The Land of Promise: Being an Authentic and Impartial History of the Rise and Progress of the New British Province of South Australia ... Embracing Also a Full Account of the South Australian Company, with Hints to Various Classes of Emigrants and Numerous Letters from Settlers

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Libraries Board of South Australia, 1839 - South Australia - 224 pages
 

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Page 204 - ... South Australia will furnish, not only a happy and prosperous home for thousands of England's sons, and of the ' finest peasantry in the world,' whose condition, from circumstances which need not here be inquired into, presents the anomaly, in a period of civilization, of a starving people in the midst of plenty ; but that the colonization of South Australia will furnish to civilization another resting-place, whence she may spread her magic influence over a large and hitherto untrodden portion...
Page 132 - Sittishness prevails over the lower orders,* and irreligion over the mass. I trust, however, as the community gets more organized, men's habits will grow more regular. I am pleased to say the clergyman is evangelical and active. The Methodists, too, I rejoice to add, have a society, and are doing good. I have been kindly received by all persons, and hope, by God's grace, *
Page 6 - I will now conclude. I venture to hope, that, in the course of the observations which I have made, I have proved, to the satisfaction of your Lordship, the expediency of an extensive Emigration from Ireland to the colonies. Such an Emigration, judiciously conducted, would. I am fully persuaded, be the appropriate remedy — the true specific, for the deep-seated disease which infects our social system. It would remove the difficulties which now render improvement impossible; it would prepare the...
Page 4 - ... his hands the destinies of millions of people of every clime and every race ; and whose office, being a political one, is changed with every change of ministry — the present possessor of the office being the seventh in seven years. Now, in the Act by which South Australia was founded, almost the entire management of the colony is vested in a board of commissioners, whose whole attention is devoted to the subject. In the old colonies...
Page 78 - However listless the individual, lying half asleep perhaps, as they usually are when not intent on game, set him to this dance and he is fired with sudden energy; every nerve is strung to such a degree that he is no longer to be recognised as the same individual, until he ceases to dance, and comes to you again.
Page 195 - During the early infancy of the colony, the most important part of your duty will be to take care that no labouring emigrant falls into a state of destitution. For this purpose, you are authorized to provide a maintenance for all such persons, and their families, until they shall have obtained, or whenever they shall be without, employment, at wages adequate to their support ; requiring, in return for such maintenance, that they shall labour upon the public works, as may be agreed upon between the...
Page 124 - ... for every additional foot. The dues and the charges payable to the harbour-master for repairing on board and appointing the place of anchorage of vessels entering Port Adelaide, or for the removal of the same from one place of anchorage or mooring to another, not being for the purpose of leaving the port (vessels registered in the province under fifty tons, or while employed in the coasting trade of the province, excepted), are, — . d.
Page 5 - ... irresistible, that a well regulated Emigration to British America would, in a short period, not only replace the advances by which it had been effected, but would bestow upon the unappropriated lands in the neighbourhood of its locations, an exchangeable value, which would yield a clear revenue to the state. With respect to our Australian colonies, the evidence, that an extensive Emigration to them would replace its own expenses, is even more direct. The prosperity of the United States, and of...
Page 112 - The only obstacle," he continued, " which seemed at first sight to interpose itself, was the presumed difficulty of procuring in so new a colony, a sufficient number of intelligent gentlemen to take upon them the highly important duties which you will have to discharge. That difficulty was, however, at once obviated in my mind, after I had been a few days amongst you, and I had seen and conversed with the very many most respectable colonists whom I have had the pleasure of meeting in private society...

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