The Cambridge History of China: Volume 6, Alien Regimes and Border States, 907-1368

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Denis C. Twitchett, Herbert Franke, John King Fairbank
Cambridge University Press, 1978 - History - 864 pages
"The Cambridge History of China is the largest and most comprehensive history of China in the English language. Planned in the 1960s by the late, distinguished China scholar Professor John K. Fairbank of Harvard, and Denis Twitchett, Professor Emeritus of Princeton, the series covers the grand scale of Chinese history from the 3rd century BC, to the death of Mao Tse-tung. Consisting of fifteen volumes (two of which, Volumes 5 and 9 are to be published in two books), the history embodies both existing scholarship and extensive original research into hitherto neglected subjects and periods. The contributors, all specialists from the international community of Sinologists, cover the main developments in political, social, economic and intellectual life of China in their respective periods. Collectively they present the major events in a long history that encompasses both a very old civilisation and a great modern power. Written not only for students and scholars, but with the general reader in mind, the volumes are designed to be read continuously, or as works of reference. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary; for readers with Chinese, proper names and terms are identified with their characters in the glossary, and full references to Chinese, Japanese, and other works are given in the bibliographies. Numerous maps illustrate the texts. The published volumes have constituted essential reading in Chinese history. See also, The Cambridge History of Ancient China, Michael Loewe and Edward Shaughnessy, eds., a companion to this series covering the period 1500 to 221 BC. General Editors: John K. Fairbank, Denis Twitchett." --
 

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User Review  - AndreasJ - LibraryThing

An excellent account of the conquest dynasties of the 10th to 14th centuries; Liao, Xi Xia, Jin, and Yuan. Read full review

Contents

Introduction i
1
The frontier
7
Vassals and overlords
14
Modes of government
21
Multilinguality
30
The Han Chinese under alien domination
36
The Liao
43
The background of Apaochis rise to power
53
the reign of Mongke 1251 1259
390
The empire on the eve of civil war
411
Khubilai and China 12531259
418
Foreign expansion
429
Social and economic policies
445
Khubilai as emperor of China
454
Khubilai and Chinese culture
465
Preservation of the Mongolian heritage
471

Apaochi becomes the new khaghan and ascends
60
The succession crisis and the reign of Taitsung
68
The succession of Shihtsung
75
The reign of Mutsung 951969
81
The Hsi Hsia
154
The Tangut move toward independence 9821002
168
The succession to Weiming Yiianhao
189
The last years of the Hsia state and the Mongolian conquest
205
The reign of Akuta and the founding of the Chin dynasty
220
The political history of Chin after 1142
235
The annihilation of Chin 1215 1234
259
The rise of the Mongolian empire and Mongolian rule
321
Chinggis khan and the early Mongolian state 12061227
342
the reigns of Ogodei
365
The regime of Sangha and economic and religious abuses
478
Khubilais last years
488
Shunti and the end of Yuan rule in China
561
Toghon Temiirs enthronement and Bayans chancellorship
572
The disintegration of the Yuan
580
The Yiian government and society
587
Society
608
Chinese society under Mongol rule 12151368
616
Socialpsychological factors
622
Bihliographical essays
665
Bihliography
727
GlossaryIndex
777
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