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ling almost constantly from place to place hath promised P Surely here the wilderness (for it must be remembered his diocese is very is becoming a watered garden which the Lord large, extending far beyond the single colony bath blessed!” of Sierra Leone); but confining ourselves to The Bishop's charge, from beginning to Sierra Leone alone, we learn that there are end, is most interesting; and as a testimony ninety-six Sunday services, twenty-two borne on the spot, in the presence of eyeweek-day services, and one hundred other witnesses and actual workers in the Mission, class meetings, Bible classes, etc., held even those who are ready to think lightly weekly. The Sunday morning services are of a missionary speech at home cannot call attended by about 6500 persons, the second it in question. One has heard of so-called services by about 5250 persons, and the “men of science "ridiculing the possibility of week-day services by about 1000. As be- African elevation to European equality, as if fore said, about 14,000 persons profess to God had not “made of one blood all nations have attached themselves to the missions of of men for to dwell on all the face of the the Church of England, and of these 4215 are earth.” Such men of science (science often communicating members. Then there are falsely so called—the science of unbelief) forty-four day schools and ninety-two Sunday should read Bishop Cheetham's practical schools. Two thousand six hundred is the Charge to the African clergy. I remember average attendance at the day schools, and the visit two or three years since of one of about two thousand in the Sunday schools. these clergy to the city of Worcester. I Ten of the parishes have native pastors only; heard him address a congregation from my whilst there is not a church in the colony pulpit with remarkable freedom and power. where a native clergyman does not share in He afterwards spoke in the Guildhall, and the work; neither is there a school in which astonished some of the audience by telling the teacher is other than one born in the them of the African lads in the college at land.

Sierra Leone who could translate Latin and Strangely must that mind be prejudiced Greek as well as many boys in our Eng. which fails to in these remarkable lish schools. I had much conversation with statistics the conclusive evidence of the him, and I was charmed with the richness of blessing of God on the labours of His servants; his intellect, as well as the graces of his and well may the Bishop thus comment on heart, and the retiring humility of his dispothe results secured in this portion of the sition. mission field :

Of course the work in Sierra Leone, as in Eng. “The country in which this has been land and everywhere else, has its darker shades. achieved is on the west coast of Africa; the What has been done is not all that needs to people among whom Christianity has been be done. The Bishop in his charge refers thus planted are a people redeemed from to the mistake of over-estimating our sucslavery; and the work is only half a century cess, sometimes made when the bright side old! Has not God been faithful to His only is exhibited at our missionary meetings. promises ? May not those who have sown in He points to many sad features of Sierra tears reap in joy? Has not philanthropy, Leone society. The habits of a people are notwithstanding all its toils, reaped a great not soon changed, and the habits which are reward? Have not the men of faith who engendered—spring out of the degradation of planted here the standard of the Cross reaped slavery—are not lost in a generation or two. even beyond a reasonable expectation ? Moreover, the population is comparatively What would Granville Sharp and Robert poor, especially the truly Christian portion Clarkson, what would William Wilberforce of it. Worldly colonists may be prospering, and Sir Fowell Buxton, say--names ever to

but the Christian Church is sadly hampered be cherished in our midst-could they behold for means. Hence, the Bishop says: “The the things our eyes behold ? How would hearts of toiling husbandmen in the Scott and Venn, how would Pratt and Bicker- spiritual harvest are oppressed, and their steth, acknowledge that He is faithful who hands tied and bound, for want of money."

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This lack of means is the more to be re- doms of the world shall become the kinggretted, because, from a special point of view, doms of our God and of His Christ." Sierra Leone, if the silver and the gold were As a lesson then for every reader, let it be at the disposal of Christian workers there, our aim to sympathize more and more with might become a centre of direct mission Christ's purpose toward those who are still work far into the interior of Africa. The sitting in heathen darkness." As we do bishop calls particular attention to “God's this, our self-denying interest in mission providential gathering together of so many work will increase. We shall be anxious to tribes in Sierra Leone." He asks,“ What do our part- to do what we can. Let no one can it be for p" And he traces God's pur- say, “My influence is small.” Though it be pose in such a mixture of tribes to“ produce a a grain of mustard seed,” consecrate it strong and mighty nation, which, in days to to the Lord, and He will perfect His strength come may at all events exercise a dominant in

