Marine Biology: An Ecological Approach

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Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 2005 - Science - 579 pages
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Marine Biology: An Ecological Approach emphasizes the ecological principles that guide marine life throughout all environments within the world's oceans. Authors James Nybakken and Mark Bertness provide a unique ecological approach that helps students understand the real-world relevance of marine biology by exploring how organisms interact within their individual ecosystems. The text is organized by habitat, not classification, with each habitat receiving detailed, in-depth coverage that draws students into the subject matter. In addition, new co-author Mark Bertness's expertise and familiarity with East Coast marine life adds a balanced dimension to the coverage of the Atlantic and Pacific environments.

In addition to a new Taxonomic Appendix containing a detailed map of marine taxonomy, the Sixth Edition is fully updated with the latest research data and topics. These include new coverage of the intertidal zone, salt marshes and estuaries, and tropical communities, as well as a revised discussion of humans' impact on the sea. The new edition's pedagogy features end-of-chapter summaries, a full-color design, and a companion website designed just for students.

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Contents

H A P T E R
1
BASIC OCEANOGRAPHY
7
SOME ECOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES
19
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

James W. Nybakken is a professor of biological sciences at the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, a consortium operation of seven of the California State Universities. His research interests are in the feeding ecology of certain groups of predatory marine gastropod molluscs. Dr. Nybakken is a fellow of the California Academy of Sciences and has served as an officer in five scientific societies.

Mark D. Bertness is the chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Brown University, where he has taught for 25 years. His areas of expertise include the ecology and conservation of natural shoreline communities, as well as salt-marsh and rocky-shore ecology and conservation, which he has studied extensively in South America. Dr. Bertness earned his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in 1979.

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