Birdsong

Front Cover
Random House, 1993 - Fiction - 402 pages
Set before and during the Great War, Birdsong captures the drama of that era on both a national and a personal scale. It is the story of Stephen Wraysford, a young Englishman who journeys to France on business in 1910 and becomes so entangled in a passionate clandestine love affair that he never returns home. Rootless and heartbroken when war breaks out in 1914, he joins the army and is given command of a brigade of miners, whose macabre assignment is to tunnel beneath German lines and set off bombs under the enemy trenches - thereby creating a pitch-dark subterranean battlefield even more ghastly than the air and trench warfare above them. As have many lost young men, Stephen finds a place and an intense camaraderie in this tortuous world, and through his eyes Faulks reveals not only the unspeakable carnage but the unexpected love and loyalty that took place in the fields of France a mere two generations ago.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
39
4 stars
36
3 stars
15
2 stars
3
1 star
2

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bcrowl399 - LibraryThing

I was expecting a little more from this book based on the reviews I'd read. It was well written, poignant, captivating. However there were times when the details were skimmed over and other places ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Clara53 - LibraryThing

An epic tumultuous saga, starting from 1910 to 1918, and then jumping to 1978-79, a follow up of sorts. 1910, France - an ardent and brief love affair (which didn't particularly grab my heart, like I ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (1993)

His first novel, A Trick of Light, was published in 1984. By this time he had become a feature writer on the Sunday Telegraph and in 1986 moved to the new national daily paper the Independent as its literary editor. His second novel, The Girl at the Lion d'Or, was published in 1989. In 1991 he gave up journalism to concentrate on writing. In 1992 his third novel, A Fool's Alphabet, was published in London, and in 1993 he published Birdsong to huge critical acclaim. It has so far sold more than 400,000 copies in Britain. In January 1997 a television and bookshop poll among British readers placed it in their top fifty books of the century. He was named Author of the Year in the British Book Awards of 1995. He has since published a nonfiction book,

Bibliographic information