Fundamentals of Creep in Metals and Alloys

Front Cover
* Numerous line drawings with consistent format and units allow easy comparison of the behavior of a very wide range of materials
* Transmission electron micrographs provide a direct insight in the basic microstructure of metals deforming at high temperatures
* Extensive literature review of over 1000 references provide an excellent reference document, and a very balanced discussion

Understanding the strength of materials at a range of temperatures is critically important to a huge number of researchers and practitioners from a wide range of fields and industry sectors including metallurgists, industrial designers, aerospace R&D personnel, and structural engineers.

The most up-to date and comprehensive book in the field, Fundamentals of Creep in Metals and Alloys discusses the fundamentals of time-dependent plasticity or creep plasticity in metals, alloys and metallic compounds. This is the first book of its kind that provides broad coverage of a range of materials not just a sub-group such as metallic compounds, superalloys or crystals. As such it presents the most balanced view of creep for all materials scientists.

The theory of all of these phenomena are extensively reviewed and analysed in view of an extensive bibliography that includes the most recent publications in the field. All sections of the book have undergone extensive peer review and therefore the reader can be sure they have access to the most up-to-date research, fully interrogated, from the world’s leading investigators.

· Numerous line drawings with consistent format and units allow easy comparison of the behavior of a very wide range of materials
· Transmission electron micrographs provide a direct insight in the basic microstructure of metals deforming at high temperatures
· Extensive literature review of over 1000 references provide an excellent reference document, and a very balanced discussion

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

thank heaven for an intelligent book on this subject.

Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction
3
Chapter 2 FivePowerLaw Creep
13
Chapter 3 DiffusionalCreep
91
Chapter 4 HarperDorn Creep
99
Chapter 5 ThreePowerLaw Viscous Glide Creep
111
Chapter 6 Superplasticity
123
Chapter 7 Recrystallization
143
Chapter 8 Creep Behavior of ParticleStrengthened Alloys
151
Chapter 9 Creep of Intermetallics
173
Chapter 10 Creep Fracture
215
References
243
Index
269
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 120 - Yang et al. [44] recently argued that, when disorder is introduced into an ordered intermetallic solid by the glide of a dislocation, the steadystate velocity is limited by the rate at which chemical diffusion can reinstate order behind the glide dislocation. In such cases, the deformation is actually controlled by a viscous glide process.
Page 81 - All this suggests that the details of the subgrain boundaries are not an important consideration in the rate-controlling process for creep. At the onset of steady state essentially all of the subgrain boundaries have small misorientation angles. If we replace one-third of these boundaries with high-angle boundaries (average misorientation of about 25°) and double the average misorientation of the remaining...
Page 123 - Super-plasticity is now defined as "the ability of a polycrystalline material to exhibit, in a generally isotropic manner, very high tensile elongations prior to failure.
Page 113 - Cottrell-Jaswon dragging mechanism is considered ss~ ( ' where e is the solute-solvent size difference, C is the concentration of solute atoms and D is the diffusion coefficient for the solute atoms, calculated using Darken's [358] analysis.
Page 74 - Figure 6, where the dislocation density monotonically increases to the steady state value under constant strain-rate conditions, can also be shown consistent with the Taylor equation. Challenges to the proposition of Taylor hardening for 5-power-law creep in metals and class M alloys include the microstructural observations during primary creep under constant-stress conditions. For example, it has nearly always been observed during primary creep of pure metals and Class M alloys that the density...
Page 248 - NPL Creep Conference 1954, Creep and fracture of metals at high temperatures. HM Stationery Office, London, 1956.
Page 76 - ES a0 = f^[k,b/M]ppass (constant stress) (17) where f£ is the fraction of dislocations that are mobile at the peak (total) dislocation density of pp, the peak dislocation density, which will be assumed equal to the maximum dislocation density observed experimentally in a pE plot of a constant stress test. Since at steady-state from Eqn.
Page 259 - Fatigue, in High Temperature Alloys for Gas Turbines and Other Applications, W. Betz et al, Ed., Riedel Publishing Co., Dordrecht, Holland, 1986, p 1617-1628 20. MY Nazmy, The Applicability of Strainrange Partitioning to High Temperature, Low Cycle Fatigue Life Prediction of 'IN 738
Page 77 - This means that the observed strain-rate "peaks" would predict smaller dislocation peaks or even an absence of peaks for the observed initial strain-rates in constant-stress tests. In a somewhat circular argument, the consistency between the predictions of equation (74) and the experimental observations may suggest that the exponents of 1-2 may be reasonable.
Page 115 - The transitions between regions I and II and between regions II and III are now well established [362].

About the author (2004)

Dr. Kassner is a professor in the department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. He holds M.S.and Ph.D. degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from Stanford University, has published two books and more than 200 articles and book chapters in the areas of metal plasticity theory, creep, fracture, phase diagrams, fatigue, and semi-solid forming, and currently serves on the editorial board of Elsevier’s International Journal of Plasticity.