04 P.M. W south. 6 49 14 55 40

3 23

36 o

4 24 9 41 9 37 3 51 4 23 5.3 11.00 P.M. *0240. 6 48 13 59 5 41

4 15 9 27 0 58 25 10 7.10 38 4 56 5 26 5.4 8.36 P.M. dsels. 52 21 M 6 46 13 53 5 42 5 0 10 17 1 59 26 11 6 11 35 5 57 6 25 5.7 7. 2 P.M. Capella N. 53 22 Tu 6 45 13 45 5 43 38 11

6 3 3 27

1 6 54 720 5.8 10.07 P. M. sets. 54 23 W 6 43 13 37 5 45 9 11 52 4 9 28 O 24 O 47 7 43

8 6 6.0 6.28 A.M.O.O. 55 24 Th 6 42 13 29 5 46 6 36 P.M.

1 7
1 25 8 26 8

44

6.2 56 25 F 6 40 13 19 5 47

6 59 0 36 6 23

1 45

5 9 4 9 24 6.3 5. 7 P.M. W stat. 6 39 13 9 5 48

1 20
7 29 2 25 2 43 9 44 10

0.41 A.M. 4 rises. 58 27 S

6 37 12 59 5 49 743 2 5 8 37 3 3 3 22 10 22 10 41 6.5 9.04 P.M. Procyon S. 59 28 M 6 36 12 48 5 50

8 6 2 51 947

3 3 43 4 3.11 2 11 22 6.5 2.00 A.M. B Scor. oc by 6029 Tu 6 34 12 37 5 51 8 31 3 40 11 1 4 4

26

4 48 11 45 6.4 6.05 A.M. DCC. Fixed and Movable Feasts, Fasts, etc., 1876. The Public Ledger of Philadelphia, it is beEpiphany....

Jan. 6 lieved, has now the largest circulation of any daily

paper in the United States, with perhaps one exValentine's Day.

Feb. 14 ception, and for the accommodation of its adverShrove Tuesday.

29 tisers, and to give a reasonable amount of reading Ash Wednesday.

Mar. 1

marter, issues every Wednesday and Saturday &

supplement. As an evidence of the amount of St. Patrick's Day.

17 its business, nearly two thousand advertisements Palm Sunday....

Apr. 9

were handed in at its counter on Saturday last Maundy Thursday.

13

for publication, being a larger number by far than ........................... Good Friday..

were ever offered in one day to any other Phila

14 | delphia paper. The daily circulation of the Led. Easter Sunday..

16 ger is now 92,000, with a steady increase. Whitsunday

June 4

The increasing demands upon its columns show

that the public fully appreciate its advantages Trinity Sunday .............

and cheapness as an advertising medium. At an St. John the Baptist's Day...

estimate of five persons in each family reading All Saints' Day.

Nov.

the Ledger, an advertisement is brought to bear AU Souls' Day.

upon the minds of over 460,000 persons. It has 2

always been a very desirable and appreciable Advent Sunday.

Dec. 3 paper to the citizens of Philadelphia, and it Christmas Day..

reaches and is read by all classes, bringing to 25

them a vast amount of valuable and well-ascer. St. John the Evangelist's Day.............." 27 tained matters of fact and news. Its great sucFEBRUARY

cess is traceable to the fact of the genuineness and

character of its reading matter. It is really the Jupiter 60 north of the Moon Feb. 17. model newspaper of its day and age, but it has Saturn 10

24. required a vast deal of labor and patience to acVenus 2° south

28. complish this great work.-Daily News, West Mars

29. Chester, Pa., April 16, 1875.

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The as

gave her delegates “such powers as may make ten in favor of independence until, on the 15th of any acts done by them or by any of them, or con- | January, 1776, Robert Bell, bookseller, in Third seni given on behalf of this province, obligatory on street, Philadelphia, issued the first copies of an honor upon every inhabitant thereof."

anonymous pamphlet, entitled “ Common Sense." sembly of that province ratified the nominations It was an argument in favor of independence of two days afterward.

