Narrative of a second visit to Greece

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G.B. Whittaker, 1825 - Greece - 342 pages
 

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Page 27 - Mr. Parry desired him to compose himself. He shed tears, and, apparently, sunk into a slumber. Mr. Parry went away, expecting to find him refreshed on his return — but it was the commencement of the lethargy preceding his death. The last words I heard my master utter were at six o'clock on the evening of the 18th, when he said, « I must sleep now;" upon which he laid down never to rise again!
Page 26 - Here I told his Lordship, in a state of the greatest perplexity, that I had not understood a word of what he said ; to which he replied, " Oh, my God ! then all is lost, for it is now too late ! Can it be possible you have not understood me I" — " No, my Lord," said I ; " but I pray you to try and inform me once more.
Page 27 - My wife ! my child ! my sister ! you know all — you must say all — you know my wishes ;' the rest was quite unintelligible. A consultation was now held (about noon), when it was determined to administer some Peruvian bark and wine. My master had now been nine days without any sustenance whatever, except what I have already mentioned. With the exception of a few words which can only interest those to whom they were addressed, and which, if required, I shall communicate to themselves, it was impossible...
Page 26 - I begged him, however, to proceed with things of more consequence, he then continued, 'Oh, my poor dear child! — my dear Ada! my God, could I but have seen her! Give her my blessing — and my dear sister Augusta and her children; — and you will go to Lady Byron, and say tell her every thing — you are friends with her.
Page 26 - Shall I go my lord, and fetch pen, ink, and paper?' Oh! my God, no — you will lose too much time, and I have it not to spare, for my time is now short,' said his lordship, and immediately after, 'Now, pay attention;' his lordship commenced by saying, 'You will be provided for.
Page 24 - ... stomach, the only effect would be to create pain: indeed this must have been the case with a person in perfect health. The whole nourishment taken by my master, for the last eight days, consisted of a small quantity of broth at two or three different times, and two spoonfuls of arrowroot on the 18th, the day before his death. The first time I heard of there being any intention , of bleeding his Lordship was on the 15th, when it was proposed by Dr.
Page 44 - ... all this crowd of soldiers, ready at a moment to march against the implacable enemy of Christ and man, surrounded the funeral couch, and swore never to forget the sacrifices made by your father for us, and never to allow the spot where his heart is placed to be trampled upon by barbarous and tyrannical feet. Thousands of Christian voices were in a moment heard, and the temple of the Almighty...
Page 19 - I am a good deal better, though of course weakly ; the leeches took too much blood from my temples the day after, and there was some difficulty in stopping it ; but I have been up daily, and out in boats or on horseback ; today I have taken a warm bath, and live as temperately as well can be, without any liquid but water, and without any animal food.
Page 23 - ... complained more or less ever since we left Cephalonia, made this attack be more severely felt. Though rather feverish during the night, his lordship slept pretty well, but complained in the morning of a pain in his bones and a head-ache : this did not, however, prevent him from taking a ride in the afternoon, which I grieve to say was his last.
Page 20 - I am extremely obliged by your offer of your country house (as for all other kindness) in case that my health should require my removal; but I cannot quit Greece while there is a chance of my being of any (even supposed) utility: — there is a stake worth millions such as I am, and while I can stand at all, I must stand by the cause.

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