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The king and the Locusts :
A STORY WITHOUT AN END, TO BE READ WITHOUT LAUGHING.
HERE was a certain king, "But the bricklayers had, by accident, left

who, like many other a very small hole near the top of the granary.
kings, was very fond of And there came a flight of locusts, and tried
hearing stories told. To to get at the corn; but the hole was so small
this amusement he gave that only one locust could pass through it at
up all his time; but yet he a time. So one locust went in and carried off

was never satisfied. All one grain of corn; and then another locust the exertions of all his courtiers were in vain. went in and carried off another grain of corn; The more he heard, the more he wanted to and then another locust went in and carried hear. At last, he made a proclamation, that off another grain of corn; and then another if any man would tell him a story that should locust went in and carried off another grain of last for ever he would make him his heir, corn; and then another locust went in and and give him the princess, his daughter, in carried off another grain of corn; and then marriage; but if any one should pretend that another locust went in and carried off another he had such a story, but should fail—that is, grain of corn; and then another locust went come to an end-he was to have his head in and carried off another grain of cornchopped off.

He had gone on thus from morning to For such a rich prize as a beautiful prin- night (except while he was engaged at his cess and a kingdom, many candidates ap- meals) for about a month, when the king, peared ;

and dreadfully long stories some of though a very patient king, began to be rather them told. Some lasted a week, some a tired of the locusts, and interrupted his story month, some six months: poor fellows, they with: “Well, well, we have had enough of all spun them out as long as they possibly the locusts; we will suppose that they have could, you may be sure ; but all in vain; helped themselves to all the corn they wanted; sooner or later they all came to an end; and tell us what happened afterwards." To which one after the other, the unhappy story-tellers the story-teller answered very deliberately, had their heads chopped off.

"If it please your majesty, it is impossible At last came a man who said he had a

to tell you what happened afterwards before story that would last for ever, if his Majesty would be pleased to give him a trial.

so he went on again: “And then another He was warned of his danger; they told locust went in and carried off another grain him how many others had tried, and lost their of corn; and then another locust went in and heads; but he said he was not afraid, and so carried off another grain of corn; and then he was brought before the king.

another locust went in and carried off another man of a very composed and deliberate man- grain of corn.” The king listened with adner of speaking; and, after making all the re- mirable patience six months more, when he quisite stipulations for time for his eating, again interrupted him with : "O friend ! I drinking, and sleeping, he thus began his am weary of your locusts! How soon do you story.

think they will have done?” To which the “O king ! there was once a king who was story-teller made answer: “O king! who can a great tyrant. And desiring to increase tell ? At the time to which my story has his riches, he seized upon all the corn and come, the locusts have cleared away a small grain in his kingdom, and put it into an im- space, be a cubit, each way round the mense granary, which he built on purpose, as inside of the hole; and the air is still dark high as a mountain.

with locusts on all sides : but let the king “ This he did for several years, till the have patience, and, no doubt, we shall come granary was quite full up to the top. He to the end of them in time.” then stopped up doors and windows, and Thus encouraged, the king listened on for closed it up fast on all sides.

another full year, the story-teller still going

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on as before : “And then another locust went And so the story-teller was married to the in and carried off another grain of corn ; and king's daughter, and was declared heir to the then another locust went in and carried off throne; and nobody ever expressed a wish to another grain of corn; and then another hear the rest of his story, for he said it was locust went in and carried off another grain impossible to come to the other part of it till of corn :” till at last the poor king could bear he had done with the locusts. The unreasonit no longer, and cried out: “O man, that is

able caprice of the foolish king was thus overenough! Take my daughter; take my king- matched by the ingenious device of the wise dom; take anything-take everything : only let us hear no more of those abominable locusts !"

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Prove your Principles; or, Look at Both Sides. WISH I could open your eyes to the “ You mean that ?" said the cob. true misery of our condition: injus. Of course I do. What right have those

tice, tyranny, and oppression!” said sleek pampered hunters and racers to their a discontented back to a weary-looking cob, warm stables and high feed, their grooms as they stood side by side in unhired cabs. and jockeys? It is really heart-sickening to

“I'd rather have them opened to some- think of it,” replied the hack. thing pleasant, thank you," replied the cob. “I don't know but you may be right,"

“I am sorry for you. If you could enter said the cob; "and to show I'm in earnest, as into the noble aspirations- " the hack no doubt you are, let me have half the good began.

beans you have in your bag, and you shall “Talk plain. What would you have ?" have half the musty oats and chaff I have in said the cob, interrupting him.

mine. There's nothing like proving one's “What would I have? Why, equality, principles." - Original Parables. By Mrs. and share and share alike all over the world,” Prosser. said the hack.

