Page images
PDF
EPUB

25 cts.

Tues.,

[ocr errors]

66

[ocr errors]

Fri.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Wed.,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

00

II

2,468

Fri.,

Fri., Sat., Mon., Tues., Wed., Th.,

18,729

Wed.,
Th.,
Fri.,

20

21

[ocr errors]

Sat., Tues., Wed., Th., Fri.,

Wed.,

130

29

Mon.,

Wed.,

STATEMENT OF DAILY ADMISSIONS TO THE DAILY ADMISSIONS FOR THE MONTH. CENTENNIAL INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION

JULY. AT PHILADELPHIA, May 10 to Nov. 10, 1876.

Cash Admissions. In the following tables will be found a complete Date.

Free. Total. statement of the daily admissions to the Exhi

50 cts, bition, including the admissions to the stock-yard Sat., July 1 26,410

11,419 37,829 enclosure, which was separate from the Centen. Mon.,

3 47,786 nial Exhibition grounds.

12,313 60,099 446,290

10,204 56,4941 MAY.

Wed.,

5
51,825

11,001 62,8265 Th.,

6
46,088

11,522 57,610 Cash Admissions.

33,746

11,053 44,799

8
Date.
Free. Total.

23,207

10,817 34,024 50 cts, 25 cts.

Ιο 19,133

10,526 29,659 20,645

10,513 31,158 Wed., May 10 76,172

76,172
12 20,575

10,311

30,836 Th., 14,722 4,275 18,997 Th.,

13
19,352

10,066 28,418 12 10,252

12,720
14 18,3331

10,254 28,5874
13 11,6581
5,204 16,8621 Sat.,

15 16,057

10,027 26,084 15 10,8964

4,952
15,848) Mon.,
17 18,270

10,367 28,637 16 7,056

6,057 13,113
Tues, 18 19,184

10,INI 29,295
17 12,117
6,595 18,712

19

10,019 28,748 18 JI,054 6,765 17,819

16,631

9,255 25,936 Fri.,

19
16,100
7,5271 23,627

17,714

9,678 27,392 20 18,1911 7,925 26,116. Sat.,

22 16,941

9.795 26,736 Mon., 22 12,402 8,463 20,8705 Mon., 24 20,730

48 10,562 31,340 23 17,552 8,125 25,6771 Tues.,

25 21,914

9,595 31,509 24 20,538 9,652 30,199

26 92,870 59

9,986

32,915 25 19,8214 7,335 27,1564 Th.,

27 24,7164

9,979 34,8251 26 16,792

7,327 24,119

Fri.,
28 18,924

10,057 28,981 Sat., 27 20,0914 7,619 27,710 Sat.,

15,949 3 9,942 25,894 29 16,202

7,265 23,467
Mon., 31
15,207

10,557 25,764 Tues, 301 41,1115

7,542 48,6531

Toral....... 636,278
31
26,249

240 269,929 906,447 8,914 35,163

The weather during July and a part of August was exTotal....... 378,980

124,015 502,995

cessively warm. May 30, Decoration Day.

DAILY ADMISSIONS FOR THE MONTH.
DAILY ADMISSIONS FOR THE MONTH.

AUGUST
JUNE.

Cash Admissions.
Date.

Free. Total

50 cts. Cash Admissions.

25 cts. Date.

Free. Total,

Tues., Aug. 1 50 cts. 25 cts.

