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Richards has again a little garden of his well. Their abode is very pleasant, and own, where his boys work honestly; and Phoebe's young mistress often goes to see Phoebe rents a pretty conservatory, where her, and evidently respects her for being she and Susan rear flowers which pay them tender to her family and faithful to duty.

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Rules for a Belfry. E commend to ringer must attend the service asterwards. readers the following No beer has ever entered the belfry: and wo

answer to an inquiry have no need of rules touching behaviour, for “The Rules of a Well. drink, or language, as the best of order is alconducted Belfry.” The

ways kept. writer is “Steeple- Three of the ringers are members of the

keeper" at Immanuel choir; two are Sunday-school teachers; four Church, Streatham; and it must be a double are total abstainers; and the others are very pleasure to hear the bells rung with the abstemious men. I have been a bell-ringer knowledge that the Belfry contains so noble thirty years, and for the last fifteen years a a set of ringers.

total abstainer, and I am convinced that men “Our rules are very simple, but they work can ring best without drink. We have a well, and have been in force in this belfry for Church Missionary box in the belfry, which the last ten years. We have a peal of eight receives liberal contributions. A book is bells, and ring various methods. 5,040 is kept in which the attendance is entered, common with us. We choose the most re- punctuality being particularly noticed. The spectable of the working men, and if, after payment for the Sunday ringing arises from a few weeks' trial, they can ring rounds, we the Christmas-boxes and the subscriptions, admit them into the Society on the following the total amount of which is divided accord. conditions : Entrance-fee, 28. 6d.; weeklying to attendance; and all our business is subscription, 2d.; and any member not at- transacted in the belfry, as we never adjourn tending the weekly practice is fined 3d. We to a public-house. I send these few lines ring the congregation to church every other with the sanction of our Vicar, trusting they Sunday morning and evening. On the alter- may be of some service. nate Sundays there are only chimes. Every

HENRY DANIEL.

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Fireside Fables.
BY AGNES GIBERNE, AUTHOR OF TIM TEDDINGTON'S DREAM."
I. DIVISION OF LABOUR.

“Ay, look at all those pages,” repeated the

Ink. “See them covered with my marks, EE the amount of work which I have and then say, if you like, that the writing is performed,” cried the Pen exult

your own." ingly.

"I do say so still,” persisted the Pen. “You !” said the Ink, which had been “Pretty work you would have made of it, if I running from the end of the Pen as fast as had not undertaken to run about, and leave possible for the last hour. “You must mean you in the right places on the paper.” me.”

And much good your running about, as Indeed, I mean what I say,” responded you call it, would have done, if you had not the Pen. The work is not yours. Look at had me to leave in your tracks,” said the all those pages which I have written. Much Ink. you would have accomplished without my Hitherto the disputants had kept pretty assistance!”

closely to the truth; but they began now to

me."

9

wax warm, and to lose their temper--which failed in destroying the blankness of his sheet; is always a pity between old friends, and but, instead of being covered with delicate, almost sure to lead to ill consequences. legible writing, it was one mass of black blots.

“The fact is, you quite deceive yourself,” The Ink and the Pen looked at one another, said the Pen. “No doubt you are of some and very much ashamed they both felt. service to me in my task; but there is still Both hung back at first, unwilling to make less doubt that I am a far greater help to you; advances. The Pen was the earliest to muster in fact, quite indispensable.”

up resolution, and he remarked, rather shyly: "Indeed, you greatly overvalue yourself," "Neither of us have quite succeeded in our retorted the Ink, almost growing pale with aim, I perceive." chagrin. "I should not hesitate for a moment Not exactly,” said the Ink, in an amicable to dispense with your valuable assistance, if tone, which showed him to be in a friendly I felt inclined."

state of mind. A great deal of writing you would "Perhaps, after all, the old plan is the accomplish without me," sneered the Pen. best,” said the Pen. “It certainly is neces.

As much, at all events, as you would ac- sary that I should leave some marks behind complish without me,” retorted the Ink.

“If my services are so unappreciated, I And I," said the Ink, "am unhappily shall certainly withdraw them,” said the Pen. rather disposed to run all over the paper un.

“Pray do, if you are inclined,” said the Ink. less properly guided; s) you are certainly of "Of course, in that case, you will accomplish use to me." your work without looking for assistance from “ If you acknowledge my usefulness, I am me."

quite ready to work with you again,” said the “Of course," responded the Pen haughtily. Pen, relenting.

