The Body in the Library

Front Cover
Leigh Dale, Simon Ryan
Rodopi, 1998 - Literary Criticism - 272 pages
The body is increasingly understood as being at the centre of colonial and post-colonial relationships and textual productions. Creating and circulating images of the undisciplined body of the 'other' was and is a critical aspect of colonialism. Likewise, resistance to colonial practices was also frequently corporeal, with indigenous peoples appropriating, parodying, and subverting those European practices which were used to signify the 'civilized' status of the colonizing body.The Body in the Library reads representations of the corporeal in texts of empire; case studies include:• gendered representations of corporeality• medical régimes• ethnography and photography in the Pacific• cultural transvestism in theatre• disease and colonial knowledge generation• 'freak shows' and colonial exhibits• cinematic representations of bodies• geography and the metaphorization of land as a penetrable body• marketing the body• organ transplants and the limits of the post-colonial paradigmIn viewing colonialism and resistance as a bodily phenomenon, The Body in the Library enables new perspectives on the process of colonization and resistance. It is an important resource for teachers and students of colonial and post-colonial literatures.
 

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Contents

Beryl Langer
15
John Frow
35
SHAne Wilcox
55
JoAnn Wallace
73
Chris Prentice
87
Howard McNaughton
105
Anne Maxwell
121
JoHAnna Gibson
141
Veronica Kelly
167
Joanne Tompkins
180
Gillian WhITlock
197
Bill Ashcroft
207
Christy Collis
225
Simon Ryan
237
Wendy Woodward
249
Helen Gilbert
261

Robert Dingley
155

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Page 20 - Physical pain does not simply resist language but actively destroys it, bringing about an immediate reversion to a state anterior to language, to the sounds and cries a human being makes before language is learned
Page 12 - Sander Gilman, Difference and Pathology: Stereotypes of Sexuality, Race, and Madness (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1985); idem, "Black Bodies, White Bodies: Toward an Iconography of Female Sexuality in Late Nineteenth-Century Art, Medicine, and Literature," in "Race,

About the author (1998)

Leigh Dale is a Lecturer in the Department of English, University of Queensland. She has published in the field of Australian and post-colonial literature and is the author of The English Men: Professing Literature in Australian Universities.
Simon Ryan is a Lecturer in the School of Arts and Sciences, Australian Catholic University. He is the author of The Cartographic Eye: How Explorers Saw Australia.

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