The No-nonsense Guide to Conflict and Peace

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New Internationalist, 2006 - History - 144 pages

The twentieth century was the most bloody in history, and already conflict in this century has taken a heavy toll. Most wars are now within countries rather than between states, and often it is civilians that suffer most, especially women and children.

This is an invaluable guide for students, peace groups, and activists. It examines the changing types of war, including the war on terror and ethnic conflict such as in Rwanda, the role of diplomacy and the UN, and what steps ordinary people are taking to rebuild communities. It offers ideas and inspiration for creating lasting peace.

 

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Contents

Introduction
8
Chap 1
10
Chap 2
26
Chap 3
46
Chap 5
68
Chap 6
85
Chap 7
106
Contacts
127
Index
143
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Professor Helen Ware is Chair of International Agency Leadership (Peace Building) at the School of Professional Development in the University of New England (UNE), Australia. Sabina Lautensach studied first in Canada and has a PhD from University of Otago (NZ). She is currently a research fellow at the Asia Institute of the University of Auckland and editor of the Australasian Journal of Human Security. Peter Greener emigrated to New Zealand in 1983 from the UK. He is an experienced child, family and adult psychotherapist. His most recent publications include Push for Peace (ed), 2005. Deanna Iribarnegaray is currently completing a PhD at the UNE on the topic of 'understanding global terrorism'.

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