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The Archbishop of York on Temperance Organization. HE Archbishop of York, at a recent without Temperance, I considered it un.

necessary to have a special Society to further ance of the Church of England Tem- that which it was the very object of the perance Society, thus expressed himself:- Church to promote. I now see, however, the

As long as this terrible iniquity of drink- necessity for a special organization charged ing prevails to its present extent, we may with attending to the question of Temperance. preach from all our pulpits, we may erect our I declare in the name of Freedom, as well as in schools all over the land, and we may make the name of Education, that we of the Church elaborate social arrangements, but we shall of England must awaken all classes to this never be able to bring the people to the moral great and crying evil of intemperance. We height we desire. My hope lies in diffusing must recollect that we are ministers to the serious and sober thought about the matter. souls of men, and that at the very groundThere was a time when I thought the Church work of Christianity lie the words, Deny of England itself was a great Temperance thyself.' This maxim is not for one class, Society; because, as there could be no religion but for all."

B

Self-Conquest.
SHOWING HOW BRAVE-HEART AND STRONG-WILL FOUGHT WITH SELF;

AND HOW THE VICTORY WAS WON.
RAVE-HEART vowed he would oppose Self stole off unseen one day;
Self with all his power;

Much improved returning,
He would live unselfishly,

Well-disguised, a noble Self,
From that very hour.

Courtly, full of learning. Brave-Heart fought a noble fight,

Brave-Heart, Strong.Will, were deceived: Toiled for others' pleasure;

Offered friendship to him : Giving both from heart and hand

Till by look and tone of prid3, Generous, double measure.

Suddenly they knew him. “Surely Self is slain at last;

Humbled, full of shame and grief, I said I would subdue him."

Down they bent them lowly : Self lay still; then changed his voice,

“ From this false, this evil Self, And slyly whispered to him,

Who shall rid us wholly? Of thy victory over Self,

“We are neither brave nor strong; Tell me now the story.

Master, see our weakness : Then while Brave-Heart told the tale

We have slumbered at our posts; Self stole all the glory.

Failed in love and meekness." Strong-Will said, “ Bring Self to me,

Then the Master bade them rise; I will bind Him faster ;

Cheering words repeated : Surely of my very self

While they gazed upon His face I can be the master."

Self withdrew defeated. Firm he set his foot on Self;

He who pleasèd not Himself Forced him to obey him;

Made them pure and holy; Schooled him, tamed him, gave him rules : Where He comes is victory : Yet he failed to slay him.

He " dwelleth with the lowly.”

K. mmmar

The Young Folks' Page.

XIV. THE OLD MAN AND HIS FIVE SONS. HERE once lived a good old man who The four younger ones appeared in good G had five sons.

time for dinner, but Dick did not appear. 1. Dick, called Careless Dick.

His father asked where he was, and just then 2. Charlie.

a noise was heard, and the door opened, and 3. Willie.

Dick rushed in, all covered with mire. His 4. John, commonly called Jack. father asked him what he had done with his 5. Robert, called Sleepy Bob.

shilling P Dick said, "Shilling ! shilling!” One morning he called them all, and after and began fumbling about in his pockets, and saying that he was not rich, he drew from said, “Oh, I have lost it; for just as I was his pocket five shillings. He gave each of coming home, I fell into the duck pond, and his sons one shilling, and told them they I have lost it." His father told him to go might spend the money on anything they and change his clothes. He then asked wished, and that he would ask them what Charlie what he had done with his shilling? they had done with it at dinner time. So Charlie rubbed his eyes, and said, “Well, they all went away.

just as I was going out of the house, I met poor Archie, the washerwoman's boy, and he shining very brightly, and I asked it what I looked pale and thin, and he told me that his should do with it, and I fell asleep, and there mother was very ill; and so, to tell you the is the shilling." truth, I just gave him my shilling." His Now I am not going to tell you what father then patted him on the head, and told became of Careless Dick, Confectioner Jack, him to sit down. He then asked Willie or Sleepy Bob; but I shall tell you about what he had done with his shilling? Willie Charlie and Willie. Willie went out to India; said, “That as he passed the bookseller's he and when they were on the voyage a great saw a book called 'Every Man his own Car- storm arose, and he seemed to be everywhere, penter,' and as he liked working with tools, and if it had not been for his handiness the he went in and asked the price of it; the ship might have been wrecked. bookseller said it was 18. 6d., but, seeing the Charlie went out to Australia, and worked look of disappointment in his face, he gave it in the bush. One day he became very ill, and him for a shilling; and here," said he, "is could not work. As he was lying under a the book.” His father patted him on the tree, a horseman passed him and had com. head, and made him sit down. He then passion on him, and asked him his name, and asked Jack what he had done with his where he came from? He told him; and shilling P Jack began by coughing, clear- the man on horseback said, “Don't you reing his throat, blowing his nose, and member me?" He said, “No.” The man making a terrible fuss. After he had then said, “Don't you remember Archie, the done this, he said, “That as he passed the washerwoman's boy?” Oh yes!” he cried. confectioner's, the things looked so tempting Archie, like the good Samaritan, put him on that he went in and bought some tarts, which his own beast, took him to his home, and paid cost him tenpence, and he spent the other his passage to England again, and Charlie twopence also in the shop.” His father then prospered afterwards. told him to sit down. He then asked Bob Boys! try and be “handy"; and remem. what he had done with his shilling?

