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Answer. In times of conflict or crisis, the Theater Special Operations Command (TSOC)s provide theater commanders a Joint Special Operations Task Force Headquarters (JSOTF) to plan and conduct Special Operations. Traditionally, TSOCs form the core of the JSOTF headquarters but must be augmented to be fully capable. For execution of the War on Terrorism, the functions of the TSOC and JSOTF expand from planning and coordinating SOF support to actually planning and executing the war on terrorism (WOT) campaign for the theater commander. TSOCs must be structured to support command and control of multiple JSOTFs when required.

Question. Why are there no personnel assigned to Northern Command?

Answer. Special operations forces (SOF) personnel are assigned to Northern Command (NORTHCOM), with more arriving this summer. NORTHCOM and United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) conducted a manpower study and has tentatively agreed on a 17-man Special Operations Detachment. Currently, NORTHCOMs entire (not just SOF) manning document is still being worked.

Question. Why are no additional personnel being requested for the Southern Command?

Answer. United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) did request additional personnel for Special Operations Command South (SOCSOUTH), but the increase was not approved.

Central Command (CENTCOM)

Question. The Committee is aware that SOCOM plans to forward base forces including a Crisis Response Element (CRE) in the CENTCOM area of responsibility. Where will these forces be stationed?

Answer. In the Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR), decisions on an exact location for forces in theater have not been finalized, but proposed locations will be in the Persian Gulf region.

Question. How many forces will be required?

Answer. United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) plans to forward base the following special operations forces (SOF) in the Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR):

1 Theater Special Operations Command 152

4 MH53s or MH47s, 3 MC-130s, Joint Special Operations Air Component

(JSOAC), STS (These forces combine to make up the Air Component) 313

1 SEAL platoon with Command and Control (C&C) and Ground Mobility Vehicles (GMV) 24

1 SF Co mounted 130

Total personnel 619

Question. What will be the costs associated with this initiative?

Answer. The Major Force Program (MFP)-11 costs associated with this initiative were funded in Program Decision Memorandum (PDM) I. The Central Command (CENTCOM) Forward Presence section of the PDM funded additional MC130s, additional SEAL Teams, deployment costs, NAVSPECWARCOM Ground Mobility Detachments, and acceleration of HMMWV conversions into Ground Mobility Vehicles for United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC). The LD/HD section of the Program Decision Memorandum (PDM) funded additional MH47s that will support the Crisis Response Element (CRE) and the Strategic Planning Capability and Theater Special Operations Commands section of the PDM funded additional operations and maintenance (O&M) for Special Operations Command Central (SOCCENT). The total force structure funded by PDM I was required to establish an adequate rotational base to support those forces listed in paragraph 2 above. The total funding in PDM I related to this initiative was $2.7 billion.

Question. Will they report to the CENTCOM commander or will they report to USSOCOM?

Answer. Central Command (CENTCOM) exercises operational control (OPCON) of the Crisis Response Element (CRE) through the Theatre Special Operations Command (TSOC). The CRE was established in order to provide the theater with a crisis response capability permanently located within the area of responsibility (AOR).

Question. Will similar Crisis Response elements be established at EUCOM? PACOM?

Answer. There is no requirement to establish Crisis Response Elements (CRE)s in the other combatant command areas of responsibility (AOR)s. Each has permanently assigned special operations forces (SOF) which serve as the theater "in-extreme" force. With the establishment of the Central Command (CENTCOM) CRE, all theater combatant commands now have the capability to respond to crises with SOF already present in theater. The CENTCOM CRE was established because CENTCOM was the only theater combatant command without a permanently assigned "in-extreme" capability.

Question. How will the establishment of these Crisis Response elements enhance the current capabilities of the Commander of USSOCOM to perform his responsibilities?

Answer. The Central Command (CENTCOM) Crisis Response Element (CRE) and "inextremis" forces assigned to the other theaters provide both the geographic combatant commanders and the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) Commander with a rapidly deployable special operations forces (SOF) element when emerging high value targets are identified and located during the prosecution of the War on Terrorism. These elements, and others, will provide the capability to respond quickly and effectively to time sensitive targets.

Central Command Aviation And SEAL Components

Question. The Committee is aware that SOCOM plans to establish an aviation component and two SEAL teams in the Central Command Area of Responsibility. What aircraft will this aviation component fly?

Answer. The Central Command (CENTCOM) Aviation Component will have four (4) MH-53M or MH-47G helicopters and 3 MC-130s.

