Why We Age: Solving the Puzzle of Aging

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Expert Genetic Services, Mar 4, 2019 - Science - 191 pages

Why We Age explains the biology of aging in an all inclusive way for the first time. The author Dr Judy Ford has undertaken research in Cell Biology, Genetics and Public Health and is able to use her unusual experience to 'cross disciplines' and explain how all the pieces of the jigsaw fit together.

In the first part of the book she explains how chromosomes and cell division fit together with fat metabolism and cellular energy to cause age-related changes and what we can do to minimise the negative outcomes. In the second part of the book she looks at world data and how the facts add to our understanding.

This book can be enjoyed by all intelligent readers but those with a science or health related background will find it especially enlightening.

 

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Contents

Crikey Im 40 is it all downhill from here?
2
Why fats lipids are so important to life
7
Genes chromosomes telomeres cell division
16
The telomere limit and the p53 gene
29
Fatty acids and aging
37
Calorie Restriction fatty acids and aging
48
Our other defense systems and the importance
54
of dietary sulfur
59
Longevity and health status of different populations
65
Cross checking research results
71
Where angels fear to tread
74
Deaths from cancers and chronic illnesses in the world Do the theories fit the data?
82
LIFESTYLE ACTIONS WE CAN TAKE
107
Starting at the top dental health
127
Sulfur minerals and vitamins
151
Body and mind exercises and aging well
166

Telomere p53 glutathione sequence of events in Primary Secondary Aging
63
INTERNATIONAL DATA A CAUTIONARY TALE
64

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About the author (2019)

Dr Judy Ford is a geneticist, cell biologist and data analyst, who is well known for her ability to translate complex science into entertaining stories. She completed her PhD at Sydney University in 1971 and led human cytogenetics laboratories for 25 years. Her knowledge of human chromosomes and human/medical genetics is underpinned by her interest in cell biology and chromosome behaviour but her major motivation is to understand how genes and lifestyle interact to cause diseases, especially those associated with ageing. Judy is the author of nearly 100 research papers and several books for the public. Her latest book ‘Why we age’ explains the biology of ageing and how we can improve our health to minimise its negative effects.

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