the control of Great Britain. It was well writNew York, by provincial convention, April ten and plausible, and it struck a keynote to the 22d, three days after the battle of Lexington, news thoughts of every patriot. Several editions of this of which had already been received, appointed publication were issued, and the author was soon delegates “to concert and determine upon such found to be Thomas Paine, an Englishman, who measures as shall be judged most effectual for the had been in America scarcely more than a year. preservation and re-establishment of American " Common Sense" was replied to by “ Plain rights and restoration of harmony between Great Truth” and many other pamphlets, and sudBritain and the colonies.

denly this question of independence became paraRhode Island and Providence Plantations, by mount throughout America. The delegates in vote of assembly, on the 7th of May, instructed the Congress were still under the control of ihe caudelegates to consult with delegates of other colo- tious instructions which had been passed by the nies “ upon proper measures to obtain a repeal of appointing authorities generally months before. the several acts of the British Parliament for levy. After Common Sense was published, New ing taxes upon His Majesty's subjects in America Jersey elected her delegates on the 14th of Febwithout their consent; also to consult upon ruary, but gave them no new instructions. proper measures to establish the rights and lib- The house of representatives of the lower counerties of the colonies upon a just and properties on Delaware, on the 22d of March, instructed foundation."

their delegates to embrace every opportunity to Georgia, which had no delegates in the first effect a reconciliation with Great Britain on such Congress, sent none to the second until four principles as may ensure to your constituents a months after it had assembled. It is true that full and lasting enjoyment of all their just rights Dr. Lyman Hall, on the 13th of May, ap- and privileges.", North Carolina gave the first peared as representative of the parish of St. actual approval by a vote of convention, on the John's, appointed by the citizens of that parish, 22d of April, at which time the representatives of and was admitted to a seat. But the colony of the colony were empowered " to concur with those Georgia chose no delegates until the 4th of July, of other colonies in establishing independence.' 1775, and they did not make their appearance at The convention of Virginia, on the 15th of May, Philadelphia until the 13th of September. The unanimously resolved that their delegates be inGeorgia convention instructed its delegates “to structed to propose to that body to declare the do, transact, join and concur with the several united colonies free and independent States-abdelegates from the other colonies and provinces solved from all allegiance or dependence upon the upon this continent in all such matters and things Crown or Parliament of Great Britain-and that as shall appear eligible and fit at this alarming they give the assent of this colony to such declaratime for the preservation and defence of our rights tion and to measures for forming foreign alliances and liberties, and for the restoration of harmony and a confederation of the colonies; provided that upon constitutional principles between Great Brit- the power of forming a government for and the reg. ain and America."

ulation of the internal concerns of each colony be The object apparent with all the colonies was, left to the respective colonial legislatures." It if possible, a restoration of harmony with Great was upon this authority that Richard Henry Lee Britain. If the British ministry could have un- of Virginia, on Friday, ihe 7th of June, offered the derstood the spirit of the Americans more clearly following resolution, which was seconded by John than they did, an unhappy error would have been Adams of Massachusetts : avoided. But they were proud, conceited and Resolved, That these united colonies are, and stubborn, and imagined that chastisement would of right ought to be, free and independent States ; bring the colonists to terms. They were correct that they are absolved from all allegiance to the in believing that America did not wish to break British Crown, and that all political connection away from Great Britain, but they did not seem to between them and the State of Great Britain is, understand that continued coercion would force and ought to be, totally dissolved." the colonies to assume independence. And so for This resolution was considered June 8th and eight weary months hostilities went on. Bunker roth, upon the latter day in committee of the Hill had been assaulted by the British, and carried whole." It was then resolved to postpone the subby them with great loss. Charlestown was burned, ject until Monday, the ist of July," and in the l'iconderoga and Crown Point were captured by meanwhile, that no time be lost in case the Con. the Americans, the Canadian expedition under gress agree thereto, that a committee be appointed Arnold and Montgomery had penetrated the wil. to prepare a declaration to the effect of the first derness, and after brave fighting and much suf- said resolution." President Hancock next day fering the effort proved a failure. New York announced this committee to be composed of was captured by the British. There had been Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, John Adams of engagements by land and sea, and yet it was the Massachusetts, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsyl. case of English subjects only fighting to secure vania, Roger Sherman of Connecticut and Robert the rights which English subjects were believed R. Livingston of New York. The next day a to possess. Strong Whigs were thinking of inde- committee was appointed, Josiah Bartlett of New pendence, and wondering how the great act was Hampshire chairman, " to prepare and digese the to be accomplished. Some were fearing that an form of a confederation to be entered into by these attempt to break off from Great Britain might colonies ;” also a committee “ to prepare a plan soon be made, and they were alarmed at the pros- of treaties to be proposed to foreign powers,” John pect. Still, nothing had been publicly said or writ. Dickinson of Pennsylvania chairman.

