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(Repeat the gender, person, number, and case.) la is an irregular verb neuter, indicative mood, present tense, and the third person singular, agreeing with its nominative case “ house,” according to RULE 1. which says, &c. That is an adjective pronoun of the demonstrative kind. My is an adjective pronoun of the possessive kind. Brother's is a common substantive, of the third person, the singular number, and in the possessive case, governed by "house" understood, according to RULE Y. and a note under Rule VI. And is a copulative conjunction. Mine is a personal pronoun, of the first person, the singular number, and in the possessive case, according to a note under RULE x. and ap- . other under RULE VI. Who is a relative pronoup of the interrogative kind, of the plural number, in the nominative case, and relates to “we” following, according to a Rote under RULE VI. Inhabit is a regular verb 'active. (Repeat the mood, tense, person, &c.) It is a personal pronoun, of the third person, the singular number, and in the objective case, governed by the active verb inhabit," according to RULE XI. which says, &c. . We is a personal pronoun, of the first person, the plural number, and the nominative case to the verb “ inhabit” understood. The words “ inhabit it" are implied after “we," agreeably to a note under RULE VI.

“ Remember to assist the distressed." Remember is a regular verb active, imperative mood, the second person singular, and agrees with its nominative case

thou” understood. To assist is a regular verb active, in the infinitive mood, governed by the preceding verb “ remember,” according to RULE XII. which says, &c. The is the definite article. Distressed is an adjective put substantively.

* We are not unemployed." We is a personal pronoun. (Repeat the person, number, and case.)Are is an irregular verb neuter. (Repeut the mood, tense, person, &c.) Not is an adverb of negation. Unemployed is an adjective in the positive state. The two negatives not and un, form an affirmative, agreeably to RULE IVI. which says, &c.

“ This bounty has relieved yon and us; and has gratif

ed the donor." This is an adjective pronoun of the demonstrative kind. Bounty is a common substantive. (Repeat the person, number, and case.) Has relieved is a regular verb active, indicative mood, perfect tense, third person singular, agreeing with its nominative “ bounty,” according to Rule 1. which says, &c. You is a personal pronoun, of the second person plural, and in the objective case. (Repeat the godernment and rule.) And is a copulative conjunction. Us is a personal pronoun, in the objective case. You and us are put in the same case, according to RULE XVIII. which says, &c. And is a copulative conjunction. Has gratified is a regular verb active, indicative mood, perfect tense, and third person singular, agreeing with its nominative

bounty,” understood. Hlus relieved," and " Has gratifed," are in the same mood and tense, according to RULE XVIII. wbich says, &c. The is the definite article. Donor is a common substantive, of the third person, the singular number, and the objective case governed by the active verb “ has gratified,” according to Rule xi. which says, &c. See the Octavo Grammar, on Gender.

“ He will not be pardoned, unless he repent.” He is a personal pronoun, of the third person, singular number, masculine gender, and in the nominative case. Will be pardoned is a regular passive verb, indicative mood, first future tense, and the third person singular, agreeing with its nominative “he,” according to RULE 1. and composed of the auxiliaries “ will be," and the perfect par: ticiple "pardoned." Not is a negative adverb. Unless is a disjunctive conjunction. He is a personal pronoun (kepeat the person, number, gender, and case.) 'Repent is a regular verb Reuter, in the subjunctive mood, the present tense, the third person singular, and agrees with its nominative case he,” according to Rule 1. which says, &c. It is in the subjunctive mood, because it implies a future sense, and denotes uncertainty signified by the conjunction "unless," agreeably to Rule 19, and the notes.

“Good works being neglected, devotion is false." Good works being neglected, being independent of the

rest of the sentence, is the case absolute, according to the Gifth pote of Rule 1. Devotion is a common substantive, (Repeat the number, person, and case.) Is is an irregular verb neuter. (Repeat the mood, tense, person, &-c.) False is an adjective in the positive state, and belongs to its substantive “ devotion" understood, agreeably to Rule viii. which

says, &c.

