Bluefield

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Arcadia Publishing, Aug 28, 2000 - Photography - 128 pages
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The remarkable story of Bluefield represents a unique combination of geology, geography, and opportunity. Once just the confluence of a handful of family farms in southern West Virginia, Bluefield was put on the map, literally,
in the 1880s, when the Norfolk & Western Railway came to town. The companys influence on the rural landscape was overwhelming, and soon, Bluefield was transformed into the center of a coal-fired universe and became a major thoroughfare for the then-thriving mining industry.
Though the companynot the coalwas king in Bluefield, enterprising men and women could, and did, share in its
success. The city evolved into a successful supply center for the enormous network of towns that sprung up almost overnight throughout the regions coalfields. For the next 60 years, Bluefield experienced dramatic growth, enticing a diverse group of newcomers who helped to build the strong cultural heritage that continues to play a prominent role in the community to the present day.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - debherter - LibraryThing

Preserves historical photos of "Nature's Air-Conditioned City" that would otherwise be lost. An excellent purchase for anyone with ties to Bluefield. Also, the Arcadia series of images and postcards ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page
Two THE AVENUE
Three THE CITY
Four TRANSPORTATION
Five CHAMBER BUSINESS
Seven ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

In Bluefield, local historian and author William R. Archer has combined informative captions with a fascinating array of visual memorabilia to illustrate the tremendous development of the city and the steadfast spirit of its people. Drawing on the collections of residents and local photographers, this engaging pictorial retrospective pays tribute to the generations that have called Bluefield home and the singular city they built.