22,141

54 9,644 31,839 Wed., 24,246

9,604 33,850 Th., June 1 23,200

7,676 30,876

Th.,

3 27,667 273 9,793 37,733 Fri., 26,637 9,167 35,804

4 25,015

9,776

34,791
3
22,292

30,741
5 22,304

32,300 5

Mon.,
27,555
10,544 38,099

7 23,376 25 10,511

33,912 6 28,354

38,6251
10,271

8
23.939

33,519 Wed., 31,673

10,875
42,548

9

29,818 120 9,638 39,576 8 31,6346 9,446 44,0801

82

9,243 35,397

11
9 24,693
9,609 34,302

25,880
13 9,615

35,508
28,948
9,803 38,751

22,240

74 9,849 32,163 12 21,3791

14 9,550 30,929; Mon.,

22,656

8 10,216

Tues., 13 24,223

15 9.337 33,560

25,283 63 9,471 34,817 14 29,812

Wed., 9,901

16 28,341 39,713

I10 9,499 37,959 15 31,937! 9,642 41,5791

17 27,031 166

9,269 36,466 Fri., 16 25.903 9,467 35,370 18 35,664 125

35,307 25,902

35,384
Sat.,
19

54,045
9,604

63,649 19

Mon.,
23,372
32,753

28,981

10,418

39,399 27,204

36,535

Tues., 22 9,331

31,825 202 9,672 41,699
32,134)
9,765 41,8994 Wed.,

23
39,082
313 9,796

49,191 Th., 22 39,386, 9,995| 49,2916

Th.,

24 55,930 395 10,727 67,052 23 27,693 9,612 37,305

25 32,298

9,813

42,111

26
24 25,103

9,648
34,751

97,172 10,458 107,630
26 21,120
11,669 32,789
28 34,653 146 10,426

45,225 27 20,343 10,223

29 41,310

Ιο 10,142

51,462 28 23,590

11,078

Wed.,

30 43,424 183 10,130 53,737 29 27,034)

31 11,957 38,0911 Th.,

44,777 1,023 10,342 56,142 Fri., 30 24,5414 11,623 36,164

Total....... 753,953

154,731|266,6301,175,314 Total. 695,666

256,511 952,177 Aug. 19 and 26, half-rate days; Aug. 24, New Jersey Day.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

DAILY ADMISSIONS FOR THE MONTH.

SEPTEMBER.

DAILY ADMISSIONS FOR THE MOSTU.

NOVEMBER.

So cts.

34,182

2

2

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Fri.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Th.,
Fri.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Th.,
Fri.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Tues,
Wed.,
Th.,
Fri.,
Sat.,

97,868

[ocr errors]

20 21 22

Tues.,

106,259 July

[ocr errors]

Date.
Cash Admissions.
Free. Total.

Date.
Cash Admissions.

Froc.

Total
50 cts.
25 cts.

25 cts.
Sept. 1
547 10,379 45,108 Wed., Nov. 1 106,578

1,137 12,763 122,475
59,412 10,911
70,323 Th.,

114,196
1,102 12,73 +

128 22
35,495
2,133 11,605 49,233 Fri.,

3 81,684

2,210 12,297 96,791 50,209 3,746 10,950 64.905 Sat.,

4
81,118

3,012 12,91; 91.047 53,395 6,045 10,825 70,265 Mon.,

76,632

1,304 12,331 59.336 4,703 10,985 75,044 Tues.)

74,357 1,690! 11,506 67,379 50,604 8,304 11,340 70,248 Wed.,"

89,161 1,427 12,539 103,127 9

104,314 12,023 116,337 | Th., 9 170,167 6,757 16,154 193.075 II 40,838 671 11,410 52,919 Fri.,

101,901 4,466 15,354 121.223 12 59,089 3.911 11,328 74,328

Total.. 13 72,302

895,794 23,111'118,935 1937,5€ 6,453 11,772

90,727 14 78,977 6,818 12,073

November 7: Presidential election day, November 15 63,813 528 11,506 75,907 Philadelphia Day; November ro, the closing day. * 16

92,080 11,865 103,945 stormy and cold.
18
62,623
318 11,634 74.575

SUMMARY OF ADMISSIONS,
19 92,413 453

11,801 104,667
100,502
996 11,861
113,359

May 10 to Nov. 10, 1876 (inclusive).
117.941
4,062 12,585 134,588

Cash Adimissions.
85,953 3,480 11,918 101,351

Month.

Free.

Total

50 cts.
23
95,832

25 cts.
84,627 11,205
Mon., 25 66,281 2,431 12,253 80,965 May............

378,980

124,015 $02,95 26 78,216 2,728 11,812

92,736 June..

695,666

256,511 Wed."

952,777 27 89,654 3,376 13,229

636,278 240 269,9291 906,447 Th.,

28 217,526 39,643 17,750 274,919 August.. Fri.,

753,953 154,731 206,6301 1.175,314 29 71,664 3,399 11,821

86,794 September.... 1,581 233 549,7581 308,038 2,439,050 Sat., 30

104,670 11,797 116,467 | October........ 2.308,716 25,814 329,381 2,663,711 Total 11,581,233'549,758 308,698 2,439,689

November.... 895,794 23,111 118,935 1,037.540 Sept. 7. Connecticut Day ; Sept. 14, Massachusetts Day:

May 1o, Est. Sept. 21, New York Day ; Sept. 28, Pennsylvania Day;

Free Adm..

