A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes

Front Cover
Bantam Books, 1995 - Science - 219 pages
In the ten years since its publication in 1988, Stephen Hawking's classic work has become a landmark volume in scientific writing, with more than nine million copies in forty languages sold worldwide. That edition was on the cutting edge of what was then known about the origins and nature of the universe. But the intervening years have seen extraordinary advances in the technology of observing both the micro- and the macrocosmic worlds. These observations have confirmed many of Professor Hawking's theoretical predictions in the first edition of his book, including the recent discoveries of the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite (COBE), which probed back in time to within 300,000 years of the universe's beginning and revealed wrinkles in the fabric of space-time that he had projected. Eager to bring to his original text the new knowledge revealed by these observations, as well as his own recent research, Professor Hawking has prepared a new introduction to the book, written an entirely new chapter on wormholes and time travel, and updated the chapters throughout.

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Will make you think

User Review  - DPepp - Borders

This book was simply amazing it will make you think about the world around you and how everything is affected by small things. I loved this book, I finished rather quickly because I couldn't put it down. Read full review

Review: A Brief History of Time

User Review  - Ryan Potter - Goodreads

A very good read. Although it does still contain some jargon, and is very technical at times, it is the laypersons best opportunity to understand quantum physics and general relativity. That said, it ... Read full review

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About the author (1995)

In 1963, Stephen Hawking contracted motor neurone disease and was given two years to live. Yet he went on to Cambridge to become a brilliant researcher and Professorial Fellow at Gonville and Caius College. For thirty years he held the post of Lucasian Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at Cambridge, the chair held by Isaac Newton in 1663. Professor Hawking has over a dozen honorary degrees, was awarded the CBE in 1982. He is a fellow of the Royal Society and a Member of the US National Academy of Science.

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