Not in the Flesh

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Hutchinson, 2007 - Criminal investigation - 266 pages
19 Reviews
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"Searching for truffles in a wood, a man and his dog unearth something less savoury - a human hand. The body, as Chief Inspector Wexford is informed later, has lain buried for ten years or so, wrapped in a purple cotton sheet. The post mortem can not reveal the precise cause of death. The only clue is a crack in one of the dead man's ribs. Although it covers a relatively short period of time, the police computer stores a long list of missing persons. Men, women and children disappear at an alarming rate, something like 500 every day nationwide. So Wexford knows he is going to have a job on his hands to identify the corpse. And then, only about twenty yards away from the woodland burial site, in the cellar of a disused cottage, another body is found. The detection skills of Wexford, Burden and the other investigating officers of the Kingsmarkham Police Force are tested to the utmost to discover whether the murders are connected and to track down whoever is responsible."--cover.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - featherbear - LibraryThing

Read on a long plane trip from New Haven to Honolulu; good vacation read. The dog digging up smelly truffles must be Rendell's spirit animal. Author specializing in psychological realism gets fantasy revenge on fantasy writers ("stabbed with a frenzy"). Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kmajort - LibraryThing

Really enjoyed this - Wexford reminds me of Barnaby in Caroline Graham's novels... I'll be sure to read more. Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Ruth Rendell is crime writing at its very best. The author of over 50 novels, she has won many significant crime fiction awards. Her first novel, From Doon With Death, appeared in 1964, and since then her reputation and readership have grown steadily with each new book.

She has received major awards for her work; three Edgars from the Mystery Writers of America; the Crime Writers' Gold Dagger Award for 1976's best crime novel, A Demon in My View; the Arts Council National Book Award for Genre Fiction in 1981 for The Lake of Darkness; the Crime Writer's Gold Dagger Award for 1986's best crime book for Live Flesh; in 1987 the Crime Writer's Gold Dagger Award for A Fatal Inversion and in 1991 the same award for King Solomon's Carpet, both written under the pseudonym Barbara Vine; the Sunday Times Literary Award in 1990; and in 1991 the Crime Writer's Cartier Diamond Award for outstanding contribution to the crime fiction genre.

Her books are translated into 21 languages. In 1996 she was awarded the CBE and in 1997 became a Life Peer.

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