Anna Karenina

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Mar 5, 2012 - Fiction - 752 pages
A beautiful society wife from St. Petersburg, determined to live life on her own terms, sacrifices everything to follow her conviction that love is stronger than duty. A socially inept but warmhearted landowner pursues his own visions instead of conforming to conventional views. The adulteress and the philosopher head the vibrant cast of characters in Anna Karenina, Tolstoy's tumultuous tale of passion and self-discovery.
This novel marks a turning point in the author's career, the juncture at which he turned from fiction toward faith. Set against a backdrop of the historic social changes that swept Russia during the late nineteenth century, it reflects Tolstoy's own personal and psychological transformation. Two worlds collide in the course of this epochal story: that of the old-time aristocrats, who struggle to uphold their traditions of serfdom and authoritarian government, and that of the Westernizing liberals, who promote technology, rationalism, and democracy. This cultural clash unfolds in a compelling, emotional drama of seduction, betrayal, and redemption.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - auntieknickers - LibraryThing

What I learned from this book: Adultery is probably a bad idea. It's the children who suffer. Nineteenth-century upper-class European women didn't have it so good in spite of the servants and fancy clothes. Read full review

ANNA KARENINA

User Review  - Kirkus

The husband-and-wife team who have given us refreshing English versions of Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Chekhov now present their lucid translation of Tolstoy's panoramic tale of adultery and society: a ... Read full review

Contents

PART
1
PART TWO
105
PART THREE
214
PART FOUR
319
PART FIVE
393
PART SIX
495
PART SEVEN
602
PART EIGHT
691
List of Characters
736

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About the author (2012)

Novelist, essayist, dramatist, and philosopher, Count Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) is most famous for his sprawling portraits of 19th-century Russian life, as recounted in Anna Karenina and War and Peace.

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