Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

NEW YORK: F. C. BROWNELL. PHILADELPHIA: J. B. LIPPINCOTT &

BOSTON: E. P. DUTTON.
LONDON, TRÜBNER & co., 64 PATERNOSTER ROW.

1863,

с 62589

LIBRARY Leland Stanford, Jr. L'NIVERSITY

THE

(NEW SERIES, no.

No. XXVIII-SEPTEMBER, 1862.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small]
[blocks in formation]
[merged small][ocr errors]

MILITARY SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION.

An account of the Military and Naval Schools of different countries, with special reference to the extension and improvement, among ourselves, of similar institutions and agencies, both national and state, for the special training of officers and men for the exigencies of war, was promised by the Editor in his original announcement of “The American Journal and Library of Education." Believing that the best preparation for professional and official service of any kind, either of peace or war, is to be made in the thorough culture of all manly qualities, and that all special schools should rest on the basis, and rise naturally out of a general system of education for the whole community, we devoted our first efforts to the fullest exposition of the best principles and methods of elementary instruction, and to improvements in the organization, teaching, and discipline of schools, of different grades, but all designed to give a proportionate culture of all the faculties. We have from time to time introduced the subject of Scientific Schools--or of institutions in which the principles of mathematics, mechanics, physics, and chemistry are thoroughly mastered, and their applications to tho more common as well as higher arts of construction, machinery, manufactures, and agriculture, are experimentally taught. In this kind of instruction must we look for the special training of our engineers, both civil and military; and schools of this kind established in every state, should turn out every year a certain number of candidates of suitable age to compete freely in open examinations for admission to a great National School, like the Polytechnic at Paris, or the purely scientific course of the Military Academy at West Point, and then after two years of severe study, and having been found qualified by repeated examinations, semi-annual and final, by a board composed, not of honorary visitors, but of experts in each science, should pass to schools of application or training for the special service for which they have a natural aptitude and particular preparation.

The terrible realities of our present situation as a people--the fact that within a period of twelve months a million of able bodied men have been summoned to arms from the peaceful occupations of the office, the shop, and the field, and are now in hostile array, or in actual conflict, within the limits of the United States, and the no less alarming aspect of the future, arising not only from the delicate position of our own relations with foreign governments, but from the armed interference of the great Military Powers of Europe in the internal affairs of a neighboring republic, have brought up the subject of MILITARY SCHOOLS, AND MILITARY EDUCATION, for consideration and action with an urgency which admits of no delay. Something must and will be done at once. And in reply to numerous letters for information and suggestions, and to enable those who are urging the National, State or Municipal authorities to provide additional facilities for military instruction, or who may propose to establish schools, or engraft on existing schools exercises for this purpose,—to profit by the experience of our own and other countries, in the work of training officers and men for the Art of War, we shall bring together into a single volume, “ Papers on Military Education," which it was our intention to publish in successive numbers of the New SERIES of the “ American Journal of Education."

« PreviousContinue »