Case studies in the achievement of air superiority

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DIANE Publishing
 

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Contents

IV
V
65
VI
115
VII
179
VIII
223
IX
271
X
323
XI
383
XII
453
XIII
505
XIV
563
XV
609
XVI
627
XVII
633
Copyright

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Page 376 - Samuel Eliot Morison, History of United States Naval Operations in World War II, Vol.
Page 208 - The leaders of the three Great Powers — the Soviet Union, the United States of America and Great Britain — have agreed that in two or three months after Germany has surrendered and the war in Europe has terminated...
Page 132 - Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.
Page 113 - The Impact of Air Power on the International Scene: 19331940," Military Affairs, Summer 1955, pp. 65-71 ; Telford Taylor, The March of Conquest (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1958), pp. 24-30; and Adolf Galland, The First and the Last (New York: Ballantine Books, 1954), chs.
Page 50 - Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jim Jul Aug Sep...
Page 279 - Germany was also approved, aimed at 'the progressive destruction and dislocation of the German military, industrial and economic system, and the undermining of the morale of the German people to a point where their capacity for armed resistance is fatally weakened'.
Page 631 - Professor of Military History at the US Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.
Page 92 - The intelligence estimate ended in the confident assertion that the Luftwaffe is clearly superior to the RAF as regards strength, equipment, training, command and location of bases. In the event of an intensification of air warfare the Luftwaffe, unlike the RAF, will be in a position in every respect to achieve a decisive effect this year...
Page 75 - ... supplies, corresponding to the newly established units, rearmed units, and transferred units. . .The compression of these tasks into a very short time span has once more and in clear fashion pointed out the known lack of readiness in maintenance of flying equipment as well as in technical personnel.3 Neither air arm was prepared for the war which would come.

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