Question. Are they currently in the inventory?

Answer. There are no MH—47Gs off of the mod line yet. The first one comes off in FY 2005.

Question. How many forces will be required to forward base this element in the CENTCOM area of responsibility?

Answer. The Department resourced 313 (out of a total of 410 for ARSOA plus up) people for the aviation component.

Question. What will be the costs associated with this initiative?

Answer. FY 2004 cost is $132 million.

Question. Is the equipment for the two new SEAL teams currently in the inventory?

Answer. No, however the Department has provided funds for the equipment for these two Teams within the Future Years Defense Program.

Question. How many personnel will be required to forward base these teams in the CENTCOM area of responsibility?

Answer. United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) plans to forward base the following special operations forces (SOF) forces in the Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR):

1 Theater SOC 152

4 MH53s or MH47s, 3 MC-130s, Joint Special Operations Air Component

(JSOAC), STS (These forces combine to make up the Air Component) 313

1 SEAL platoon with Command and Control (C&C) and Ground! Mobility Vehicles (GMV) 24

1 SF Co mounted 130

Total personnel 619

New Psychological Operations Companies

Question. The Committee is aware that SOCOM plans to establish two new active and four reserve regional Psychological Operations Companies. Please describe the mission of the current Psychological Operations Companies including their end strength.

Answer. The two new active component (AC) Psychological Operations I PSYOP) Companies will conduct theater PSYOP in Central Command (CENTCOM) and Pacific Command (PACOM) with a combined total end strength of 154 soldiers. The four reserve component (RC) PSYOP Companies will conduct tactical PSYOP with Ground forces wherever they are deployed. Total RC end strength of 308 RC soldiers.

Question. Where are they located?

Answer. The two active component (AC) and four reserve component (RC) Psychological Operations (PSYOP) Companies will be located at Fort Bragg, North Carolina the RC companies are part of the multi-composition (RC/AC) units.

Question. Where will the new Psychological Operations Companies be located?

Answer. The new Psychological Operations (PSYOP) Companies will be located at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Question. What will be the costs associated with this initiative?

Answer. Funding in the amount of $205 million across the Future Year Defense Plan (FYDP) was received for the Psychological Operations (PSYOPS) initiative; $99 million in operation and maintenance (O&M); $71 million in Procurement; $31 million in research, development, test and evaluation (RDT&E), and $4 million in Military Construction (MILCON).

Special Operations Procurement Budget

Question. The President's budget proposes to increase the Special Operations Procurement budget by 126% from $873.3 million in Fiscal year 2003 to $1,978.5 million in Fiscal year 2004. This increase is in addition to the $691 million for the procurement of items provided by the Congress above the budget through the DERF and the Supplemental during fiscal year 2002, and what has been included in the Fiscal year 2003 supplemental budget request. The fiscal year 2002 increases above the budget were added in response to the events which occurred on September 11th. They were intended to provide Special Forces operators with items which could be procured quickly to meet unanticipated needs. Please provide the Committee a detailed list of the items procured and fielded.

Answer. Items procured and fielded to meet the unanticipated needs of the special operations forces (SOF) operators are provided by P-1/Program in the following Defense Emergency Response Fund (DERF) and FY02 Supplemental Listings:

SOF DERF FUNDING FOR GWOT—COMPONENT: USSOCOM

P-l Line/Program
C-130 Modifications

AC-130U All Light Level TV

ALL TV Time Multiplex

MC-130 Air Refueling

Moving Map Capability Communications Equipment & Electronics

Special Mission Radio Systems

Multi-Band Multi-Mission Radio

Multi-Band Inter/Intra Team Radio

Blue Force Tracking Devices

PLGR-11 and ARC-231 Radio Systems

Video Teleconferencing Capability

Tactical Local Area Network

C4 & Intelligence Automation System

SCAMPI

Joint Base Station

AN/PRC-112 Radios SOF Intel

Tactical Local Area Network

Joint Threat Warning System

Multi-Mission Advanced Tactical Terminal

Special Operations Tactical Video System

Remote Miniature Weather System
Special Operations Joint Interagency Collaboration Center
PSYOP Equipment

