Review of The Picture of Australia: Exhibiting New Holland, Van Dieman's Land, and All the Settlements, from the First at Sydney to the Last at Swan River

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1830 - Australia - 21 pages
 

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Page 172 - In giving my opinion of the land seen on the banks of the Swan River, I hesitate not in pronouncing it superior to any I ever saw in New South Wales, east of the Blue Mountains, not only in its local character, but in the many existing advantages which it holds out to settlers.
Page 172 - Mountains, not only in its local character, but in the many existing advantages which it holds out to settlers. These advantages I consider to be, ' First, the evident superiority of the soil. ' Secondly, the facility with which a settler can bring his farm into a state of immediate culture, in consequence of the open state of the country, which allows not a greater average than two trees to an acre. ' Thirdly, the general abundance of springs, producing water of the best quality, and the consequent...
Page 165 - Lastly, in order to support the monkey system, ' Promote religion \of the kind which will make men servile] — protect public morals [among those who are to give and not to take"\-~- repress vice and infidelity [by setting each man to rob his neighbour, and religion to hold the door\ — keep the different classes of the community in strict subordination to each other...
Page 183 - In these cases, their painted bodies, white teeth, shock heads of hair; their wild and savage appearance, with the reflection of the fire in a dark night, would have formed a terrific spectacle to any person coming suddenly and unexpectedly upon them. They are, however, one of the best-natured people in the world, and would never hurt a white man if treated with civility and kindness.
Page 181 - They have usually been treated, in distant parts of the colony, as if they had been dogs, and shot by convict-servants, at a distance from society, for the most trifling causes.
Page 171 - ... occurring before the sea-breeze set in, the latter at midnight. The French found the temperature when at anchor, in June, from 14 to 17 of Reaumur, or 63 to 70 of Fahrenheit. On the mountains, Captain Stirling says, the temperature appeared to be about 15 below that of the plain. The alternate land and sea breezes create a moisture in the atmosphere which renders the climate cool and agreeable ; the mornings and evenings are particularly so ; and the nights are almost invariably brilliant...
Page 184 - They are remarkably fond of their children, and when the parents die, the children are adopted by the unmarried men and women, and taken the greatest care of. They are exceedingly kind and generous towards each other: if I give tobacco or any thing else to any man, it is divided with the first he meets without being asked for it.
Page 184 - ... of all the tribes in the vicinity. The sawyers appeared dreadfully alarmed, saying that vengeance would certainly be taken ; that as they were at the outposts, they would be the first to be speared ; and that they must immediately be furnished with fire-arms to protect themselves. To this, however, I did not agree, as I believed my influence over the natives, and the power I possessed to send off the offender, would satisfy them, and preserve the peace. ' The two natives who accompanied me stood...
Page 181 - The natives complained to me frequently that ' white pellow' shot their relations and friends, and shewed me many orphans whose parents had fallen by the hands of white men near this spot. They pointed out one white man...
Page 170 - the country in general rich and romantic, gained the summit of the first range of mountains, and had a bird's-eye view of an immense plain, which extended as far as the eye could reach to the northward, southward, and westward. After ten days...

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