Poems, Essays and Opinions: First series Selections from August 7th, 1850, to the end of February, 1851

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Aylott and Jones, 1851

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Page 239 - Anon out of the earth a fabric huge Rose like an exhalation, with the sound Of dulcet symphonies and voices sweet, Built like a temple, where pilasters round Were set, and Doric pillars overlaid With golden architrave ; nor did there want Cornice or frieze, with bossy sculptures graven •, The roof was fretted gold.
Page 238 - Let none admire That riches grow in Hell; that soil may best Deserve the precious bane.
Page 239 - The ascending pile Stood fixed her stately height ; and straight the doors, Opening their brazen folds, discover, wide Within, her ample spaces o'er the smooth And level pavement : from the arched roof, Pendent by subtle magic, many a row Of starry lamps and blazing cressets, fed With naphtha and asphaltus, yielded light As from a sky.
Page 47 - The sight of the horrible deeds committed by the Imperialists, whether in drunkenness or by command, or in consequence of their stupidly ferocious natures, was such as to overwhelm the mind and freeze the blood in men's veins — they were beyond the limits of imagination or belief. Not only were they ferocious towards women, children, and the sick, but the tortures they inflicted were refined in such a manner as to show how much the cruelty of man exceeds that of the most ferocious animals. Limbs...
Page 154 - How ! this indebted Albion, now imbued with the most perfidious principles, dares she rouse the bear (as they call us) which almost devoured Napoleon with the first army that ever was on her territory, and went even to Paris to avenge herself for this temerity ! No ! its turn must come, and soon we will only have to treat with this people at Calcutta ; her false policy has compromised her tranquillity. Let her go and ally herself with the negroes of Africa, to whom she wishes so much good, and for...
Page 135 - I cannot advise that they should be sent away. ' It is certainly astonishing that the enemy have been able to remain in this country so long ; and it is an extraordinary instance of what a French army can do. It is positively a fact that they brought no provisions with them, and they have not received even a letter since they entered Portugal. With all our money, and having in our...
Page 15 - The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself; * Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like the baseless fabric of a vision, Leave not a wreck behind.
Page 169 - I hope, be disposed to look at their conduct, and every thing which respects that country, as they would look upon the people and the affairs of England and Scotland. I will say, however, that, if I am disappointed in my hopes of tranquillity, after a trial has been given of the measure, I shall have no scruple in coming down to parliament and laying before it the state of the case, and calling for the necessary powers to enable the government to take the steps suited to the occasion. I shall do...
Page 131 - I am bordering upon seventyseven years of age passed in honour. " I hope that the Almighty may protect me from being the witness of the tragedy which I cannot persuade my contemporaries to take measures to avert.
Page 324 - In what respect is the union of all nations at the Great Exhibition calculated to further the moral and religious welfare of mankind, and thus conduce to the glory of God? And in what respect may we, as a nation nnd as individuals, most effectually promote this object?

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