Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Front Cover
Puffin Books, 1997 - Adventure stories, English - 169 pages
Suddenly . . .
from underneath the wrapper . . .
there came a brilliant flash of gold.

Charlie's irresistible story begins when he finds one of Mr Willy Wonka's precious Golden Tickets in his bar of chocolate and wins a magical day at the mysterious chocolate factory . . .

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - villemezbrown - LibraryThing

Continuing my Banned Book Week tradition of reading something from the list of challenged or banned books. Due to my obsession with reading comic books when I was a child (18,000 by the time I was 18 ... Read full review

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User Review  - Shannon.Allen - LibraryThing

I can't get past the fact that children were being murdered in this whackadoo's candy factory. I liked the descriptions of the imaginary Oompa Loompa world and people, as well as much of the details ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

When he was at school Roald Dahl received terrible reports for his writing - with one teacher actually writing in his report, 'I have never met a boy who so persistently writes the exact opposite of what he means. He seems incapable of marshalling his thoughts on paper!' After finishing school Roald Dahl, in search of adventure, travelled to East Africa to work for a company called Shell. In Africa he learnt to speak Swahili, drove from diamond mines to gold mines, and survived a bout of malaria where his temperature reached 105.5 degrees (that's very high!). With the outbreak of the Second World War Roald Dahl joined the RAF. But being nearly two metres tall he found himself squashed into his fighter plane, knees around his ears and head jutting forward. Tragically of the 20 men in his squadron, Roald Dahl was one of only three to survive. Roald wrote about these experiences in his books Boyand Going Solo. Later in the war Roald Dahl was sent to America. It was there that he met famous author C.S. Forester (author of the Captain Hornblower series) who asked the young pilot to write down his war experiences for a story he was writing. Forester was amazed by the result, telling Roald 'I'm bowled over. Your piece is marvellous. It is the work of a gifted writer. I didn't touch a word of it.' (an opinion which would have been news to Roald's early teachers!). Fore

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