110,500 110.500 Sept. 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30, half-rate days.

May, Work

men, before DAILY ADMISSIONS FOR THE MONTH.

7 A. M........

71,445 71,445 OCTOBER.

June, Work-
Cash Admissions.
Date.
Free. Total. 7 A. M......

50,648
50 cts.
25 cts.

Total.. 7,250,620 753,654 1,806,69219.919,966 Mon., Oct. 2 65,865

2,399 12,621 3 77,536 3,321 12,553 93,415 DAILY AVERAGES FOR EACH MONTH. 4

3,309 12,203 103,089 Th.,

Cash Admissions.
5

136 11,886
100,946
Month.

Free. Total.
76,046
12,102 88,269

50 cts. 25 cts. 72,576 318 12,261

85,155 Mon., 9

104 12,672 71,704

* 6,527
84,456 May, 19 days.. 19,946

June, 26 days.. 26,756
IO 79,435

91,979
4531 12,091

9,865 36,622 Wed., 93.449 882 12,664 106,995 July, 26 days.. 24,472

9 10,361 34,863 100,603 12 938 13,881

Aug., 27 days 27,924 115,422

5,730 9,875 53.530 13 80,505 1,421 12,338 94,264 Sept., 26 days 60,816 21,144 11,873 93,834 14 77,321 957

12,593
90,871 Oct., 26 days. 88,796

992 12,068

102,458 16 73,871 786 12,871 87,528 Nov., 9 days.. 99,532 2,567 13,215

115.315 Daily averagel 45,6011 † 4,73) 17

1,526 12,146 105,084 91,412

11,991 Wed., 18 123,080 1,697 14,097 138,874

• Excluding estimated free admissions on May toth. 19 160,115 1,240 15,052 176,407

The above average is for 159 days. Average for 87 94,040 95

13,530 107,665 days when persons were admitted at hall rates . 21

821 12,113

83,042
73,774
150 12,338

YESTERDAY the Philadelphia Ledger entered

86,262 24 88,327 193 12,237 100,757 upon its 41st year, and Mr. Childs becomingly 25 106,338 648 12,303

119,289 commemorates the event by printing it in greatly 26 121,818 482 13,361 135,661 enlarged form, on clear white paper, from new 27 94,377 1,186 12,517 108,080 type, with various other improvements.

The Sat.,

28
77,559
1,171 12,242 99,972

Ledger is a great power for good, and a positive Mon., 30 79,683

moral force not only in Philadelphia,

but wherever 356 12,540 92,579 31 80,673

else its widely extended influence is felt; this new

94,031

1,194 12,164 Total....... 2,308,7161 25,814 329,381/2,663,911 | ing to the friends of public morality and pure jour.

proof of its prosperity, therefore, must be as gratify.

nalism as it is to those who contemplate it simply shire pay October 19. Delaware and Maryland Day; tin, March 28, 1876. October 5, Rhode Island Day: October 12, New Hamp

as a business success.-New York Daily Bulle. October 26, Ohio Day: October 27. Vermont Day.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

my back.

PROVERBS.

Blessings are often not valued till they are IMPROVB opportunities.

gone. 111 doers are ill thinkers.

Charity begins at home, but should not end

there. A crowd is not company. All men can't be masters.

Friendship is the most sacred of all moral

bonds, Fear is stronger than love.

A sweet and innocent compliance is the cement Agree, for the law is costly.

of love. Dying is as natural as living.

A detractor is his own foe and the world's A long life hath long miseries. Care and diligence bring luck.

enemy. Hatred is blind as well as love.

He that gives his heart will not deny his Children are poor men's riches.

money. Idleness always envies industry,

Alms are the golden key that opens the gate of

heaven. Heaven is worth the whole world. A great fortune is a great slavery.

A wise man will make more opportunities than

he finds. A danger foreseen is half avoided. Fore-cast is better than work-hard.

He's my friend that speaks well of me behind A good example is the best sermon.

An hour of pain is as long as a day of Idle men are dead all their life long. By doing nothing we learn to do ill.

pleasure. A good friend is my nearest relation.

He that does you a very ill turn will never for

give you. A man is not so soon healed as hurt. Do good, if you expect to receive it.

How many things hath he to repent of that

lives long! A great reputation is a great charge.

Emulation is lively and generous, envy base and He doth much that doth a thing well.

malicious. Empty vessels give the greatest sound. Ignorance is the mother of impudence.

