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The Young Folks' Page.
XV. NO PITY FOR CONSTANT COMPLAINERS.
H, dear!" sighed a young field-mouse | merrily, "don't fret yourself; when you've

to a squirrel, “I am so sorry-so lived in the wood as long as I have, you'll
sad!"

know better. I used to pity her myself once “What's the matter p" asked the squirrel, (and it's not in my way to make troubles stopping short in a run.

either), but I have found out, this long time “That poor wood-pigeon-it goes to my past, that complaining is just a trick of hers, heart to hear her plaintive accents, how and that, whether she's happy or miserable, mournful, how affecting!”

she has but one note; so I never concern “Ha! ha! ha!” laughed the squirrel | myself about her.”—Mrs. Prosser.

9

XVI. LEARNING TO READ WITHOUT A BOOK. POOR boy when first brought to read and spell without a book or a master. school, was asked if he knew his But how was this? Why, another poor boy,

letters. “Oh, yes,” he said. "Can a little older than himself, bad taught him to you spello” “Oh, yes," he again answered. read, by showing him the letters over the you read?"

“ And what shop doors which they passed as they went book did you learn from P” “Oh, I never through the city. had a book in my life, sir.” “And who was His teacher, then, was a poor boy like him. your schoolmasterp” “Oh, I never was at self, and his book the signboards on the school.”

houses. What may not be done by trying, Here was a singular case: a boy could and helping one another?

Do

“Oh, yes."

XVII. REVERENCE. LITTLE boy, being put to bed one greatest Master, and seek for the best place, night, asked to be carried about a without really thinking what they are about.

little first, that he "might think a The gentleman needing a boy would not be bit before saying his prayer.” How many likely to engage that one who came looking forget to think a bit, but just fall down on as if he did not mind whether he got the their knees, say their threadbare sentences, situation or not, and certainly God will not and rise again to resume the talk that was be less wise. It is said of an old school. for a little interrupted !

master, John Trebonius, that he never enFew boys would go to ask a situation from tered his school and met his boys without a gentleman without a deal of preparation taking off his hat, by way of respect, as he so as to lo

clean and smart, and a great said he knew not what great men some of deal of thought about what words they them might yet be. How much more should should use; and yet many approach the we reverence God when we worship Him!

The Bible Aline Searched. NSWERS are not to be sent to the Editor, 5. A judge of Israel but will appear in each succeeding month. 6. A prudent man.

7. A ready scribe. SCRIPTURE QUESTIONS.

8. A sect among the Jews. The first letters of the Answers will name a

ANSWERS (See August No.). noted transgressor, who found forgiveness in a 1. Rom. viii. 23; Gal. v. 5; 1 Thess. i. 10. season of adversity.

2. Lev. xi. 10. 1. King Herod's foster-brother.

3. John xiii. 2, 27. 2. One who troubled an apostle.

4. Luke xi. 50, 51; Heb. xii. 24. 3. A city where St. Paul passed a winter.

5. Isa. xliii. 25. 4. An exemplar of faith.

6. Mark xv. 21; Rom. xvi. 13

Ah, those little ice-cold fingers !

How they point our memories back To the hasi, words and actions

Strewn along our backward track !

How those little hands remind us,

As in snowy grace they lie,
Not to scatter thorns—but roses

For our reaping by-and-by!

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men

"He Stands Fire."

A WORD TO YOUNG MEN.
WAS walking along the the greatest blackguard in the room cried
Strand one night, and I came out, 'Lads, he is genuine-he stands fire;'
upon a fine tall soldier. I

and from that night every one in the room entered into conversation respected him, and began to follow his with him; and said,

example.” " There is one thing I can. In a large establishment in Birmingham, not understand about the British soldier."

some seventy years ago, there was a youth “What is that, sir?"

who came from his mother's loving home “Well," I said, “he is bold and daring : in one of our beautiful villages. He had you could not insult him more than by been taught to "stand fire:" not to be calling him a coward.

There are ashamed of God or of prayer. The first amongst you would rush up to the cannon's night he retired to rest with several other mouth, even if

you

knew it would be cer- youths. He knelt down to pray, and, as in tain death. And yet there are amongst you the case of the soldier, he was instantly bemen who dare not kneel down in the bar

set by the young fellows in the room, aburack-room at night, and repeat the prayer sing him and ridiculing him. Everything their mother taught them when they were was done to induce him to abstain from children.”

prayer, but he “stood fire;” he was not He paused, and said, “That is true, ashamed of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus sir."

