The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Zombie Jim

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Apr 12, 2011 - Fiction - 288 pages
THERE WARN’T NO HOME LIKE A RAFT, AFTER ALL.

THE MONSTERS CAIN’T GET YOU THERE. NOT SO EASY.

Free at last! Huckleberry Finn and Bagger Jim, his dearest, deadest friend, have set sail on a great adventure once again, but this time rattlers, scammers, and robbers are the least of their worries. The pox is killing men and bringing them back meaner and hungrier than ever, and zombies all over are giving in to their urges to eat. Huck can’t be sure that friendship will keep him from getting eaten up too, but with a price on Jim’s head for the murder Huck staged of himself, they’ve got to rely on each other and the mighty Mississippi to make their great escape. . . .
 

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User Review  - SusieBookworm - LibraryThing

Mark Twain's classic novel - with a few zombie twists. Huck Finn is off on his rafting adventure, but this time he's accompanied by one of the (un)dead: a runaway bagger, Jim. The enslavement of ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
79
Section 2
123
Section 3
129
Section 4
227
Section 5
235
Section 6
255
Section 7
265
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Mark Twain, born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in 1835, left school at age 12. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher, which furnished him with a wide knowledge of humanity and the perfect grasp of local customs and speech manifested in his writing. It wasn't until The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), that he was recognized by the literary establishment as one of the greatest writers America would ever produce.

Toward the end of his life, plagued by personal tragedy and financial failure, Twain grew more and more cynical and pessimistic. Though his fame continued to widen--Yale and Oxford awarded him honorary degrees--he spent his last years in gloom and desperation, but he lives on in American letters as "the Lincoln of our literature."

W. Bill Czolgosz has written fewer books than Mark Twain, and none of them nearly as competently. His own personal favorite is Eat @t Zero’s, published by Coscom Entertainment in 2005 and currently out of print. His latest project is a graphic novel called Zombifrieze, illustrated by Sean Simmans, a frequent collaborator.

Czolgosz lives in Proud Lake, Saskatchewan, with his two children and three cats, just a mile down the street from his on-again/off-again ladyfriend, who has not yet called the police.

He can be contacted by the angry, the insane, the melancholy, and the desperate at wbczolgosz@gmail.com

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