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Resemble not the panther's treacherous seeming,

That looks so lovely to beguile its prey;
Seek not to match the basilisk's false gleaming,

That charms the fancy only to betray.
See the great Sun! God's best and brightest creaturo •

Alike on good and ill his gifts he showers :
Look at the Earth, whose large and liberal nature,

To all who court her offers fruits and flowers.
Then, lady, lay aside that haughty scorning-

A robe unmeet to deck a mortal frame; Mild be thy light, and innocent as morning,

And shine on high and humble still the same. Bid thy good-will, in bright abundauce flowing

To all around its kindly stream impart; Thy love the while on One alone bestowing,

The fittest found, the object of thy heart!

A PLEASANT DISPOSITION.

Take all the forms of wealth and ease,
Of pleasure rife in all degrees
Yet life will us forever-tease,
Without a pleasant disposition.
The varied scenes of life complex-
The fondest love of either sex-
Yet trials will forever vex-
Without a pleasant disposition.

Be then our study and delight,
From rose-lip'd morn till sable night,

To gain the prize so fair and bright,
A sweet and pleasant disposition.
Our cup will then be filled with joy,
And pleasure ere without alloy,
No clouds to dim-no cheer to cloy,
An even-tempered disposition.

SPEAK GENTLY.

Speak gently: it is better far

To rule by love than fear,
Speak gently: let no harsh words mar
The good we might do here.

Speak gently: love doth whisper low

The vows that true hearts bind; And gently friendship’s accents flow,

Affection's voice is kind.

Speak gently to the little child,

Its love be sure to gain;
Teach it in accents soft and mild,
It

may not long remain.
Speak gently to the young, for they

Will have enough to bear,
Pass through this life as best we may

'Tis full of anxious care.

Speak gently to the aged one,

Grieve not the care-worn heart,
The sands of life are nearly run,

Let such in peace depart.

Speak gently, kindly, to the poor,

Let no harsh tone be heard ;
They have enough they must enduro

Without an unkind word.

Speak gently to the erring—know

They must have toiled in yain;
Perchance unkindness made them so

Oh! win.them back again.

Speak gently! He who gave his life

To bend man's stubborn will,
When elements were fierce with strife,

Said to them, “ Peace, be still."

Speak gently : 'tis a little thing

Dropped in the heart's deep well;
The good, the joy which it may bring

Eternity alone shall tell.

SPEAK NOT TO HIM A BITTER WORD

Would'st thou a wanderer reclaim ?
A wild and restless spirit tame?
Check the warm flow of youthful blood,
And lead a lost one back to God?
Pause, if thy spirit's wrath be stirr'd,
Speak not to him a bitter word.
Speak not! that bitter word may be
The stamp that seals his destiny !

If wildly he hath gone astray,
And dark excess has marked his way
"Tis pitiful—but yet beware!
Reform must come from kindly care.

Forbid thy parting lips to move,
But in the gentle tones of love.
Though sadly his young heart hath err’d,
Speak not to him a bitter word.

The lowering frown he will not bear,
The venom'd chidings will not hear;
The ardent spirit will not brook
The stinging touch of sharp rebuke.
Thou would'st not goad the restless steed,
To calm his fire or check his speed,
Then let no angry tones be heard,
Speak not to him a bitter word.
Go kindly to him-make him feel,
Your heart yearns deeply for his weal;
Tell him the dangers thick that lay
Around his “ wildly devious way”—
So shalt thou win him, call him back,
From pleasure's smooth, seductive track,
And warnings thou hast mildly given,
May guide the wanderer up to heaven.

SCOLDING.

" A great deal of injury is done to children by their parents scolding. Many children have been nearly or quite ruined by it, and often driven from home, to become vagabonds and wanderers, by scolding. It sours your temper, provided it is sweet, which is a question ; if you scold, the more you will have to scold, and because you have become crosser, and your chil

dren likewise. Scolding alienates the hearts of your children. Depend upon it, they cannot love you as well after you have berated them, as they did before. You may approach them with firmness and decision, you may punish them with severity adequate to the nature of their offences, and they will feel the justice of your conduct, and love you notwithstanding all. But they hate scolding. It stirs up the bad blood, while it discloses your weakness, and lowers you in their estimation. Especially at night, when they are about to retire, their hearts should be melted and moulded with voices of kindness, that they may go to their slumbers with thoughts of love stealing around their souls, and whispering peace.”—N.Y. Evangelist.

DOING GOOD.

A few years since, a wealthy gentleman of Paris, who lived in idleness, at length became weary of life, and left his house one evening, with the intention of drowning himself in the river Seine; it being yet twilight when he arrived at its bank, he concluded to walk about a short time, till it was darker, so that he should not be discovered. While thus engaged, he put his hand in his pocket, and felt a purse, which was filled with gold; he concluded to go and find

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