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RHIPICEPHALUS APPENDICULATUS

DAUBNEY (1942). Kenya. Infection with T. parva; brief mention of

research published elsewhere.

DAUBNEY (1944). Kenya. Transmission of T. parva by R. pravus

like that in R. appendiculatus under experimental conditions. Transmission of Nairobi sheep disease.

TENDEIRO (1955). Mozambique. Review of previous reports from

colony. THEILER (1956 correspondence). Additional host records in Onder

stepoort collection. Number of collections indicated in parenthesis. These data add significantly to our knowledge of hosts, especially of immature stages, of the brown ear. tick. Recall that immature stages are also very common on domestic animals but that these records are not listed in the present study.

Adult Hosts

Antelopes: Impala from Zululand (2), and from Mozambique (3). Duikerbok (3) and duiker (1) from Zululand. Springbok (1) from South Africa. Reedbuck (3), bushbuck (2), waterbuck (1), and nyala (1); all, from Zululand; also waterbuck (1) from Uganda. Kudu from Zululand (2), Northern Rhodesia (2), Mozam. bique (1), and Ngamiland (2).

Buffalo: From Zululand (2) and Uganda (1).

Carnivores: Lion from Transvaal (3) and Northern Rhodesia (1). Leopard from Transvaal (2), Mozambique (1), Northern Rhodesia (1), and Kenya (1). Cheetah from Southwest Africa (1). Striped hyena from Southern Rhodesia (1) and Tanganyika (1).

Pigs: Warthog from Zululand (3) and Uganda (1). Bushpig from Zululand (1) and Ngamiland (2).

Hares and rats: Rattus rattus from Uganda (1). Hare from South Africa (1.

Nymphal Hosts

Antelopes: Reedbuck from Zululand (1).

(1). Red duiker from Zulu land (1) Blue duiker from South Africa (1). Duiker from Zululand (2) and South Africa (3). Waterbuck from Zululand (1) and South Africa (2). Impala from Zululand (1) and South Africa (1). Harte beest from Northern Rhodesia (1). Lechwe (1) and greater kudu (1) from Northern Rhodesia.

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Carnivores: Big-eared fox from Kenya (1). Jackal from Transvaal (I) and Northern Rhodesia (1). Genet from Zululand (1). Banded mongoose from Uganda (1). Gray mongoose from Uganda (1). Uganda wildcat from Uganda (i).

Primates: Chacma baboon from Transvaal (4) and guenon monkey from Zululand (1) and South Africa (1).

Pigs: Warthog from Zululand (2). Bushpig from Transvaal (1). Giant forest pig from Belgian Congo (1).

Hares: Lepus spp. exceptionally heavily infested in Eastern Province, South Africa. Pronolagus ruddi from South Africa (1).

African porcupine: From Transvaal (2).

Cane rats: Tryronomys swinderianus variegatus from Nyasaland (1) and Southern Rhodesia Tit.

Bush squirrels: Paraxerus from Southwest Africa (2) and Southern Rhodesia (2).

Rodents: Mastomys coucha from Zululand (1). Rhabdomys pumilio from South Africa (4).

Elephant shrews: Tanganyika TI).

From Tanganyika (1) and Petrodromus from

Hedgehogs: From Transvaal (1).

Larval Hosts

Antelopes: Bushbuck (3) and blue duiker (1) from South Africa.

Primates: Chacma baboon from Transvaal (4). land (1).

Galago from Zulu

Carnivores: Banded mongoose from Uganda (1), Zululand (1), and South Africa (1). Genet from Zululand (1).

Rodents: Tatera gerbil from Southern Rhodesia (1). Groove toothed rat (Otomys irroratus) from South Africa (1). Mouse (Leggada minutoides) from South Africa (2).

Elephant shrews: Elephantulus myurus from Southern Rhodesia

(1).

Hares: Lepus spp. exceptionally heavily infested in Eastern Province, South Africa.

RHIPICEPHALUS COMPOSITUS

TENDEIRO (1955). Mozambique. Review of previous reports from

colony.

RHIPICEPHALUS CUSPIDATUS

GRIMALDI (1934). Ethiopia. Said to be present at Eil Nogal.

This is considered a questionable identification; see

page 631.

THEILER (ms.). Description of both sexes; review of data.

Belgian Congo material from Ozeguru (Nizi) seen in addi
tion to localities mentioned on page 631.

RHIPICEPHALUS DISTINCTUS

TENDEIRO (1955). Mozambique. Review of previous report from

colony.

RHIPICEPHALUS E. EVERTSI

GRIMALDI (1934). Yemen (Hodeida, erroneous locality or based on

cattle brought for slaughter). Eritrea, collecting locali.

ties. Not listed from Ethiopia and Somalia. TENDEIRO (1955). Mozambique. Review of previous reports from

colony.

RHIPICEPHALUS LONGUS

RHIPICEPHALUS MÜHLENSI

TENDEIRO (1955). Mozambique. Review of previous reports con

cerning both species from colony.

RHIPICEPHALUS PRAVUS

DAUBNEY (1944). Kenya. As R. neavi: see R. appendiculatus,

page 906. Not able to transmit Nairobi sheep disease ex perimentally, possibly owing to unsatisfactory feeding of ticks. Morphology and biology of tick under study.

RHIPICEPHALUS SANGUINEUS SANGUINEUS

WILLCOCKS (1922). Egypt. Presence noted.
FRANCHINI (1927X). Libya. Collected at Giarabub.
GRIMALDI (1934). Yemen, Libya, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia;

collecting localities.

TART AGLIA (1939). Yugoslavia. Case of boutonneuse fever cir.

cumstantially associated with R. s. sanguineus because of presence of this tick on dog in home of patient.

MARKOV, ABUSALIMOV, & DZASOKHOV (1939). USSR. Epizootic piro.

plasmosis of swine; transmission not achieved (similar
results with H. marginatum and R. rossicus).

KURCHATOV & POPOVA (1939). USSR. Ecology. Also noted that

hatching larvae quickly disperse, loss of ability (of
which stage not stated) to feed after lengthy starvation,
preference for dogs rather than cattle (in comparison with
R. bursa) or mice or rabbits (in comparison with R. rossicus

and R. turanicus). DAUBNEY (1944). Kenya. Stresses need for study of rickettsiae

in this species of tick.

PERVOMAISKY (1950B). USSR. Male R. sanguineus can fertilize

female R. bursa, which lay a large number of mostly fertile eggs afterwards. Mating between male R. bursa and female R. sanguineus does not result in fertile eggs.

The progeny of male sanguineus - female bursa union were only females identical to R. bursa. These hybrid females, when fertilized by male R. sanguineus, gave rise to 27 gynandromorphs and 323 females (see also Pervomaisky 1954). This paper also

reports Hyalomma gynandromorphs. CVJETANOVIC et al (1953). Yugoslavia. An exceptionally inter.

esting study of ticks including R. s. sanguineus as reser. voirs in an epidemic of Q fever. See H. dromedarii, page 878,

PERVOMAISKY (1954). USSR. Study of variation in size and

morphological characters; some reared material resembles
R. turanicus while a proportion of the progeny of R.
Euranicus resemble R. sanguineus. These two species
mate readily and produce fertile offspring.

TENDEIRO (1955). Mozambique. Review of previous reports from

colony.

SCHULZE (1955). Discussion of metabolic products.

RHIPICEPHALUS SIMPSONI

TENDEIRO (1955). Mozambique. Review of previous reports from

colony.

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