Rimini: And Other Poems

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W.D. Ticknor & Company, 1844 - 123 pages
 

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Page 122 - mongst them sat the Count de Lorge, with one for whom he sighed : And truly 'twas a gallant thing to see that crowning show, Valor and love, and a king above, and the royal beasts below.
Page 36 - Who had been beguiled — she who was made Within a gentle bosom to be laid— To bless and to be blessed— to be heart-bare To one who found his bettered likeness there — To think for ever with him, like a bride — To haunt his eye, like taste personified — To double his delight, to share his sorrow. And like a morning beam, wake to him every morrow?
Page 122 - ... twas a gallant thing to see that crowning show: Valor and love, and a king above, and the royal beasts below. Ramped and roared the lions, with horrid laughing jaws; They bit, they glared, gave blows like beams, a wind went with their paws ; With wallowing might and stifled roar they rolled on one another.
Page 114 - GREEN little vaulter in the sunny grass, Catching your heart up at the feel of June; Sole voice that's heard amidst the lazy noon, When even the bees lag at the summoning brass; And you, warm little housekeeper, who class With those who think the candles come too soon, Loving the fire, and with your tricksome tune Nick the glad silent moments as they pass...
Page 123 - He surely would do wondrous things to show his love of me; King, ladies, lovers, all look on; the occasion is divine; I'll drop my glove to prove his love; great glory will be mine.
Page 6 - ... delicious time are singing, Darting with freaks and snatches up and down, Where the light woods go seaward from the town; While happy faces, striking through the green Of leafy roads, at every turn are seen; And the far ships, lifting their sails of white Like joyful hands, come up with scattery light, Come gleaming up, true to the wished-for day, And chase the whistling brine, and swirl into the bay.
Page 26 - Various the trees and passing foliage here, — Wild pear, and oak, and dusky juniper, With briony between in trails of white, And ivy, and the suckle's streaky light, And moss, warm gleaming with a sudden mark, Like growths of sunshine left upon the bark ; And still the pine, flat-topped and dark and tall, In lordly right predominant o'er all.
Page 6 - Yearns the deep talk, the ready laugh ascends : Callings, and clapping doors, and curs unite, And shouts from mere exuberance of delight, And armed bands, making important way, Gallant and grave, the lords of holiday, And nodding neighbours, greeting as they run, And pilgrims, chanting in the morning sun.
Page 46 - twas a temple, as its sculpture told, Built to the Nymphs that haunted there of old ; For o'er the door was carved a sacrifice By girls and shepherds brought, with reverend eyes, Of sylvan drinks and foods, simple and sweet, And goats with struggling horns and planted...
Page 50 - So sat she fixed; and so observed was she Of one, who at the door stood tenderly, Paulo, - who from a window seeing her Go straight across the lawn, and guessing where, Had thought she was in tears, and found, that day, His usual efforts vain to keep away. 580 'May I come in?

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