ber“One good turn deserves”-and genesaid Bob, “I went up to my bedroom, and laid rally meets with—"another.” my shilling on the window-sill and the sun was

• Oh,"

The Bible Aline Searched.

NSWERS are not to be sent to the Editor,
but will appear in each succeeding month.

us more fully than any other the completeness of
God's forgiveness?

6. Can we trace any connection of St. Paul who was associated in a remarkable manner with the crucifixion of our Lord ?

SCRIPTURE QUESTIONS.
BY THE REV. ROWLEY HILL, M.A., VICAR OF SHEFFIELD.

1. What three things do God's believing people wait for in connection with Christian hope?

2. Was a lobster & clean or unclean animal according to the law of Moses ?

3. What marked steps did the devil take with Judas for the betrayal of Jesus ?

4. Who is the earliest prophet in Scripture; and how did he prophesy?

5. What verse of the Old Testament conveys to

ANSWERS (See July No.).
1. Acts xx. 17, 35.
2. Exod. xx. 24.

3. Hab. ii. 4; See Rom. i. 17; Gal. ii. 11; Heb. x. 38.

4. Deut. xxvii. 26.
5. Isa. Ixv. 20.
6. Matt. xxii. 32.

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Self-Conquest.
SHOWING HOW BRAVE-HEART AND STRONG-WILL FOUGHT WITH SELF;

AND HOW THE VICTORY WAS WON.
RAVE-HEART vowed he would oppose Self stole off unseen one day;
Self with all his power ;

Much improved returning,
He would live unselfishly,

Well-disguised, a noble Self,
From that very hour.

Courtly, full of learning. Brave-Heart fought a noble fight,

Brave-Heart, Strong.Will, were deceived: Toiled for others' pleasure;

Offered friendship to him : Giving both from heart and hand

Till by look and tone of prids, Generous, double measure.

Suddenly they knew him. Surely Self is slain at last;

Humbled, full of shame and grief, I said I would subdue him."

Down they bent them lowly : Self lay still; then changed his voice,

"From this false, this evil Self, And slyly whispered to him,

Who shall rid us wholly ? “Of thy victory over Self,

“We are neither brave nor strong; Tell me now the story.

Master, see our weakness : Then while Brave-Heart told the tale

We have slumbered at our posts; Self stole all the glory.

Failed in love and meekness." Strong-Will said, “Bring Self to me,

Then the Master bade them rise; I will bind Him faster;

Cheering words repeated : Surely of my very self

While they gazed upon His face I can be the master."

Self withdrew defeated. Firm he set his foot on Self;

He who pleasèd not Himself Forced him to obey him;

Made them pure and holy; Schooled him, tamed him, gave him rules : Where He comes is victory : Yet he failed to slay him.

He " dwelleth with the lowly."

K.

66

The Young Folks' Page.

XIV. THE OLD MAN AND HIS FIVE SONS. HERE once lived a good old man who The four younger ones appeared in good had five sons.

time for dinner, but Dick did not appear. 1. Dick, called Careless Dick.

His father asked where he was, and just then 2. Charlie.

a noise was heard, and the door opened, and 3. Willie.

Dick rushed in, all covered with mire. His 4. John, commonly called Jack. father asked him what he had done with his

5. Robert, called Sleepy Bob. shilling! Dick said, "Shilling ! shilling!" One morning he called them all, and after and began fumbling about in his pockets, and saying that he was not rich, he drew from said, “Oh, I have lost it; for just as I was his pocket five shillings. He gave each of coming home, I fell into the duck pond, and his sons one shilling, and told them they I have lost it.” His father told him to go might spend the money on anything they and change his clothes. He then asked wished, and that he would ask them what Charlie what he had done with his shilling? they had done with it at dinner time. So Charlie rubbed his eyes, and said, “Well, they all went away.

just as I was going out of the house, I met

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