And thereupon they separated, both re- “By all means, if you will admit that you are solved to be independent of each other. The not entirely independent of me," said the Ink. Pen travelled fast over a sheet of blank paper, “Why, no, I have proved that,” said the with the intention of performing a large Pen; and without delay they resumed their amount of work; but when he arrived at the old partnership. end he found, greatly to his annoyance, that After all, we have been rather stupid ever the sheet remained blank as ever. What to part,” said the Pen. “It is very certain could be the cause ?

that people can do much more when they He tried it again, with precisely the same work together than when they work separesult. And by that time he saw that his rately." former friend and partner, the Ink, was in a True; and I hope we shall never do such very similar predicament. Not that he had

a foolish thing again,” added the Ink.

(To be continued.)
Let us Gather up the Sunbeams."
ET us gather up the sunbeams Strange that summer skies and sunshine
Lying all around our path;

Never seem one half so fair
Let us keep the wheat and roses,

As when winter's snowy pinions
Casting out the thorns and chaff;

Shake the white down in the air. Let us find our sweetest comfort

If we knew the baby fingers In the blessings of to-day,

Pressed against the window pane With a patient hand removing

Would be cold and stiff to-morrow All the briers from the way.

Never trouble us again;
Strange we never prize the music

Would the bright eyes of our darling
Till the sweet-voiced bird has flown ! Catch the frown upon our brow ?
Strange that we should slight the violets Would the prints of rosy fingers
Till the lovely flowers are gone !

Vex us then as they do now?

Richards has again a little garden of his own, where his boys work honestly; and Phoebe rents a pretty conservatory, where she and Susan rear flowers which pay them

well. Their abode is very pleasant, and Phoebe's young mistress often goes to see her, and evidently respects her for being tender to her family and faithful to duty.

[graphic]

our

:

Steeple / Three of the ringers are members of the

a

Rules for a Belfry. E commend to ringer must attend the service afterwards. readers the following No beer has ever entered the belfry : and we

answer to an inquiry have no need of rules touching behaviour, for “The Rules of a Well- drink, or language, as the best of order is alconducted Belfry.” The

ways kept. writer is

keeper" at Immanuel choir; two are Sunday-school teachers; four Church, Streatham; and it must be a double are total abstainers; and the others are very pleasure to hear the bells rung with the abstemious men. I have been a bell-ringer knowledge that the Belfry contains so noble thirty years, and for the last fifteen years a a set of ringers.

total abstainer, and I am convinced that men “Our rules are very simple, but they work can ring best without drink. We have a well, and have been in force in this belfry for Church Missionary box in the belfry, which the last ten years. We have a peal of eight receives liberal contributions. A book is bells, and ring various methods. 5,040 is kept in which the attendance is entered, common with us. We choose the most re- punctuality being particularly noticed. The spectable of the working men, and if, after payment for the Sunday ringing arises from a few weeks' trial, they can ring rounds, we the Christmas-boxes and the subscriptions, admit them into the Society on the following the total amount of which is divided accordconditions : Entrance-fee, 28. 6d.; weekly ing to attendance; and all our business is subscription, 2d.; and any member not at- transacted in the belfry, as we never adjourn tending the weekly practice is fined 3d. We to a public-house. I send these few lines ring the congregation to church every other with the sanction of our Vicar, trusting they Sunday morning and evening. On the alter- may be of some service. nate Sundays there are only chimes. Every

HENRY DANIEL.

S

your own."

Fireside Fables.
BY AGNES GIBERNE, AUTHOR OF TIM TEDDINGTON'S DREAM."
I. DIVISION OF LABOUR.

“ Ay, look at all those pages,” repeated the

Ink. “See them covered with my marks, EE the amount of work which I have and then say, if you like, that the writing is performed,” cried the Pen exultingly.

“I do say so still,” persisted the Pen. “You !" said the Ink, which had been "Pretty work you would have made of it, if I running from the end of the Pen as fast as had not undertaken to run about, and leave possible for the last hour. "You must mean you in the right places on the paper." me.”

“And much good your running about, as “Indeed, I mean what I say,” responded you call it, would have done, if you had not the Pen. “The work is not yours. Look at had me to leave in your tracks,” said the all those pages which I have written. Much Ink. you would have accomplished without my Hitherto the disputants had kept pretty assistance !"

closely to the truth; but they began now to

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me."

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9

wax warm, and to lose their temper--which failed in destroying the blankness of his sheet; is always a pity between old friends, and but, instead of being covered with delicate, almost sure to lead to ill consequences. legible writing, it was one mass of black blots.

“The fact is, you quite deceive yourself,” The Ink and the Pen looked at one another, said the Pen. No doubt you are of some and very much ashamed they both felt. service to me in my task; but there is still Both hung back at first, unwilling to make less doubt that I am a far greater help to you; advances. The Pen was the earliest to muster in fact, quite indispensable.”

up resolution, and he remarked, rather shyly: “Indeed, you greatly overvalue yourself,” "Neither of us have quite succeeded in our retorted the Ink, almost growing pale with aim, I perceive." chagrin. “I should not hesitate for a moment "Not exactly,” said the Ink, in an amicable to dispense with your valuable assistance, if tone, which showed him to be in a friendly I felt inclined."

state of mind. A great deal of writing you would "Perhaps, after all, the old plan is the accomplish without me," sneered the Pen. best,” said the Pen. “It certainly is neces

As much, at all events, as you would ac- sary that I should leave some marks behind complish without me," retorted the Ink.

