Dombey and Son

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, 2002 - Fiction - 996 pages
0 Reviews
Charles Dickens's Dombey and Sonis a darkly witty tale of two siblings' struggle to achieve happiness in the shadow of their father's pride, edited with an introduction and notes by Andrew Sanders in Penguin Classics.To Paul Dombey, business is all and money can do anything. He runs his family life as he runs his firm- coldly, calculatingly and commercially. The only person he cares for is his frail son, grooming him for entry into the family business; his daughter Florence, abandoned and ignored, craves affection from her unloving father, who sees her only as a 'base coin that couldn't be invested'. As Dombey's callousness extends to others - from his defiant second wife Edith, to Florence's admirer Walter Gay - he sows the seeds of his own destruction. Can this heartless businessman be redeemed? A compelling depiction of a man imprisoned by his own pride, Dombey and Sonexplores the devastating effects of emotional deprivation on a dysfunctional family and on society as a whole.In his introduction, Andrew Sanders discusses the character of Paul Dombey, business and family relationships in Dombey and Sonand their similarities to Dickens's own childhood. This edition also includes a chronology, further reading, appendices, notes and the original illustrations by 'Phiz'.Charles Dickens is one of the best-loved novelists in the English language, whose 200th anniversary was celebrated in 2012. His most famous books, including Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfieldand The Pickwick Papers, have been adapted for stage and screen and read by millions. If you liked Dombey and Son, you might enjoy Dickens's Martin Chuzzlewit, also available in Penguin Classics.'There's no writing against such power as this - one has no chance' William Makepeace Thackeray

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2002)

Charles Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Landport, Portsea, England. He died in Kent on June 9, 1870. The second of eight children of a family continually plagued by debt, the young Dickens came to know not only hunger and privation, but also the horror of the infamous debtors' prison and the evils of child labor. A turn of fortune in the shape of a legacy brought release from the nightmare of prison and "slave" factories and afforded Dickens the opportunity of two years' formal schooling at Wellington House Academy. He worked as an attorney's clerk and newspaper reporter until his Sketches by Boz (1836) and The Pickwick Papers (1837) brought him the amazing and instant success that was to be his for the remainder of his life. In later years, the pressure of serial writing, editorial duties, lectures, and social commitments led to his separation from Catherine Hogarth after twenty-three years of marriage. It also hastened his death at the age of fifty-eight, when he was characteristically engaged in a multitude of work.

Andrew Sanders is Professor of English at the University of Durham. He has edited several Dickens novels and is the author of Charles Dickens: Resurrectionist (1982) and The Short Oxford History of English Literature (2000).

Bibliographic information