“The emperor, Marcus Aurelius, was a wise and vir.

tuous prince.” The is the definite article. Emperor is a common sub, stantive, of the masculine gender, the third person, ihe singular number, and in the nominative case. Marcus Awelius is a proper name or substantive, and in the nominative case, because it is put in apposition with the substantive " emperor," agreeably to the first note of Rule . Was is an irregular verb neuter, indicative mood, imperfect tense, and the third person singular, agreeing with its nominative case emperor." A is the indefinite article. Wise is an adjective, and belongs to its substantive “prince." And is a copulative conjunction. Virtu ous is an adjective, and belongs, &c. Prince is a common substantive, and in the nominative case, agreeably to the fourth note of Rule XI.

“To err is human.” To err, is the infinitive mood, and the nominative case to the verb “is.” is an irregular verb neuter, indicative mood, present tense, and the third person singular, agreeing with its nominative case "to err," agreeably to Note 1, under Rule the first. Human is an adjective, and belongs to its substantive “ nature” understood, according to Rule 8. which says, &c. To countenance persons who are guilty of bad ac

tions, is scarcely one remove from actually commit

ting them.” To countenance persons who are guilty of bad actions, is part of a sentence, which is the nominative case to the verb “ is.” Is is an irregular verb neuter, &c. agreeing with the aforementioned part of a sentence, as its nominative case, agreeably to Note 1, under Rule the first Scarcely is an adverb. One is a numeral adjective agree

ing with its substantive “ remove.' Remove is a com mon substantive, of the neuter gender, the third person, the singular number, and in the nominative case, agreeably to the fourth note of Rule XI. From is a preposition. Committing is the present participle of the regular active verb “ to commit.” Them is a personal pronoun, of the third person, the plural number, and in the objective case, governed by the participle “ committing," agreeably to Rule xiv. which

says,

&c.

“ Let me proceed." This sentence, according to the statement of grammarians in general, is in the Imperative mood, of the first person, and the singular number. The sentence may, however, be analyzed in the following manner.

Let is an irregular verb active, in the imperative mood, of the second person, the plural number, and agrees with its nominative case you” understood : as, “ do you let.”

Me is a personal pronoun, of the first person, the singular Bumber, and in the objective case, governed by the active

verb “ let,” agreeably to Rule xi. which says, &c. Proceed is a regular verb neuter, in the infinitive mood, governed by the preceding verb “let,” according to Rule xii. which says, &c.

Living expensively and luxuriously destroys health. By living frugally and temperately, health is preserved."

Living expensively and luxuriously, is the nominative case to the verb " destroys," agreeably to Note 1, under Rule 1. Living frugally and temperately, is a substantive phrase in the objective case, governed by the preposition" by," according to Note 2, under Rule xiv.

The preceding specimens of parsing, if carefully studied by the learner, seem to be sufficiently explicit, to enable him to comprehend the nature of this employment; and sufficiently diversified, to qualify him, in other exercises, to point out and apply the remaining rules, both principal and subordinate.

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PART IV.

PROSODY.

Prosody consists of two parts: the former teaches the true PRONUNCIATion of words, comprising ACCENT, QUANTITY, EMPHASIS, PAUSE, and TONE ; and the latter, the laws of VERSIFICATION.

CHAPTER I.

OF PRONUNCIATION.

Section 1. Of Accent. Accent is the laying of a peculiar stress of the voice, on a certain letter or syllable in a word, that it mау.

be better heard than the rest, or distinguished from them: as, in the word presvime, the stress of the voice must be on the letter u, and second syllable, sume, which take the accent.

As words may be formed of a different number of syllaLles, from one to eight or nine, it was necessary to have some peculiar mark to distinguish words from mere syllables; otherwise speech would be only a continued succession of syllables, without conveying ideas; for, as words are the marks of ideas, any confusion in the marks, must cause the same in the ideas for which they stand. It was therefore necessary, that the mind should at once perceive what number of syllables belongs to each word, in utterance. This might be done by a perceptible pause at the end of each word in speaking, as we forin a certain distance between them in writing and printing. But this would make discourse extremely tedious; and thongh it might render words distinct, would make the meaning of

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