The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal, Volume 12

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Published for the proprietor, 1849 - Architecture
 

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Page 221 - For, indeed, the greatest glory of a building is not in its stones, nor in its gold. Its glory is in its Age, and in that deep sense of voicefulness, of stern watching, of mysterious sympathy, nay, even of approval or condemnation, which we feel in walls that have long been washed by the passing waves of humanity.
Page 195 - ... so vast as to rend a cable asunder. Hydrogen gas and high-pressure steam ; columns of water and columns of mercury ; a hundred atmospheres, and a perfect vacuum ; machines working in a circle without fire or steam, generating power at one end of the process and giving it out at the other ; carriages...
Page 24 - A few years ago magnetism was to us an occult power affecting only a few bodies ; now it is found to influence all bodies, and to possess the most intimate relations with electricity, heat, chemical action, light, crystallization, and, through it, with the forces concerned in cohesion ; and we may, in the present state of things, well feel urged to continue in our labours, encouraged by the hope of bringing it into a bond of union with gravity itself.
Page 222 - A man who has the gift, will take up any style that is going, the style of his day, and will work in that, and be great in that...
Page 36 - ... considerations adduced seem to me to show clearly that there really exist two elastic limits for any material, between which the displacements or deflexions, or what may in general be termed the changes of form, must be confined, if we wish to avoid giving the material a set, or, in the case of variable strains, if we wish to avoid giving it a continuous succession of sets which would gradually bring about its destruction ; that these two elastic limits are usually situated one on the one side...
Page 195 - ... to proceed to Darlington and the neighbourhood of Newcastle, to obtain on the spot, the requisite information, and to report the same to the Board, with their opinion on the subject. This journey of inspection took place in the beginning of October, 1828, and the Deputation returned with a fund of information ; but of so mixed, and in some respects of so contradictory a nature, that the great question as to the comparative merits of Locomotive and Fixed Engines was as far from being settled as...
Page 160 - It was not an easy task for me to keep the engine down to ten miles an hour, but it must be done, and I did my best. I had to place myself in that most unpleasant of all positions — the witnessbox of a Parliamentary Committee. I was not long in it...
Page 36 - From what has been stated above, deduced from experiments made with great care, it is evident that the maxim of loading bodies within the elastic limit, has no foundation in nature...
Page 24 - Hence the author concludes that it is neither attraction nor repulsion which causes the set, or determines the final position of a magnecrystallic body. He next considers it as a force dependent upon the crystalline condition of the body, and therefore associated with the original molecular forces of the matter. He shows experimentally, that, as the magnet can move a crystal, so also a crystal can move a magnet. Also, that heat takes away this power just before the crystal fuses, and that cooling...
Page 35 - If, after this, all external stress be removed from the bar, it will assume a position of equilibrium, in which the outer particles will be strained in the direction opposite to that in which it was twisted, and the inner ones in the same direction as that of the twisting, the two sets of opposite couples thus produced among the particles of the bar balancing one another.

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