your

weakness. influence over a much larger territory than God has always put honour on the weakest the mere peninsula of Sierra Leone.” Al. instrumentality. The history of the progress ready the influence of Sierra Leone is greatly of the Church of Christ, its great seasons extending throughout the fifteen hundred

of true spiritual revival, have ever turned miles—more than three times the length of upon the faithfulness, the love, the zeal, England—which measure the west coast of the derotedness of humble individual memAfrica; and in the vigorous branch missions bers of His Church. Look at Luther, the at Lagos and Abbeokuta, and on the banks prayerful, Bible-searching monk. What a

a of the Niger, and towards Central Africa. development, what a growth of “the mustard And, it will be remembered, it was Dr. seed,” was the glorious Reformation! SuperLivingstone's earnest plea that & colony stitious multitudes, despotic princes, a permight be formed upon the coast of East secuting priesthood, -all yielded to "the Africa from among the native Christians on solitary monk,” who, strong in the Lord and the West coast, as affording the best hope in the power of His might,” truly “shook the of introducing civilization and Christianity world.” Look at Wesley and his praying into those still benighted regions.

companions at Oxford, and trace as the result I think our glance at mission work in the revival of spiritual religion in our own Sierra Leone may well furnish a practical Church and land. Ponder that spectacle which comment on the wonderful words of the great the illustrious Wilberforce described twenty missionary, the Lord Jesus Christ : “The years after in the House of Commons, as the kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mus- sublimest that could be conceived "—the detard seed, which a man took and sowed in his voted Carey, the poor village cobbler, forming field: which indeed is the least of all seeds ; the resolve to give to the millions of Hindoos but when it is grown, it is the greatest among the Bible in their own language; and connect herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds with “the cobbler's dream" its marvellous of the air come and lodge in the branches fulfilment in his personal labours, and in the thereof” (St. Matt. xiii. 31, 32). When these combined offerings of himself and his comwords were spoken, how improbable must the panions Marshman and Ward in the time fulfilment of them have seemed! But He of their prosperity of a sum approaching who spake them knew His own purpose, and £80,000 to carry on the mission work in could read the present in the light of the India! Nay, to come to our own home exfuture. Christianity was then verily " the perience, let us trace any local awakening in

“ smallest of all seeds,” and yet what England spiritual life and activity back to its source, now is she owes to Christianity! The Bible, and we shall discover that it sprang from as our Queen declared to the African prince some "upper” or“ lower” room, in which two who asked her to tell him the secret of our or three unnoticed and unknown disciples were greatness—“The BIBLE is the secret of Eng. wont to meet together for simple prayer to land's greatness.” And in due time we God to use them in bringing about His own shall see greater things still—" The king. gracious purposes of blessing to the world.

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ling almost constantly from place to place hath promised ? Surely here the wilderness (for it must be remembered his diocese is very is becoming a watered garden which the Lord large, extending far beyond the single colony hath blessed!" of Sierra Leone); but confining ourselves to The Bishop's charge, from beginning to Sierra Leone alone, we learn that there are end, is most interesting; and as a testimony ninety-six Sunday services, twenty-two borne on the spot, in the presence of eyeweek-day services, and one hundred other witnesses and actual workers in the Mission, class meetings, Bible classes, etc., held even those who are ready to think lightly weekly. The Sunday morning services are of a missionary speech at home cannot call attended by about 6500 persons, the second it in question. One has heard of so-called services by about 5250 persons, and the men of science "ridiculing the possibility of week-day services by about 1000. As be African elevation to European equality, as if fore said, about 14,000 persons profess to God had not " made of one blood all nations have attached themselves to the missions of of men for to dwell on all the face of the the Church of England, and of these 4215 are earth.” Such men of science (science often communicating members. Then there are falsely so called—the science of unbelief) forty-four day schools and ninety-two Sunday should read Bishop Cheetham's practical schools. Two thousand six hundred is the Charge to the African clergy. I remember average attendance at the day schools, and the visit two or three years since of one of about two thousand in the Sunday schools. these clergy to the city of Worcester. I Ten of the parishes have native pastors only; heard him address a congregation from my whilst there is not a church in the colony pulpit with remarkable freedom and power. where a native clergyman does not share in He afterwards spoke in the Guildhall, and the work; neither is there a school in which astonished some of the audience by telling the teacher is other than one born in the them of the African lads in the college at land.

