Didactics: Social, Literary, and Political, Volume 1

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Carey, Lea & Blanchard, 1836 - Conduct of life
 

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Page 39 - They sin who tell us Love can die. With life all other passions fly, All others are but vanity. In Heaven Ambition cannot dwell, Nor Avarice in the vaults of Hell ; Earthly these passions of the Earth, They perish where they have their birth ; But Love is indestructible. Its holy flame for ever burneth, From Heaven it came, to Heaven returneth...
Page 28 - Friend ! may each domestic bliss be thine ! Be no unpleasing melancholy mine : Me, let the tender office long engage, To rock the cradle of reposing age, With lenient arts extend a mother's breath, Make languor smile, and smooth the bed of death, Explore the thought, explain the asking eye, And keep awhile one parent from the sky...
Page 250 - Soon shall thy arm, unconquered steam, afar Drag the slow barge, or drive the rapid car ; Or on wide waving wings expanded bear The flying chariot through the fields of air ; — Fair crews triumphant, leaning from above, Shall wave their fluttering kerchiefs as they move, Or warrior bands alarm the gaping crowd, And armies shrink beneath the shadowy cloud.
Page 51 - A man cannot speak to his son but as a father; to his wife but as a husband; to his enemy but upon terms ; whereas a friend may speak as the case requires, and not as it sorteth with the person.
Page 240 - A lightless sulphur, choak'd with smoky fogs Of an infected darkness : in this place Dwell many thousand thousand sundry sorts Of never-dying deaths : there damned souls Roar without pity ; there are gluttons fed With toads and adders ; there is burning oil...
Page 51 - I mean aid, and bearing a part in all actions and occasions. Here the best way to represent to life the manifold use of friendship, is to cast and see how many things there are which a man cannot do himself; and then it will appear that it was a sparing speech of the ancients to say, "that a friend is another himself;" for that a friend is far more than himself.
Page 164 - Shakespeare it is commonly a species. " It is from this wide extension of design that so much instruction is derived. It is this which fills the plays of Shakespeare with practical axioms and domestic wisdom. It was said of Euripides that every verse was a precept; and it may be said of Shakespeare that from his works may be collected a system of civil and economical prudence.
Page 254 - To be attached to the subdivision, to love the little platoon we belong to in society, is the first principle (the germ as it were) of public affections. It is the first link in the series by which we proceed towards a love to our country, and to mankind.
Page 63 - What then remains, but well our power to use, And keep good humour still whate'er we lose ? And trust me, dear, good humour can prevail, When airs, and flights, and screams, and scolding fail. Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may roll ; Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.
Page 84 - ... nothing will supply the want of prudence; and that negligence and irregularity, long continued, will make knowledge useless, wit ridiculous, and genius contemptible.

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