Forget other people's faults by remembering A quiet conscience causes a quiet sleep.

your own.

A man in passion rides a horse that runs away Every man living hath something to do.

with him. Ask thy purse what thou shouldest buy, Health is not valued till sickness comes.

A covetous man does nothing that he should do

till he dies. Affinity in hcarts is the nearest kindred.

He hath a good judgment that relieth not wholly A man is not good or bad for one action.

on his own. A gossip speaks ill of all, and all of her. Examples are the best lessons for youth,

He that defends an injury is next to him that

commits it. A civil denial is better than a rude grant. He that has no charity merits no mercy.

A man may say too much even upon the best

of subjects. A light purse often makes a heavy heart. He that has no shame has no conscience.

Delays increase desires, and sometimes extinGood deeds remain; all things else perish.

guish them. Envy and covetousness are never satisfied.

He that after sinning mends recommends him

self to God. He's a slave that cannot command himself. In the company of

silence is safe.

Courage, conduct and perseverance conquer all strangers,

before them. Change of weather is the discourse of fools.

He that is master of himself will soon be masA man's best fortune, or his worst, is a wife.

ter of others. A little of everything is nothing in the main. He benefits hinself that doth good to others.

If you have no enemies, it is a sign that fortune

has forgot you. He teaches me to be good that does me good. If it were not for hopes, the heart would break,

A father is a treasure, a brother a comfort, but

a friend is both. He that grasps at too much holds nothing fast. He that falls to-day may be up again to-morrow.

He that shows a passion tells his enemy where

he may hit him. As love thinks no evil, so envy speaks no good. Honest men's words are as good as their bonds.

Hunger scarce kills

any,

but gluttony and

drunkenness multitudes. Choose a wife rather by your ear than your Drunkenness turns a man out of himself, and eye.

leaves a beast in his place. He is unworthy to live who lives only for him

He that thinks his business below him will self.

always be above his business. A good cause makes a stout heart and a strong

He that can read and meditate need not think All between the cradle and coffin is uncer.

the evenings long, or life tcdious.

Happiness generally depends more on the opintain.

ion we have of things than on the things themGratitude preserves old friendship and procures

selves. He hath lived ill that knows not how to die well.

Those who desire to see full reports of the Discreet wives have sometimes neither eyes nor doings and exhibits at the Centennial grounds can ears.

find them in the Public Ledger, which is, without I know of nobody that has a wish to die this controversy, the best daily paper in the country. year.

I say best, because it is conducted with ability, Children are certain cares, but uncertain com- its statements are perfectly reliable, it is neither forts.

sectarian, partisan nor sectional, and its moral Anger begins with folly and ends with repent- tone is beyond question.--Correspondent Chris. ance.

tian Leader, Ulica, New York.

arm.

new.

[ocr errors]

GLEANINGS.

I HAVE enjoyed the happiness of this world: I

have lived and have loved. - Jean Paul F. Azért, The most laborious of all tasks is that of self. THERE IS no condition in the world so mean api examination.-kant.

despicable but yields us opportunities of dxg Censure is the tax a man pays to the public good. There is neither old nor young, mad DT for being eminent.---Swift.

woman, rich nor poor, high nor low, learned nc The place of charity, like that of God, is unlearned, but in their sphere, by a good used everywhere.--Professor Vinet.

those talents God has entrusted to their care, they It would be puzzling to decide what will become may be very beneficial to others, and prose ia of any man if some woman does not take care of struments of much good in their generation. him.

We should have fewer disorders of the minds COMMONPLACE minds usually condemn what is we could acquire more power of volition, and a beyond the reach of their understanding.–Roche- deavored by our

own energy to disperse the foucauld.

clouds which occasionally arise within our own An excellent and wise mother gave the follow. horizon-if we resolutely tore the first threads ing advice with her dying breath: My son, learn the net which gloom and ill-nature buy casi early how to say No!

around us, and made an etfort to drive away is The “rough diamond" is to be preferred to the melancholy images of a morbid imagination by glittering paste; but a high polish adds as well

incessant occupation. to its worth as to its beauty.

