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Owen's four-toed hedgehog is common in eastern Equatoria but comparatively few were examined for ticks. At Torit, a nymph of A. variegatum, a female H. leachii muhsami, and three male and a female R. sanguineus were found on hedgehogs during the dry season. A single female of the latter species occurred on a Sunat host and two male H. leachii mihsami were attached to a Tarangore specimen. A number of hedgehogs at Juba were free of ticks.

FAMILY MACROSCELIDAE

ELEPHANTULUS FUSCIPES (Thomas, 1894). Dark-footed Elephant Shrew

The only specimen of dark-footed elephant shrew, which is rare in Torit District, was found to have two nymphs of R. pravus on its ears (dry season). ELEPHANTULUS RUFESC ENS HOOGSTRAALI Setzer, 1956. Hoogstraal's

Rurous Mephant Shrew

These little animals, previously identified as E. rufescens dundasi (Hoogstraal 1950, Hoogstraal, Huff, and Lawless 1950), are common in islands of vegetation in Torit and Eastern Districts. Practically every specimen is infested, often heavily, by immature stages of R. pravus. Occasionally immature R. e. evertsi attack these animals and two nymphs of R. s. sanguineus were among the ticks removed from the hundreds of elephant shrews handled in this area.

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A single nymph of Ixodes alluaudi from the tail of an un identified shrew from Kipia at 8000 feet elevation in the Imatong Mountains is present in collections of the British Museum (Natural History).

CROC IDURA NYANSAE TOR ITENSIS Setzer, 1956. Torit Nyanza Shrew

Twenty-five Torit Nyanza shrews were examined. Two of them at Torit yielded four nymphs of H. ancertain yielde

leachii leachii (subspecies

CHIROPTERA (BATS)

A considerable number and variety of bats were examined on the east bank of Equatoria Province but few ticks were found on them. The report on these bats, not included in Setzer's (1956) work on Sudan mammals, will be presented separately. Caves in which bats rest in this area are rare and rock crevices usually too concealed and narrow for examination for ticks.

FAMILY PTEROP DAE

ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS (E. Geoffroy, 1818). Egyptian Fruit Bat.

A larval A. vespertilionis was found on a fruit bat at Lokwi.

FAMILY EMBALLONUR DDAE

TAPHOZOUS PERFORATUS HADINUS Thomas, 1915. Tomb Bat.

At Sunat several larvae of A. boueti, A. confusus, and A. vespertilionis were removed from tomb bats; also a nymphal A. boueti.

FAMILY RHINOLOPHIDAE

RHINOLOPHUS LOBATUS Peters, 1852, Horseshoe Bat.
RHINOLOPHUS CLIVOSUS ZAMBESIENSIS Andersen, 1904. Horseshoe Bat.

Seven larval A, boueti were found at Torit on R. lobatus and a nymphal I. simplex simplex on a Katire specimen of the latter bat.

FAMILY VESPERTILIONIDAE

*EPTESICUS PUSILLUS (Leconte, 1857). Serotine Bat.

At Torit, a larval A. confusus was taken from a serotine bat.

*Host name on collector's label; host identity not checked by specialist in bats.

*MIMETELLUS ?MOLONEYI (Thomas, 1891).

Four larval A. vespertilionis were found at Katire.

*PACHYOTUS SP. Brown Bat.

Single larvae of Argas sp. and of A. confusus infested a brown bat at Latome.

FAMILY MOLOSSIDAE

CHAEREPHON MAJOR (Trouessart, 1897). Free-tailed Bat.

A Torit specimen was infested by two larval A. confusus.

HOST UN IDENTIFIED

A nymph of Ixodes vespertilionis was taken at Torit.

PRIMATES (PRIMATES)

FAMILY LORISDAE

GALAGO S. SENEGALENSIS E. Geoffroy, 1796. Senegal Galago or

Bushbaby.

One of the eleven galagos taken in Torit and Juba Districts was infested by a male R. s. sanguineus.

FAMILY CERCOPITHECIDAE

PAPIO DOGUERA HEUGLINI Matschie, 1898. Heuglin's Baboon.

It is noteworthy that the numerous specimens examined in Torit District were free of ticks.

*Host name on collector's label; host identity not checked by specialist in bats.

CERCOPITHECUS MITIS STUHLMANNI Matschie, 1898. Stuhlman's Guenon

Monkey.

Twelve specimens examined in Lotti Forest and the Imatong Mountains were free of ticks.

CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS SUBSP. (Captive).

Numerous wild specimens of this common monkey were free of ticks but seventeen adult R. s. sanguineus were removed from two caged specimens at Torit. Captive monkeys were frequently in fested but the vials containing ticks removed from them during the present study have been lost.

ERYTHROCEBUS PATAS PYRRHONOTUS (Hemprich and Ehrenberg, 1832).

East African Red Monkey.

None of many specimens examined yielded ticks.

FAMILY COLOBIDAE

COLOBUS POLYKOMOS DODINGAE Matschie, 1913. Didinga Mountain

Colobus Monkey.

A single female Ixodes schillingsi was found in Lotti Forest on the eyelid of one of twelve colobus monkeys taken in Torit District. These monkeys inhabit forests, fairly dense stands of trees along streams and rivers, and restricted savannah areas with numerous trees.

PHOLDDOTA

(PANGOLINS)

FAMILY MANIDAE

MANIS TEMMINCKII Smuts, 1832. Temminck's Pangolin.

No ticks were found on the single pangolin taken in Torit District, where this animal is exceedingly rare.

LAGOMORPHA (HARES and RABBITS)

FAMILY LEPORIDAE

POBLAGUS MARJORITA OWENI Setzer, 1956.

Owen's Grass Rabbit (or Hare).

A number of specimens of this strange and highly localized grass rabbit from the Katire area were free of ticks but two individuals taken during the rainy season at Magwe yielded a male and female R. pravus and 31 exceptionally heavily punctate adult R. s. sanguineus.

LEPUS CAPENSIS CRAWSHAYI DeWinton, 1899. Crawshay's Hare.

Ticks from these hares at Ikoto included a nymph of R. S. simus, ten female R. arnoldi, nineteen adult R. pravus and a male H. Teachii muhs ami. A hare from Nagichot, at 6500 feet elevation in the Didinga Mountains, bore two female R. s. sanguineus. These hares are common in elevations somewhat above the average of the plains of Torit District.

LEPUS VICTORIAE MICROTIS Heuglin, 1865. Victoria Hare.

Victoria hares, frequently tick infested, are common in the savannah from Torit to Juba. The only immature tick found was a nymph of R. s. simus at Torit during the dry season. Many were attacked by moderate numbers of adults of R. s. sanguineus, fewer by R. pravus, and one by Ixodes rasus ? subspecies.

LEPUS CAPENSIS SUBSP.

Several Kapoeta specimens of this yet unidentified hare were infested by all stages of R. pravus and by two nymphs of A. variegatum and one female #. Teachii muhsami.

LEPUS SP.

Hosts from various sources were infested by adult F. s. sanguineus.

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