The Waves

Front Cover
Harcourt, 2006 - Fiction - 270 pages
21 Reviews
The Waves is often regarded as Virginia Woolf's masterpiece, standing with those few works of twentieth-century literature that have created unique forms of their own. In deeply poetic prose, Woolf traces the lives of six children from infancy to death who fleetingly unite around the unseen figure of a seventh child, Percival. Allusive and mysterious, The Waves yields new treasures upon each reading.

Annotated and with an introduction by Molly Hite

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wellsie - LibraryThing

For the unprepared reader the first hundred pages can be as baffling as an unknown code. But once the code is cracked, the whole experiment has a brilliant simplicity. Imagine this: a biography of you ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wjmcomposer - LibraryThing

This is a difficult book, with it's non-linear narrative and interludes, many readers might be challenged if they're not used to this sort of thing. But it's a beautiful work, although for me, I began ... Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), one of the major literary figures of the twentieth century, transformed the art of the novel. The author of numerous novels, collections of letters, journals, and short stories, she was an admired literary critic and a master of the essay form.

Mark Hussey, general editor of Harcourt's new annotated Woolf series, is professor of English and women's and gender studies, and editor of the Woolf Studies Annual, at Pace University. He lives in Upper Nyack, New York.

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