Perceptual Neuroscience: The Cerebral Cortex

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Harvard University Press, 1998 - Science - 486 pages

The cerebral cortex, occupying over 70 percent of our brain mass, is key to any understanding of the workings--and disorders--of the human brain. offering a comprehensive account of the role of the cerebral cortex in perception, this monumental work by one of the world's greatest living neuroscientists does nothing short of creating a new subdiscipline in the field: perceptual neuroscience.

For this undertaking, Vernon Mountcastle has gathered information from a vast number of sources reaching back through two centuries of investigation into the intrinsic operations of the cortex. His survey includes phylogenetic, comparative, and neuroanatomical studies of the neocortex; studies of the large-scale organization of the neocortex, of neuronal histogenesis and the specification of cortical areas, of synaptic transmission between neurons in cortical microcircuits, and of rhythmicity and synchronization in neocortical networks; and inquiries into the binding problem--how activities among the separate processing nodes of distributed systems coalesce in a coherent activity that we call perception.

The first book to summarize what is known about the physiology of the cortex in perception, Perceptual Neuroscience will be a landmark in the literature of neuroscience.

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Contents

Perception and the Cerebral Cortex
1
The Rise of Psychophysics
8
The Philosophical Position in Perceptual Neuroscience
14
The Allometric Equation BrainBody Relation
20
The Cortical Surface Has Increased by the Addition
27
Afferents from the Central Core and Basal
73
The Cytoarchitecture of the Neocortex
79
The Myeloarchitecture of the Neocortex
90
The Columnar Organization of the Neocortex
165
Physiological Studies of Homotypical Cortical Areas
185
Columniation by Intrinsic Connectivity
192
A Central Core System Projecting to the Cortex without
202
Secondary Events in Cortical Histogenesis and
227
Local Synaptogenesis and the Role of Activity in Refining
233
The Specification of Axonal Projections by Selective Collateral
240
The Rodent Model and the Peripheral Blueprint
249

The SingleTriggerZone Model of Central
109
Vesicular Biosynthesis Transport and Exocytosis
116
Summary
135
PostTetanic Potentiation
141
Is a Retrograde Signal Required to Initiate
150
Other Factors Influencing LTP
156
Summary
162
Analysis of the Patterns of Neocortical Connectivity
261
Are Microcircuits Uniform throughout the Neocortex?
372
References
383
Illustration Credits
459
Index
465
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Vernon B. Mountcastle, M.D., was University Professor of Neuroscience, Emeritus, at the Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute of Johns Hopkins University and winner of the 1998 National Academy of Sciences Award in Neurosciences.

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