If thou wishest to know what thou art, lock at To those who do good in the morning every

the monuments of the dead as thou passest alors hour of the day brings pleasure, and for them the road; there thou wilt find the bones and ligit peace and joy spring from every object around. dust of kings, and tyrants, and wise men, a

It is an incontrolled truth, says Dean Swift, of those who prided themselves on their blow that no man ever made an ill' figure who under: and riches, on their glorious deeds, and the beauty stood his own talents, nor a good one who mistook of their person; but none of these things couc them.

resist the power of time. All men have a coa GREAT men never make a bad use of their mon grave. Looking at these things, thou mayes superiority; they see it, they feel it, and are not

understand what thou art. less modest. The more they have, the more they We are made better, nobler, by the society of know their own deficiencies.

the good and the noble. Perhaps of ourselves The envious man is like that rich man mentioned unable to think high thoughts, and without the by Quintilian who poisoned the flowers in his bold warmth that dares generously, we catch by garden, so that his neighbor's bees should get no degrees something of the mounting spirit and more honey from them.

the ardor proper to the stronger souls with whom A STATISTICIAN has calculated that it would re. we live familiarly, and become the sharers and quire nearly four hundred years to read the titles imitators of virtues to which we could not have of all the books contained in the various libraries given birth. The devoted courage of a leader of Europe, allowing one ininute for each title. turns his followers into heroes; the patient death

The desire of power in excess caused the of one martyr inflames in a thousand slumbering angels to fall; the desire of knowledge in excess bosoms a zeal answering to his own.-Pref. Jans caused inan to fall; but in charity there is no

Hilson. excess, neither can angels nor man come in danger It is one of the painful consequences of extreme by it. - Bacon.

old age, said Chancellor Kent, that it ceases to ex: Prof. Henry Reed most truly observes : cite interest and is apt to be left solitary and We marvel ofien at finding how, under the neglected. The control which the law still gives light of wise criticism, new powers and new to a man over the disposal of his property is one beauties are made visible to our minds in books of the most efficient means which he has, in prv. the most familiar.

tracted life, to command the attention due his inCOLERidge remarks that good sense is the firmities. The will of such an aged man ought to body of poetic genius, fancy its drapery, motion be regarded with great tenderness, when it apits life, and imagination the soul that is every: pears not to have been procured by fraudulent where and in each, and forms all into one graceful acts, but contains those very dispositions which and intelligent whole.

the circumstances of his situation and the course Every one must see daily instances of people of natural affcctions dictated. who complain from a mere habit of complaining, and make their friends uneasy and strangers merry by murmuring at evils that do not exist, The enlarged and improved Ledger continues and repining at grievances which they do not to "win golden opinions from ail sorts of people." really feel.

The New York Times this morning has a kindly FRIENDSHIP, love and piety should be treated word of recognition, and this evening the Illus. in private. We should only speak of them on trated Graphic says : “ The Ledger bas rare and confidential moments, have a silent un achieved deserved reputation in about every derstanding regarding them. There is much in department which makes a newspaper valuable, respect to them that is too tender to be thought and has shown, among other things, that an of, still more to be talked about.-Novalis. American journal can succeed without being

In his fascinating story of Monaldi, Washington personal and sensational. Its enlargement in the Allston remarks: The gratuitous kindness of a Centennial year should encourage good New York stranger will often touch us more sensibly for the newspapers to hope that journalistic prosperity moment than the welcome even of a friend, it seems may spread to this city as well, as it certainly to give wider play to our good feelings—to gener. will come to all that deserve it as much as the alize, as it were, our affections, and make us Philadelphia Ledger."-New York Corr. ashamed of all narrow or exclusive likings. spondent.

DIPLOMATIC INTERCOURSE, 1876–7.

Countries.

United States Ministers abroad. App.

Foreign Ministers to the United States.

App.

1875

Argentine Rep...... Thomas 0. Osborne, III.. 1874 Señor Don RAFAEL GARCIA..

1869 Austria...

E. F. Beale, D. C. ... 1876 COUNT LADISLAS Hoyos....... Belgium.... A. P. Merrill.....

1876 Maurice Delfosse...

1873 Bolivia.. No Representative..

No Representative. Brazil

JAMES R. PARTRIDGE, Md. 1872 Councillor A.P.DE CARVALHO BORGES 1871 Central America ... George Williamson, La.... 1873 Vacant. Chili Cornelius A. Logan, Kan.. 1873 Señor Don Ignacio Zenteno.

1876 China

GEORGE F. SEWARD... 1876 No Representative.
Colombia.
No Representative..
Santiago Perez..

1876 Costa Rica (See Central America)...

SEÑOR DON VICENTE DARDON.

