Lydia: Or, Filial Piety. A Novel, Volume 2

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S. Cotter, 1763
 

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Page 192 - Dreffing room may be feen in Mr. Hogarth's Print of that Subject, better than I can defcribe it. THESE Deficiencies in outward Appearances, were amply fupplied by the Good-will of the young Gentlemen of the Town ; Juba never wanted a Banyan to make him an African Prince, nor Cato and his Senate good Night-gowns befitting the Dignity of Roman Senators...
Page 191 - In his travels he stops at Bideford. • At this Town . . . there was at that Time a Company of strolling Players; this Troop had most judiciously pitched upon a large Slaughter-house for their Theatre, the Place being the best adapted in the World for the executing Comedies and Tragedies in their Manner. • The Troop indeed was small, consisting of five Men and three Women; but then it made amends in Goodness for what was wanting in Number, all of them being Geniuses in the dramatic Way, not one...
Page 191 - Players ; this Troop had moft judicioufly pitched upon a large Slaughter-houfe for their Theatre, the Place the beft adapted in the World for the executing Comedies and Tragedies in their Manner. THE Troop indeed was fmall, confifting of five Men and three Women ; but then it made amends in Goodnefs for what was wanting in Number, all of them being...
Page 147 - ... their ruling passion:32 Alas, we are the scorn of those whose virtues are all venal. Minions of distress, a curled pampered race, who tremble at the northern blasts, the slaves of money; that yellow ore changes the face of nature, the eye sees not, the ear hears not; all human faculties die before it's influence; each liberal motive of the freeborn soul is quite erazed by that pernicious influence...
Page 233 - to measure the Proportions of the various Remains of Architecture to be found in that City, and compare them with what is yet to be...
Page 155 - have they not?' taking him by the hand. Cannassatego then looking upon her with contempt, told her he had never yet violated his chastity. His whole heart had been, and should be ever reserved for his lovely Yarico — 'Absent or present I am her's alone.
Page 155 - ... whole heart had been, and should be ever reserved for his lovely Yarico — 'Absent or present I am her's alone.' 'Poor man ?' says Lady Susan, 'I warrant you would not go to bed to a fine lady, lest Yarico should know it! Hah, hah, hah!' squeezing his hand in the laugh, and looking amorously upon him. 'No, Madam, beauty has no powers on me. Adieu.
Page 192 - ... home in the Evening the Linnen, which was delivered in the Morning; so that the Stock of Shirts being large, almost every Man having one at the Washing, and the other on, it could not be for want of Linnen, but clean Linnen, that sometimes these Heroes, like Harry the Fourth of France, were distrest for a clean Shirt. The Ladies were all born of very good Families, render'd unhappy by Love, turn'd out to the World by some cruel Parents or Guardian, left Orphans without Support, or by some other...
Page 288 - Eftate in the County, came to the City of Exeter, whither every Man of forty Shillings a Year had travelled ; many fifty Miles on Foot, to vote for Lord Probit ; except the following, Sir William...
Page 145 - ... inconsistent, whose words, hurried out like water from an inverted bottle, included nothing to be understood, ever beginning, never closing one sentence, rambling from man to man, from one half thought to another, the farce and mockery of national prudence. Can it be, I said to myself, that this man can direct the business of a people?

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