The Waves

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2006 - Fiction - 270 pages
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The Waves is often regarded as Virginia Woolf's masterpiece, standing with those few works of twentieth-century literature that have created unique forms of their own. In deeply poetic prose, Woolf traces the lives of six children from infancy to death who fleetingly unite around the unseen figure of a seventh child, Percival. Allusive and mysterious, The Waves yields new treasures upon each reading.

Annotated and with an introduction by Molly Hite
 

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User Review  - sighedtosleep - LibraryThing

This is poetry, and life, and insecurity, and growing, maturing, and love, and work, and pain, and more poetry, and summer and winter and spring and fall, and friendship, and desire, and time, and memory, then death, while the waves crash on. Read full review

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Contents

Virginia Woolf
ix
Chronology
xix
Introduction
xxxv
The Waves
1
Notes to The Waves
221
Virginia Woolf
265
The Waves
269
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), one of the major literary figures of the twentieth century, transformed the art of the novel. The author of numerous novels, collections of letters, journals, and short stories, she was an admired literary critic and a master of the essay form.

Mark Hussey, general editor of Harcourt's new annotated Woolf series, is professor of English and women's and gender studies, and editor of the Woolf Studies Annual, at Pace University. He lives in Upper Nyack, New York.

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