1876 Denmark.. M. J. Cramer....

Mr. J. H. de Hegermann-Lindencrone... 1875 Ecuador..... No Representative.

No Representative.
France
ELIHU B.WASHBURNE, III..... 1869 M. BARTHOLDI..

1874 Germany.... J.C. BANCROFT Davis, N.Y. 1874 Mr. Kurd VON SCHOLZER.

1871 Great Britain..... EDWARDS PIERREPONT, N.Y. 1876 SIR EDWARD THORNTON, K. C. B... 1868 Greece....

7. Meredith Read, N. Y ...... 1873 No Representative. Guatemala. (See Central America)......... SEÑOR DON VICENTE DARDON.... 1872 Hawaiian Islands.. Henry A. Peirce, Mass.. 1869 Mr. E. H. ALLEN................

1870 Hayti Ebenezer D. Bassett, Pa ...... 1869 MR. STEPHEN PRESTON..........

1873 Italy

George P. Marsh, Vt.. 1861 BARON ALBERT BLANC...
Japan..
John A. BINGHAM, O. 1873 Jushie Yoshida Kiyonari.

1874 Liberia..

J. Milton Turner, Mo. 1871 No Representative. Mexico..

John W. Foster, Ind. 1873 SEÑOR DON IGNACIO MARISCAL. 1869 Netherlands James Birney

1876 Mr. de Pestel.....

1874 Paraguay (See Uruguay)... Señor Don Jose MACHAIN...

1876 Peru..... RICHARD Gibbs, N. Y 1875 COL. Don MANUEL Freyre..

1876 Portugal. Benjamin Moran, Pa.. 1874 BARON DE SANT ANNA....

1874 Russia..... George H. BOKER, Pa.. 1875 MR. NICHOLAS SHISHKIN.

1875 Spain CALEB CUSHING

1874 Sweden..... C. C. Andrews, Minn 1869 Count Carl Lewenhaupt....

|1876 Switzerland. Horace Rublee, Wis,

1869 No Representative. Turkey... Horace Maynard, Tenn 1875 GREGOIRE Aristarchi Bey..

1873 Uruguay.

John C. Caldwell, La.... 1874 No Representative. Venezuela Thomas Russell, Mass.......... 1874 Don Juan B. Dalla Costa....

1874 Envoys Extraordinary and Ministers Plenipotentiary in SMALL CAPS ; Ministers Resident in Roman; Chargés d'Affaires in Italics.

1875

1874 { Seiros Rios ANTONIO MANTILLA DE

CONTENTS.

Page!
Page 1

Page American Events for 1876...... 39 Departments of the City Gov. Planets................................... 10 Astronomical Information, etc. 2 ernment

45 Proverbs.

55 Bishops of the Various Chris. Diplomatic Intercourse, 1876- State Governments in 1877..... 49 tian Denominations in the 1877......

57 Statement of Daily Admissions United States.................. 36, 37 Easter Day....

12. to the Centennial Interna. Calendar for 1876.... 1 Eclipses in 1877.

6 tional Exhibition at PhilaCalendar for January... 2 Elections in 1877

9 delphia.....

..53, 54 Calendar for February. 4 Fixed and Movable Feasts, Supreme Court of PennsylvaCalendar for March..... 6 Fasts, etc., 1877...... 4 nia..

43 Calendar for April.................

8 Foreign Consuls at Philadel. Supreme Court of the United Calendar for May......... ... JO phia

States ...

40 Calendar for June.................. 12 Gleanings.

56 Territories

49 Calendar for July...... 14 Gov't of Pennsylvania, 1877.... 43 The Centennial International Calendar for August............... 16 Hebrew Calendar for 1877...... 8 Exhibition of 1876...........50-54 Calendar for September.......... 18 Pennsylvania Legislature, 1877

The City of Homes .......3, 5, 7, 9 Calendar for October.....

1878
43 The Ephemeris....

14 Calendar for November.......... 22 Philadelphia Chronology for United States Officers in Phil. Calendar for December.... 24 1875-76, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23 adelphia.. Churches and Religious Ser- Philadelphia City Govern- United States Government..... 40 vices in Philadelphia........25-36 ment...

44-48 United States House of RepCourt of Commissioners of the Philadelphia Necrology for resentatives.....

41 Alabama Claims 56 1875-76.....

38 United States Senate............ 41

48

20

48

« PreviousContinue »