Third Month,]

MARCH

(1876.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. h. m.
1) First Quarter 3

4 47 A.M.

(Last Quarter 17 8 23 P.M. O Full Moon... 10 III A.M.

New Moon... 25

3 II P.M.

| Day of the Year. | Day of the Month.

Day of the Week.

PHENOMENA.

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sets Rises. Souths Sets. High Tide. Low Tide, ( Per., sd, gh. A.N.
A.M. P.M. P.M.A.M. P.M. A.M. A.M P.M. A.M P.M. (Apo., 17d. Sh. P.M.

m.m.. 3. hn. . . . . . . . . . 8. . A. m. n. 9 :3 Per., zod. sh. A.M. 61 W 6 33 12 24 5 5319 I 4 33

5 5 14 5 370 7 o 32 6.3 8.58 P.M. sets 62 Th 6 31 12 12 5 54

9 38 5 31 016 6

3 6 30 o 56 I 22 6.1 0.24 A.M. 24 rises. F

6 30 11 59 5 55 10 26 6 32 1 31 7 7 1 7 35 I 49 2 20 5.7 10.03 P.M. o sets, 64 4

6 28 11 46 5 56 11 25 7 36 2 42 8 13 8 52 2 54 3 32 5.4 11.08 P.M. Reg. S. 65

5
S 6 27 11 32 5 57 O 35

8 38 3439

9 32 10 94 II 4 51 5.3 6.00 A.M. h rises. 66 6M 6 25 11 17 5 58 I 51 9 37 4 33 10 10 45 17 18

6 41 5.6

3.12 A.M. o in u. 67 7 Tu 6 24 11 2 5 59

3 6 10 32
5 12 11 II 48

6 37 7 7 5.8 2.08 P.M. OH 68 ó w 6 22 10 47 6 4 23 11 22 5 4112 o 16

O 407 35

5.18 A M. rises. 69' 9 Th 6 21 10 32 6 1

5 35 9! 6

1

8 20

8 40 6.2 P.M. ( ecl. vis 6 19 10 16.6 2 6 44 0 54 6 32 14

1 8 59 9 29 6.3|| 8.44 A M. gr.el. W '6 17 10 00 6 3 7 51 1 38 6 54 15 2 21 2 40! 9 40

9 59 6.4 9.19 P.M. sets, 6 16 9 43 6

4

2 23 7 16 16 2 591 3 19 19 18 10 38 6.5 5.11 P.M. W?. 73 13 M 6 14 9 26 6 6 10

3 3 8
7 39 17 3 38 3 59 10 57 11 18 6.5

9.49 P.M. His 74 14 Tu 6 13 9

7 II
8 3 55 8

6 18
4 19 4 41 11 38

6.5 9.59 P.M. d sets. 75 15 W 611

8 52
A.M. 4 44

5 25 25! O o 21 6.3 6.48 P.M. Ó 4 . 76 16 Th 6

9
8
9 O 12 5 35 9 12 20

5 47 6 11
6 8 8 17 6 10 113 6 27 9 56 21

7 1 30 I 54 5.9 P.M. 4 stat. 16 6 7 59 6 11 2 7 7 18 10 47 22

8 o 2 20 2 47 5.6 5.31 A.M. 0 g h. 6 4 7 41 6 12

2 55 8 9 11 45 23 8 319 3 3 19 3 50 5.4 11.15 P.M. 44 rises, So 20 M6

3 7 23

6
13 3 35 8 57 O 48 24

9 33 Io

4 4 22 4 52 5.3 1.09 A.M. Spring beg. 81 21 Tu6 1

7

5 6 14 4 81 9 44 113 25 10 32 11 5 23 5 51 5.5 9.41 P.M. Y sets. 82 22 W 6 0 6 47 6 15 4 37 10 29 2 59 26 11 25 11 50 6 19 6