Sierra Leone who could translate Latin and Strangely must that mind be prejudiced Greek as well as many boys in our Eng. which fails to in these remarkable lish schools. I had much conversation with statistics the conclusive evidence of the him, and I was charmed with the richness of blessing of God on the labours of His servants; his intellect, as well as the graces of his and well may the Bishop thus comment on heart, and the retiring humility of his dispothe results secured in this portion of the sition. mission field :

Of course the work in Sierra Leone, as in Eng. “The country in which this has been land and everywhere else, has its darker shades. achieved is on the west coast of Africa; the What has been done is not all that needs to people among whom Christianity has been be done. The Bishop in his charge refers thus planted are a people redeemed from to the mistake of over-estimating our sucslavery; and the work is only half a century cess, sometimes made when the bright side old! Has not God been faithful to His only is exhibited at our missionary meetings. promises ? May not those who have sown in He points to many sad features of Sierra tears reap in joy? Has not philanthropy, Leone society. The habits of a people are notwithstanding all its toils, reaped a great not soon changed, and the habits which are reward? Have not the men of faith who engendered-spring out of the degradation of planted here the standard of the Cross reaped slavery—are not lost in a generation or two. even beyond a reasonable expectation ?

Moreover, the population is comparatively What would Granville Sharp and Robert poor, especially the truly Christian portion Clarkson, what would William Wilberforce of it. Worldly colonists may be prospering, and Sir Fowell Buxton, say-names ever to but the Christian Church is sadly hampered be cherished in our midst-could they behold for means. Hence, the Bishop says: “The the things our eyes belıold ? How would hearts of toiling husbandmen in the Scott and Venn, how would Pratt and Bicker- spiritual harvest are oppressed, and their steth, acknowledge that He is faithful who hands tied and bound, for want of money."

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This lack of means is the more to be re- doms of the world shall become the kinggretted, because, from a special point of view, doms of our God and of His Christ." Sierra Leone, if the silver and the gold were As a lesson then for every reader, let it be at the disposal of Christian workers there, our aim to sympathize more and more with might become a centre of direct mission Christ's purpose toward those who are still work far into the interior of Africa. The

"sitting in heathen darkness.As we do bishop calls particular attention to “God's this, our self-denying interest in mission providential gathering together of so many work will increase. We shall be anxious to tribes in Sierra Leone.” He asks, “ What do our part-to do what we can.

Let no one can it be for D" And he traces God's pur- say, “ My influence is small.” Though it be pose in such a mixture of tribes to“ produce a a grain of mustard seed,” consecrate it strong and mighty nation, which, in days to to the Lord, and He will perfect His strength come may at all events exercise a dominant in your weakness. influence over a much larger territory than God has always put honour on the weakest the mere peninsula of Sierra Leone.” Al instrumentality. The history of the progress ready the influence of Sierra Leone is greatly of the Church of Christ, its great seasons extending throughout the fifteen hundred of true spiritual revival, have ever turned miles--more than three times the length of upon the faithfulness, the love, the zeal, England-which measure the west coast of the derotedness of humble individual memAfrica; and in the vigorous branch missions bers of His Church. Look at Luther, the at Lagos and Abbeokuta, and on the banks pray erful, Bible-searching monk. What a of the Niger, and towards Central Africa. development, what a growth of the mustard And, it will be remembered, it was Dr. seed," was the glorious Reformation! SuperLivingstone's earnest plea that a colony stitious multitudes, despotic princes, a permight be formed upon the coast of East secuting priesthood, -all yielded to "the Africa from among the native Christians on solitary monk,” who, strong in the Lord and the West coast, as affording the best hope in the power of His might,” truly “shook the of introducing civilization and Christianity world.” Look at Wesley and his praying into those still benighted regions.

