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PRACTICAL GRAMMAR

OF THE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE,

IN WHICH THE

PRINCIPLES ESTABLISHED BY LINDLEY MURRAY,

ARE INCULCATED, AND HIS

THEORY OF THE MOODS

CLEARLY ILLUSTRATED BY DIAGRAMS, REPRESENTING THE NUMBER OF TENSES
IN EACH MOOD -THEIR SIGNS-AND THE MANNER IN

WHICH THEY ARE FORMED.

SECOND EDITION, IMPROVED.

BY ROSCOE G. GREENE.

PORTLAND:

PUBLISHED BY SHIRLEY AND HYDE, EXCHANGE-STREET,

1830,

HARVARD
UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY
047*172

DISTRICT OE MAINE--TO WIT :

District Clerk's Office. et , the Independence of the United States of America, Mr. Thomas Todd, of said District, has deposited this office, the title of a book the right whereof be claims as proprietor in the words following, to wit:

“A Practical Grammar of the English Language, in which the Principles established by Lindley Murray, are inculcated, and bi. theory of the moods clearly illustrated by diagrams represente ing the number of tenses in each mood- their signs--and the manner in which they are formed.-Second edition, improved. By Roscoe G. Greene."

In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States, entitled " An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the cupies of Maps, charts and books, to the authors & proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned;” and also, to an act, entitled “ An Act supplementary to an act entitled An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books to the autbors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned : and for extending the benefits thereof to the arts of ds-igning, engraving and etching historical and other prints."

J. MUSSEY, Clerk of the District of Maine. A true copy as of record.

Ittest, J. MUSSEY, Clerk of the District of Maine.

RECOMMENDATIONS. " Messrs. SHIRLEY & HYDE.

Gentlemen--Having used Mr. GREENE'S GRAMMAR i, my school for a number of months past, I do not hesitate to say that for its simplicity and conciseness, the two most essential requisites in a Text Book for Schools, I consider it entiiled to a high degree of merit

JOSEPH LIBBY,” Teacher, Classical School. Portland, Feb. 26, 1830.

Portland English High School,

Feb. 25, 1830 TO THE PUBLISHERS.

Gentlemen,-1 caarot better express my opinion of R G. GREENE'S GRAMMAR, than by as. suring you that I highly approve the School Committee's selection of it for this school

J. M. PURINTON, Teacher.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

Having examined Mr. R. G. Greene's compilation of English Grammar, and tested its utility by actual experiment in my own school, I do not hesitate to say that I consider his arrangment of the subject-matter and particularly his manner of illustrating the Moods and Tensts, far preferable to any other system which I have seen. And I confidently be ieve that wherever his book is used, and his plan pursued, much labor will be saved, both to the Teacher and the Pupil. I therefore earnestly wish him success in his laudable undertaking, and confidently hope his industry will be liberally rewarded by the patronage of the public.

“HENRY JACKSON," Teacher of Monitorial School No. 1. Portland, Dec. 10, 1828,

The following remarks, from the Christian Mirror of June 6, are from the pen of Rev. Asa Cum

mings.

“ Mr. Greene's plan of teaching the English Grammar has the best of all recommendations to Sustain its pretensions—that of “successful experiment.” He commences with a familiar explanation of the noun, which is the only part of speech except the interjection, which can be explained unconnected with any other. When the noun, with its person, number and gender, is well understood; he explains the article and its uses, and then exercises the pupil on examples prepared for the purpose. He next takes up the adjective, explaining its variations, office, and connection with the noun, and exercising the pupil on a variety of examples composed of the article, adjective and noun. The next in his order is the active verb, which also is fully explained, and the office of a noun in the nominative case, as an actor, is illustrated by appropriate exercises. Into the next following lesson the adverb is introduced, and the examples for exercise con tain the adverb and the parts of speech before mentioned, thus combining what is new, at each step, with what has before been rendered familiar to the pupil. In this manner the pupil is carried forward, unembarrassed, and understandingly, from the simplest to the abstruser parts of this complicated science. He is prepared, by previous acquisitions, to comprehend each part, as it is successively presented to the mind. When all the parts of speech have been introduced, and their character, government, agreement, &c. are already understood-for which from ten to fifteen lessons are requisite—the pupil enters upon the study of the moods and tenses, in which the same regard to order in the arrangement of examples for exercise is observed, as in the introduction of the several parts of speech. In this perhaps the most difficult part of Grammar, the learner is assisted by Diagrams representing the moods and tenses, in which their various characteristics are impressed on the mind, by being presented to the eye. Their regular location in these Diagramas aided by the principle of association, is admirably adapted to favor their retention in the student's mind, as well as to facilitate his further progress.

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