Ireland Under English Rule: Or, A Plea for the Plaintiff, Volume 1

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G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1903 - Ireland - 692 pages

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Contents

CHAPTER X
172
O
188

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Page 66 - ... ere one year and a half they were brought to such wretchedness, as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death, they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 250 - Fourthly, the legislative cannot transfer the power of making laws to any other hands, for it being but a delegated power from the people, they who have it cannot pass it over to others.
Page 260 - I have been charged with that importance, in the efforts to emancipate my country, as to be considered the key-stone of the combination of Irishmen, or as your Lordship expressed it, "the life and blood of the conspiracy.
Page 110 - Second : and their majesties, as soon as their affairs will permit them to summon a parliament in this kingdom, will endeavour to procure the said Roman Catholics such further security in that particular, as may preserve them from any disturbance upon the account of their said religion.
Page 118 - That a claim of any body of men, other than the king, lords, and commons of Ireland to make laws to bind this kingdom, is unconstitutional, illegal, and a grievance.
Page 251 - ... might the frantic suicide hope that the act which destroys his miserable body, should extinguish his eternal soul Again I therefore warn you, do not dare to lay your hands on the constitution ; it is above your power.
Page 69 - And no spectacle was more frequent in the ditches of towns, and especially in wasted countries, than to see multitudes of these poor people dead with their mouths all coloured green by eating nettles, docks, and all things they could rend up above ground.
Page 137 - It was a machine of wise and elaborate contrivance ; and as well fitted for the oppression, impoverishment, and degradation of a people, and the debasement, in them, of human nature itself, as ever proceeded from the perverted ingenuity of man.
Page 230 - Neither was it mine adversary that did magnify himself against me; for then peradventure I would have hid myself from him : 14 But it was even thou, my companion, my guide, and mine own familiar friend.
Page 46 - Adrian the bishop, the servant of the servants of God, to his most dear son in Christ, the noble king of England, sendeth greeting and apostolick benediction.

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