companions at Oxford, and trace as the result I think our glance at mission work in the revival of spiritual religion in our own Sierra Leone may well furnish a practical Church and land. Ponder that spectacle which comment on the wonderful words of the great the illustrious Wilberforce described twenty missionary, the Lord Jesus Christ : “The years after in the House of Commons, as the kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mus- “ sublimest that could be conceived ”- the detard seed, which a man took and sowed in his voted Carey, the poor village cobbler, forming field: which indeed is the least of all seeds; the resolve to give to the millions of Hindoos but when it is grown, it is the greatest among the Bible in their own language; and connect herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds with “ the cobbler's dream" its marvellous of the air come and lodge in the branches fulfilment in his personal labours, and in the thereof” (St. Matt. xiii. 31, 32). When these combined offerings of himself and his comwords were spoken, how improbable must the panions Marshman and Ward in the time fulfilment of them have seemed! But He of their prosperity of a sum approaching who spake them knew His own purpose, and £80,000 to carry on the mission work in could read the present in the light of the India! Nay, to come to our own home exfuture. Christianity was then verily " the perience, let us trace any local awakening in smallest of all seeds,” and yet what England spiritual life and activity back to its source, now is she owes to Christianity! The Bible, and we shall discover that it sprang from as our Queen declared to the African prince some “upper” or“ lower” room, in which two who asked her to tell him the secret of our or three unnoticed and unknown disciples were greatness—"The BIBLE is the secret of Eng. wont to meet together for simple prayer to land's greatness.” And in due time we God to use them in bringing about His own shall see greater things still—"The king. gracious purposes of blessing to the world.

:

From “the mustard seed” as the emblem of the “kingdom of God," let us learn that great usefulness is not dependent on great opportunities, great wealth, or great wisdom.

It turns rather upon “the single eye,” and the whole-hearted offering of ourselves to God, prompting the question of our lives : “Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do?"

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Fireside Fables.
BY AGNES GIBERNE, AUTHOR OF TIM TEDDINGTON'S DREAM."

(Continued from page 213.) II, EXAMPLE BETTER THAN PRE

Do. What was it, my dear ?" asked the СЕРТ.

Grey Cat unguardedly.

“Well, I didn't see, mother, why, if you POW, remember!" said the Grey Cat took butter out of the larder, I mightn't take

to her Kitten. “You understand milk out of the pantry,” said the Kitten, tak

what I have been telling you. Never ing care to keep at a respectful distance. take anything that does not belong to you.

Ah! I see," said the Tortoise-shell. 6. I If you do, you will suffer for it. You have

understand now. Take care, Mrs. Grey Cat, escaped undetected this time, but you are not

that, with all your talking and teaching, you likely to do so again. Think of my words,

don't, by the mere force of example, turn out and always be honest."

your

child an arrant thief, probably ten times “I'll be sure," said the Kitten, who was worse than you are yourself." longing for a romp with a ball that lay And the Grey Cat slunk away without a

word to say for herself. “ It is such a shocking thing to steal," pursued the Grey Cat. “It becomes such a habit. If you don't conquer it now, you will

III. WHO TO BLAME. never overcome it when you are older. You HE feathered songsters of the forest will grow up a confirmed thief; be disliked were in a gr state of excitement. by every one; and break my heart."

And no wonder. For the daily con“I won't,” said the Kitten, looking much cert which took place amongst the trees impressed.

all through the summer months, delighting “You see, habits of that kind always grow every ear with its sweetness and melody, upon one,” said the Grey Cat again. "Don't had for once proved a failure, and much peryou agree with me?” appealing to the old plexity was excited as to the cause. Tortoise-shell.

So a meeting was at once convened of the “Very much so," replied the Tortoise-shell. principal songsters to discuss the question, “ You don't mean to say

that your little one and to discover on whom the blame rested. is addicted to stealing ?”

But this was not an easy thing to find out, “Not often,” said the Kitten deprecatingly. for every one endeavoured to shift the blame Only just a little milk once or twice.” from his own shoulders to those of his

A little is as bad as a great deal, if it neighbour. doesn't belong to you,” said the Tortoise-shell, “I can inform you to whom part of our who was the model of an honest, well-behaved failure was owing,” romarked the Blackbird, cat.

who was a personage of importance, more on “Just what I have been saying," observed account of his size than of his musical powers: the Grey Cat. “It is very sad-a melan- “The Sparrows were twittering most dis. choly fact to contemplate. I can't imagine gracefully out of tune." how a kitten of mine can have so forgotten “It seemed to me that somebody whistleu herself, or what can have put it into her most disgracefully out of tune," muttered a head."

pert Sparrow, who had hopped unasked inio "I could tell you that easily enough," said the assembly. the Kitten, who was rather apt to be pert. The Raven made some very hoarse dis

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