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good read probably

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Reading this book as an adolescent influenced me to become a life-long opponent of the death penalty.

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great book

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The best
The best true crime book ever! Amazing story telling.

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From a lover of true crime books I found the style of this book a refreshing change. Highly recommend.

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I was teetering between 3 and 4 *'s for this book, and was inclined to give it 3, until it was finished. It left me with such an overcast feeling of sadness. Any time a story can impact my feelings - well, that's why I read. That's what I look for. Capote did an excellent job of maintaining a somber tone throughout. He took hold of my attention, in a gentle but firm way, and carried it throughout the book, which had many peaks and valleys - though none too dramatic, lest he stray from the dark monotone of the narrator. Murder, sympathy, adventure and revenge all add up to a story well told and worth reading. 

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Selected by Vicky Ward:
“All literature is about sex,” my English professor at Cambridge told me as an undergraduate. He should have added it is also about money. For me, there are two books
whose views on money hold the greatest relevance to business today.
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is the story of a man who knows the only way to capture his lover’s heart is to become rich – he describes the appeal of wealth and his lover: “Her voice sounded of money.” No matter if he gains his wealth in a Bernie Madoff way.
But even when Gatsby becomes rich, he’s still a tragic outsider. Fitzgerald makes the point that some clubs just can’t be crashed with what I find to be the most appalling – but true – line in the book. “Tom and Daisy – they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” As I write I think of several fund managers who lost their clients millions in the crash of 2008 – but they still have their planes, boats and palaces.
But it was Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, the true-life thriller, that taught me the most about the pursuit of money.
I stayed up all night reading the book, desperate to unravel the psychological motives behind the appalling murders of the Clutter family. I was sure it had to be something shocking, surprising, exotic. But then comes the awful, bland truth – six people died because one dark night men went looking for a safe full of money and found nothing.
The motive for the crime hangs on just one paragraph, when Perry Smith, one of the killers, empties the purse of the 12-year-old Nancy Clutter. “I found a little purse – like a doll’s purse. Inside it was a silver dollar. I dropped it . . . and I had to get down on my knees . . . it made me sick . . . here I am on my knees crawling on my belly to steal a child’s silver dollar.”
The disgust within Smith leads to the sickening killings – and right there, on the page laid out in Capote’s cold clinical style, you have it: the desperation, the longing and the extreme actions people will take – for money, or even worse the humiliation of the lack of it.
Fast forward to 2010. In Cold Blood explains Bernie Madoff and all those like him; it explains the desires that led to the financial crisis – and will lead to future crises. It does what great literature ought to do. It shows us reality in extremis, so that we just cannot disconnect it from it; we can never forget the true place of money in life. We can only wish that life were not like that.
The writer is a contributor to Vanity Fair magazine.
 

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72. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote. American Literature 343 pages. Well, I first started this book one day when I was subbing in an English classroom in the Iowa Grant School District. Kids were being awful watching a movie; I was being a putz reading this book. Twelve years later, I picked it back up and read the whole thing, a true story. I guess I was attracted to it in the first place because I have so much history in Kansas, where most of the story is set. A couple of delinquents and downright dirtball types decide to flex their evil ways on a poor, unsuspecting family they believe to be rich. During the nighttime robbery, the family members are all butchered, at close range. One or more is shot with a shotgun after being tied up; others have their throats slit. This is a masterpiece by Mr. Capote, although it is one that will haunt you, perhaps, forever. *****Five Stars 

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http://thebookwormslibrary.com/?p=633

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It just so happened that on one gloriously sunny day a mobile library passed by. This book was the one that flew cloutingly in my face from the back of the van. Picking it up, I immediately experienced an ephithany and decided to become a monk in southern Lebanon.

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