44 5.7 7.30 P.M. Procy. S. Th

29
6 16

5
2 11 14
4

0 13 7 9 7 32 5.9 4.25 P.M. Ó. 84 24 F 5 56 6 10 6 17 5 24 II 59

O 34 0 54 7 53 8.13 6.0: 9.55 P.M. dsets. 85 25 S 5 55 5 52 6 18 5 46 P.M.

113 8 32 8 50 6,2 O eclipsed vis.
86 26 S
5 53 5 33 6 19

6
9 0 451 7 33

1

2 12 9 11 9 31 6.4 4.42 A.M. h rises. 87 27 M 15 52 5 1516 20 6 34 1 34

2 2 35 2 56 9 54 10 15 6.5 3.30 P.M. O.G. 88 28 Tu'5 50 4 57 6 21 7 3 2 27 10 3 31 3 20 3 43 to 39 II 2 6.5 10.04 P.M. OY.

5 48 4 38 6 22 7 38 3 25 11 21 4 4 9 4 34 11 28 11 53 6.5!! 3,57 P.M. O 90 30 Th 5 47

20 6 23
8 23 4 26 A.M. 5! 5 5 31

O 21 6.3 11.09 P.M. Sirius sets. 5 45 4 26 24 | 9 19.5 29 O 34

6 6 0 6 29 O 50 1 19 6.1 1.24 P.M. WS.

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MARCH.

and westward over three or four thousand miles of

the Pacific Ocean. It will begin at Philadelphia Jupiter 6° north of the Moon, Mar. 15.

near 4 P.M., and end about sunset. Saturn 1°

23.

Third: A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, begin. Venus 2° south

28.

ning at ih, 46m. P.M., Sept. 3, Philadelphia mean Mars 3°

time, and ending at 6h. 56m. P.M. This Eciipse

will not be visible in any part of the Western ECLIPSES FOR 1876.

Continent. It will be principally visible in In the year 1876 there will be four Eclipses, Iwo

Europe. of the Sun and two of the Moon, two of these,

Fourth: A Total Eclipse of the Sun, beginning an Eclipse of the Sun and one of the Moon, visi- at 2h. um. P.M., Sept. 17, Philadelphia mean ble in Philadelphia. The four Eclipses in order time, in the region of Australia, and ending at

7h. 25m., ncar the South Pole. The islands of First: A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, beginning the Pacific will have the exclusive opportunity at 10h, 56m. P.M., March 9, Philadelphia mean of seeing this Eclipse, New Zealand and the time. When the Moon enters the Penumbra, the

islands north of it being favorably located. first appearance of the Shadow will be at oh. 20m. A.M. of the toth. The middle of the Eclipse at THE PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC, freely disih. 2orn, A.M. Disappearance of the Shadow zh. tributed by Mr. Childs with his admirable daily, zom. A.m., and the Moon leaves the Penumbra is a costly and handsome affair, adapted, among at 3h. 44m. A.M. The Shadow will cover less than other uses, to serve as a handy guide-book to the one-third of the Moon's face.

city of Philadelphia. As we have always been Second: An Amular Eclipse of the Sun, bc- exceedingly proud of our neighbor sheet, we are ginning at oh. 28m P.M., March 23, Philadelphia glad to learn that its shadow never was greater, mean time, near the Sandwich Islands, and end. and it still "has, perhaps with but one exception, ing at sh. 4om. P.M., near Greenland. The Eclipse the largest circulation of any daily printed. will be visible over the whole of North America, | Evening Bulletin, Philadelphia.

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