Christ. Amongst the others was a strong“What is the meaning of it, soldier ? " built youth, who stood on his right, and He said :

who said, "My mother taught me to do “You remind me of what took place that. I have been ashamed of doing it, in my own roll a few weeks ago. A but I will do it now.” That youth became young fellow came into our room, and the the great, the noble John Angell James. first night before going to bed ho knelt O young men, if that youth had not down to pray, and instantly there was a stood fire the world might never have noise and disturbance in the room. Caps known or been blessed by the labours of John and belts were flung over at the man, but Angell James. The soldier told me what he did not move. The second night there I want you to remember. He said, “Sir, was a general cry, Willie, try it again.' as a rule the fresh fellows who kneel down Down he went on his knees again. Caps to pray do not do it a second night.” Ah! and belts were thrown again, and the men young men, may that never be said of you. whistled. The third night he went again | That explains the meaning of those words, on his knees, and again on the fourth night, “He stands fire.From an Address by with the same result. On the fifth night,

On the fifth night, Mr. T. B. SMITHIES.

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The Young Folks' Page.
XV. NO PITY FOR CONSTANT COMPLAINERS.
H, dear!" sighed a young field-mouse merrily, “don't fret yourself; when you've

to a squirrel, “I am so sorry-so lived in the wood as long as I have, you'll
sad!"

know better. I used to pity her myself once “What's the matter p" asked the squirrel, (and it's not in my way to make troubles stopping short in a run.

either), but I have found out, this long time “That poor wood-pigeon-it goes to my past, that complaining is just a trick of hers, heart to hear her plaintive accents, how and that, whether she's happy or miserable, mournful, how affecting !"

she has but one note; so I never concern “Ha! ha! ha!” laughed the squirrel | myself about her.”—Mrs. Prosser.

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XVI. LEARNING TO READ WITHOUT A BOOK. POOR boy when first brought to read and spell without a book or a master. school, was asked if he knew his But how was this? Why, another poor boy, letters. “Oh, yes,” he said.

“Can

a little older than himself, had taught him to yon spello” “Oh, yes," he again answered. read, by showing him the letters over the "Do you read ?” “Oh, yes.” “And what shop doors which they passed as they went book did you learn from p” “Oh, I never through the city. had a book in my life, sir."

“ And who was

His teacher, then, was a poor boy like himyour schoolmasterp“Oh, I never was at self, and his book the signboards on the school.”

houses. What may not be done by trying, Here was a singular case: a boy could and helping one another?

XVII. REVERENCE. LITTLE boy, being put to bed one greatest Master, and seek for the best place, night, asked to be carried about a without really thinking what they are about.

little first, that he "might think a The gentleman needing a boy would not be bit before saying his prayer.” How many likely to engage that one who came looking forget to think a bit, but just fall down on as if he did not mind whether he got the their knees, say their threadbare sentences, situation or not, and certainly God will not and rise again to resume the talk that was be less wise. It is said of an old schoolfor a little interrupted !

master, John Trebonius, that he never enFew boys would go to ask a situation from tered his school and met his boys without a gentleman without a deal of preparation taking off his hat, by way of respect, as he so as to look clean and smart, and a great said knew not wh great men some of deal of thought about what words they them might yet be. How much more should

and yet many approach the we reverence God when we worship Him!

should use;

The Bible Mine Searched. NSWERS are not to be sent to the Editor, 5. A judge of Israel but will appear in each succeeding month. 6. A prudent man.

7. A ready scribe. SCRIPTURE QUESTIONS.

8. A sect among the Jews. The first letters of the Answers will name a

ANSWERS (See August No.). noted transgressor, who found forgiveness in a 1. Rom. viii. 23; Gal. v. 5; 1 Thess. i. 10. season of adversity.

2. Lev. xi. 10. 1. King Herod's foster-brother.

3. John xiii, 2, 27. 2. One who troubled an apostle.

4. Luke xi. 50, 51; Heb. xii. 24. 3. A city where St. Paul passed a winter.

5. Isa. xliii. 25. 4. An exemplar of faith.

6. Mark xv, 21; Rom. xvi. 13

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men

“He Stands Fire."

A WORD TO YOUNG MEN.
WAS walking along the the greatest blackguard in the room cried
Strand one night, and I came out, 'Lads, he is genuine-he stands fire;'
upon a fine tall soldier. I

and from that night every one in the room entered into conversation respected him, and began to follow his with him; and said, - example."

" There is one thing I can. In a large establishment in Birmingham, not understand about the British soldier."

some seventy years ago, there was a youth " What is that, sir?

who came from his mother's loving home “Well," I said, "he is bold and daring : in one of our beautiful villages. He had you could not insult him more than by been taught to "stand fire:" not to be calling him a coward.

