West American History, Volume 33, Part 1

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Page 460 - Pacific homes, humbly trusting that the day is not far distant when we may pass from the north to the south, from the east to the west of our western possessions without fear or danger, and behold in every man a brother.
Page 76 - Where thou wilt, lad, I'll make one ; an I do not, call me villain, and baffle me.* P. Hen. I see a good amendment of life in thee ; from praying, to purse-taking. Enter POINS, at a distance. Fal. Why, Hal, 'tis my vocation, Hal ; 'tis no sin for a man to labour in his vocation.
Page 29 - Commentaries, remarks, that this law of Nature being coeval with mankind and dictated by God himself, is of course superior in obligation to any other. It is binding over all the globe, in all countries, and at all times; no human laws are of any validity if contrary to this, and such of them as are valid derive all their force and all their validity and all their authority, mediately and immediately, from this original...
Page 30 - ... to secure the existence of the body politic, to protect it, and to furnish the individuals, who compose it, with the power of enjoying, in safety and tranquillity, their natural rights, and the blessings of life : and whenever these great objects are not obtained, the people have a right to alter the government, and to take measures, necessary for their safety, prosperity, and happiness.
Page 380 - Though the mills of God grind slowly, yet they grind exceeding small; Though with patience he stands waiting, with exactness grinds he all.
Page 286 - So, naturalists observe, a flea Has smaller fleas that on him prey; And- these have smaller still to bite 'em, And so proceed ad infinitum.
Page 674 - Tender-handed stroke a nettle, And it stings you for your pains ; Grasp it like a man of mettle, And it soft as silk remains.
Page 29 - Let men learn that a legislature is not " our God upon earth," though, by the authority they ascribe to it, and the things they expect from it, they would seem to think it is. Let them learn rather that it is an institution serving a purely temporary purpose, whose power, when not stolen, is at the best borrowed.
Page 415 - The duty of the United States to guarantee to every State in this Union a republican form of government...
Page 211 - ... for the maintenance of the peace and good order of society, and the preservation of the lives and property of the citizens of San Francisco...

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