Present State of Van Diemen's Land: Comprising an Account of Its Agricultural Capabilities, with Observations on the Present State of Farming, &c. &c. Pursued in that Colony: and Other Important Matters Connected with Emigration ...

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S. Robinson, 1829 - Agriculture - 200 pages
 

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Page 199 - Superintendent or other officer administering the colonial government, at the rate of forty acres for every sum of 3 so invested, provided they give previous security ; first, that all supplies sent to the colony, whether of provisions, stores or other articles, which may be purchased by the capitalists there, or which shall have been sent out for the use of them or their parties on the requisition of the Secretary of State, if not paid for on delivery in the colony, shall be paid for at home,...
Page 15 - ... their islands ; one anchored at the island of Whanoo, and the other at the island of Paiou, a little distance from each other. Some time after they anchored, and before they had any communication with the natives, a heavy gale arose, and both vessels were driven ashore. The ship that was anchored off Whanoo grounded upon the rocks. The natives came in crowds to the sea-side, armed with clubs, spears, and bows and arrows, and shot some arrows into the ship, and the crew in return fired the guns...
Page 22 - Judging from the new buildings now erecting, the number of children, and the immense shoals of emigrants and convicts lately arrived, I should say that both houses and population bid fair to double their numbers in a few years. The houses, generally speaking, are of wood, with a small garden before them, but which is usually kept in so slovenly a manner as to be any thing but ornamental to the premises. Almost all new buildings are either of brick or stone ; the former appear of a good quality ;...
Page 200 - ... acres of land for the passage of every such labouring person over and above any other investment of capital. Any land thus granted, which shall not have been brought into cultivation, or otherwise improved or reclaimed from its wild state, to the satisfaction of Government, within twenty-one years from the date of the grant, shall, at the end of the twenty-one years, revert absolutely to the Crown.
Page 195 - ... vegetable mould upon a rich brown, open loam, of various depths, and lighter in. colour according to its depth : but on the tops of the hills there are rocks above the surface in several instances ; and from what I could observe, where trees had fallen torn up by the roots, the substratum is every where gravelly, which appears to render these hills perfectly dry. All the brooks have hard pebbly bottoms, free from mud, and the water is clear as crystal. The timber found on these hills is, in general,...
Page 200 - ... returning to the British Islands shall be conveyed to their own home at the expense of the capitalists by whom they may have been taken out. The passages of labouring persons, whether paid for by themselves or others, and whether they be male or female, provided the proportion of the sexes...
Page 190 - Widowson (p. 190) describes it as "about twelve feet long, and as thick as the little rmger of a man: the tea tree supplies them with this matchless weapon ; they harden one end, which is very sharply pointed, by burning and filing it with a flint prepared for the purpose.
Page 199 - Arrival. Such Persons, however, as may be prepared to proceed to that Country at their own Cost before the End of the Year 1829, in Parties comprehending a Proportion of not less than Five Female to Six Male Settlers, will receive Grants of Land in Fee Simple (free of Quit Rent), proportioned to the Capital which they may invest upon public or private Objects in the Colony, to the Satisfaction of His Majesty's Government at Home, certified by the Superintendent or...
Page 180 - The devil, or as naturalists term it, ' dasyurus ursinus/ is very properly named, if it is meant as a designation for the most forbidding and ugly of the animal creation. It is as great a destroyer of young lambs as the hyena, and, generally speaking, is as large as a middle sized dog. The head resembles that of an otter in shape, but is out of proportion with the rest of the body ; the mouth is furnished with three rows of double teeth ; the legs are short with the feet similar to the cat, being...
Page 199 - Although it is the intention of His Majesty's Government to form a settlement on the western coast of Australia, the Government do not intend to incur any expense in conveying settlers, or in supplying them with necessaries after their arrival. Such persons, however, as may be prepared to proceed to that country, at their own cost, before the end of the year 1829, in parties comprehending a proportion of not less than five female to six male settlers, will receive grants of land in fee simple (free...

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