There are
ashamed of God or of prayer.

The first amongst you would rush up to the cannon's night he retired to rest with several other mouth, even if you knew it would be cer- youths. He knelt down to pray, and, as in tain death. And yet there are amongst you the case of the soldier, he was instantly bemen who dare not kneel down in the bar

set by the young fellows in the room, aburack-room at night, and repeat the prayer sing him and ridiculing him. Everything their mother taught them when they were was done to induce him to abstain from children."

prayer, but he “stood fire;" he was not He paused, and said, “That is true, ashamed of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus sir."

Christ. Amongst the others was a strong“What is the meaning of it, soldier ? ” built youth, who stood on his right, and He said :

who said, "My mother taught me to do “You remind me of what took place that. I have been ashamed of doing it, in my own roll a few weeks ago. A but I will do it now.” That youth became young fellow came into our room, and the the great, the noble John Angell James. first night before going to bed ho knelt O young men, if that youth had not down to pray, and instantly there was a stood fire the world might never have noise and disturbance in the room. Caps known or been blessed by the labours of John and belts were flung over at the man, but Angell James. The soldier told me what he did not move. The second night there I want you to remember. He said, “Sir, was a general cry, ' Willie, try it again.' as a rule the fresh fellows who kneel down Down he went on his knees again. Caps to pray do not do it a second night.” Ah! and belts were thrown again, and the men young men, may that never be said of you. whistled. The third night he went again That explains the meaning of those words, on his knees, and again on the fourth night, “He stands fire.”From an Address by with the same result. On the fifth night, MR. T. B. SMITHIES.

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The Young Folks' Page.
XV. NO PITY FOR CONSTANT COMPLAINERS.
H, dear!" sighed a young field-mouse merrily, “don't fret yourself; when you've

to a squirrel, “I am so sorry-so lived in the wood as long as I have, you'll
sad!”

know better. I used to pity her myself once “What's the matter p" asked the squirrel, (and it's not in my way to make troubles slopping short in a run.

either), but I have found out, this long time “That poor wood-pigeon-it goes to my past, that complaining is just a trick of hers, heart to hear her plaintive accents, how and that, whether she's happy or miserable, mournful, how affecting!”

she has but one note; so I never concern "Ha! ha! ha!” laughed the squirrel | myself about her."-Mrs. Prosser.

XVI. LEARNING TO READ WITHOUT A BOOK. POOR boy when first brought to read and spell without a book or a master. school, was asked if he knew his But how was this? Why, another poor boy, letters. “Oh, yes,” he said.

“Can

a little older than himself, had taught him to you spell ?” “Oh, yes," he again answered. ?

read, by showing him the letters over the "Do you read?”

“And what shop doors which they passed as they went book did you learn from P” “Oh, I never through the city. had a book in my life, sir.” And who was His teacher, then, was a poor boy like him. your schoolmasterp” “Oh, I never was at self, and his book the signboards on the school."

houses. What may not be done by trying, Here was a singular case: a boy could and helping one another?

“Oh, yes."

XVII. REVERENCE. LITTLE boy, being put to bed one greatest Master, and seek for the best place, night, asked to be carried about a without really thinking what they are about.

little first, that he "might think a The gentleman needing a boy would not be bit before saying his prayer.” How many likely to engage that one who came looking forget to think a bit, but just fall down on as if he did not mind whether he got the their knees, say their threadbare sentences, situation or not, and certainly God will not and rise again to resume the talk that was be less wise. It is said of an old schoolfor a little interrupted !

master, John Trebonius, that he never en. Few boys would go to ask a situation from tered his school and met his boys without a gentleman without a deal of preparation taking off his hat, by way of respect, as he

as to look an and smart, and a great said he knew not what great men some of deal of thought about what words they them might yet be. How much more should should use; and yet many approach the we reverence God when we worship Him!

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The Bible Mine Searched. NSWERS are not to be sent to the Editor, 5. A judge of Israel but will appear in each succeeding month. 6. A prudent man.

7. A ready scribe. SCRIPTURE QUESTIONS.

8. A sect among the Jews. The first letters of the Answers will name a

ANSWERS (See August No.). noted transgressor, who found forgiveness in a 1. Rom. viii. 23; Gal. v. 5; 1 Thess. i. 10. season of adversity.

2. Lev. xi. 10. 1. King Herod's foster-brother.

3. John xiii, 2, 27. 2. One who troubled an apostle.

4. Luke xi. 50, 51; Heb. xii. 24. 3. A city where St. Paul passed a winter.

5. Isa. xliii, 25. 4. An exemplar of faith.

6. Mark xv, 21; Rom. xvi. 13

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