Leaflet Delivery

PSYOP Distribution System Special Reconnaissance Capability

Remote Observation Post

Remote Camera Controller

Standoff Explosive Detection System

MASINT
Rotary Wing Upgrades/Sustainment

CH^t7D to MH -17E Mods

Radar Warning Receiver

Ballistic Protection System

Air Transportability Kits

MH-J7D HAVE CSAR

MH-53 Upgrades Miscellaneous Equipment

Civil Engineering Support Equipment

Joint Operational Stocks

Sustainment Equipment

Sustainment Ammunition

Small UAV

Thermal Identification Device Internal Transportable Vehicle

Non-Standard Commercial Vehicles

All Terrain Vehicles

Hardened Sport Utility Vehicles Small Arms & Weapons

Dessert Patrol Vehicle Weapons

Body Armor & Improved Ballistic Protection

Human Patient Simulator

JOS Weapons

Night Vision Devices

Modular Integrated Comm Helmet

NSWC Weapons

M4A1 SOF Carbine Accessory Kits

Lightweight Ensemble Protective

Special Purpose Receiver

Man-Portable Decontamination Classified Programs

FY 2002 SUPPLEMENTAL FOR GWOT—COMPONENT: USSOCOM

P-l Line / Program

Communications Equipment & Electronics

Joint Base Station

Multi-Band Inter/Intra Team Radio

Multi-Band Multi Mission Radio

SCAMPI

SOF Tactical Assured Connectivity System

Tactical Local Area Network

Video Teleconferencing SOF Operations Enhancements SOF Intelligence Systems

Integrated Survey Program

Joint Threat warning system
Tactical Local Area Network
AC-13U Gunship

AC-130U Weight Reduction
SOF Training Systems
SOF Planning and Rehearsal System
C-130 Modifications

APQ Radar
PSYOP Equipment

PSYOP Broadcasting System Small Arms and Weapons

Advanced Lightweight Grenade Launcher

Body Armor/Load Carrying System

Improved Night/Day Observation Device

M4A1 SOF Carbine Accessory Kit

Modular Integrated Comm Helmet

SOF Laser Acquisition Marker

SOF Personal Equipment Adv Req Miscellaneous Equipment

Joint Operational Stocks Rotary Wing Upgrades

MH-47 Mini Gun Replacement

MH-53 Upgrades

MH-47/60 Modular Avionics

MH-47/60 Mission Processor Upgrades

MH-47/60 Multi-Function Display

MH-60 Altitude Hold

MH-60 Machine Gun

MH-47 Initial Spares Ordnance Replenishment

SOF Munitions Ordnance Acquisition

SOF Demolition Kit

Remote Activated Munitions System

105 MM High Fragmentation Rounds
Foreign Weapons and Ammunition

Question. The fiscal year 2003 increases above the budget were provided to pay for sunk costs and anticipated needs for ongoing Operations ENDURING FREEDOM and IRAQI FREEDOM. Please provide the Committee a detailed list of the items you expect to procure with these funds.

Answer. We do not have the detailed list at this time. We're certain that funding will be used to address shortfalls in deployment and redeployment related expenses, flying hour costs, reconstituting the equipment and spares shortages. The original Supplemental list was developed in November, and we're currently going through the process of revalidating shortfalls and prioritizing the Commanders highest priority combat needs.

Question. The fiscal year 2004 requests reflect the need for increased capability requirement and force structure requirements based on the Command's expanded mission. Even though the increase is large, the Command still has a substantial Unfunded Requirements list. Please provide the Committee with this list.

Answer.

MFP-11 UNFINANCED REQUIREMENTS

1$ in millions]
MM RDT&E PftOC Total Item

[table][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Priority Construct cost Design cost Unit Location Description

1 13.80 1.24 SOCOM MacDill AFB FL Information Technology Facility.

2 13 90 1.10 NSWC San Clemente. CA Maritime MOOT.

3 12.58 0.46 AFS0C Duke Field. FL Mobility/Aerial Delivery Facility.

4 13 00 1.17 NSWC Ft Story, VA Combat Skills Compound

5 2.80 0.25 NSWC Coronado, CA Small Arms Range.

6 8.40 0.40 USASOC Ft Campbell, KY Aquatic Survival Training Facility.

7 9.00 1.30 NSWC Little Creek, VA SEAL Team Ops Facility.

8 5.20 0.47 NSWC North Island, CA Boat Launch Facility.

78.68 6.39 MILCON Totals

MH-47 Helicopter

Question. The Special Operations Command has a requirement to increase its inventory of MH-47 helicopters and to forward deploy more of them to participate in future conflicts anticipated in the Global War on Terrorism. The Committee is

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