“If my services are so unappreciated, I And I,” said the Ink, “am unhappily shall certainly withdraw them,” said the Pen. rather disposed to run all over the paper un

“Pray do, if you are inclined,” said the Ink. less properly guided; s) you are certainly of “Of course, in that case, you will accomplish use to me." your work without looking for assistance from "If you acknowledge my usefulness, I am me.

quite ready to work with you again," said the “Of course,” responded the Pen haughtily. Pen, relenting.

And thereupon they separated, both re- “By all means, if you will admit that you are solved to be independent of each other. The not entirely independent of me,” said the Ink. Pen travelled fast over a sheet of blank paper, “Why, no, I have proved that,” said the with the intention of performing a large Pen; and without delay they resumed their amount of work; but when he arrived at the old partnership. end he found, greatly to his annoyance, that “After all, we have been rather stupid ever the sheet remained blank as ever. What to part," said the Pen. “It is very certain could be the cause ?

that people can do much more when they He tried it again, with precisely the same work together than when they work separesult. And by that time he saw that his rately." former friend and partner, the Ink, was in a True; and I hope we shall never do such very similar predicament. Not that he had a foolish thing again,” added the Ink.

(To be continued.) “Let us Gather up the Sunbeams.” ET us gather up the sunbeams Strange that summer skies and sunshine Lying all around our path;

Never seem one half so fair Let us keep the wheat and roses, As when winter's snowy pinions Casting out the thorns and chaff';

Shake the white down in the air. Let us find our sweetest comfort

If we knew the baby fingers In the blessings of to-day,

Pressed against the window pane With a patient hand removing

Would be cold and stiff to-morrowAll the briers from the way.

Never trouble us again;
Strange we never prize the music

Would the bright eyes of our darling
Till the sweet-voiced bird has flown! Catch the frown upon our brow ?
Strange that we should slight the violets Would the prints of rosy fingers
Till the lovely flowers are gone!

Vex us then as they do now?

Ah, those little ice-cold fingers !

How they point our memories back To the basis words and actions

Strewn along our backward track !

How those little hands remind us,

As in snowy grace they lie,
Not to scatter thorns—but roses

For our reaping by-and-by!

men

“We Stands Fire."

A WORD TO YOUNG MEN. WAS walking along the the greatest blackguard in the room cried Strand one night, and I came out, 'Lads, he is genuine-he stands fire;' upon a fine tall soldier. I and from that night every one in the room entered into conversation respected him, and began to follow his with him; and said, - example.”

“There is one thing I can. In a large establishment in Birmingham, not understand about the British soldier."

some seventy years ago, there was a youth “ What is that, sir ? '

who came from his mother's loving home "Well," I said, “he is bold and daring : in one of our beautiful villages. He had you could not insult him more than by been taught to "stand fire:” not to be calling him a coward.

There are
ashamed of God or of prayer.

The first amongst you would rush up to the cannon's night he retired to rest with several other mouth, even if you knew it would be cer. youths. He knelt down to pray, and, as in tain death. And yet there are amongst you the case of the soldier, he was instantly bemen who dare not kneel down in the bar

set by the young fellows in the room, aburack-room at night, and repeat the prayer sing him and ridicaling him. Everything their mother taught them when they were was done to induce him to abstain from children.”

prayer, but he “stood fire;" he was not He paused, and said, “That is true, ashamed of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus sir.”

Christ. Amongst the others was a strong“What is the meaning of it, soldier ? " built youth, who stood on his right, and He said:

who said, "My mother taught me to do “You remind me of what took place that. I have been ashamed of doing it, in my own roll a few weeks ago. A ”

but I will do it now." That youth became young fellow came into our room, and the the great, the noble John Angell James. first night before going to bed ho knelt

young men, if that youth had not down to pray, and instantly there was a stood fire the world might never have noise and disturbance in the room. Caps known or been blessed by the labours of John and belts were flung over at the man, but Angell James. The soldier told me what he did not move. The second night there I want you to remember. He said, “Sir, was a general cry, ' Willie, try it again.' as a rule the fresh fellows who kneel down Down he went on his knees again. Caps to

pray do not do it a second night.” Ah! and belts were thrown again, and the men young men, may that never be said of yon. whistled. The third night he went again That explains the meaning of those words, on his knees, and again on the fourth night, “He stands fire.”—From an Address by with the same result. On the fifth night, MR. T. B. SMITHIES.

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