Page images
PDF
EPUB

mances.

a weekly knock at their doors ; and if they papers illustrating "Leading Points of will but let us in, we will do our best Gospel Truth." to show that we appreciate their kindly The Illustrations will be first-class, and welcome.

include a series of Portraits of Men of the "HAND AND HEART," our Title, is very Time. comprehensive; and we shall prefer to Our first number will be ready soon indicate our intentions by our perfor- after this meets the eye of the reader; so

We certainly could not, in start- that orders may at once be given at any ing, well offer more than “HAND AND bookseller's. We hope to report next month HEART” to any one; but we do that most that a Foodly number of Home resolves heartily; and in return we hope to en- have been formed to give a hearty receplist the Hands and Hearts of all our

tion every week to “ HAND AND HEART.” readers. We will only say that we pro- We shall be glad to send one hundred pose to discuss in our columns the lead

copies of the first number at half-price, ing practical questions of the day; and viz.: 4s. 2d., to any “hearty friend” who our plan embraces such topics as the fol- will lend us "a helping hand " by introlowing :

ducing us to their neighbours. In most “ The Week; its Events and Opinions :" cases it would not be difficult to find “England at Work :” “In Parliament:" purchasers for the hundred copies : so

“ “Sanitary Questions :"

“Building

that there need be no loss. * House :" "Our Children's Education :" If only one out of every two hundred of “ Fireside Tales:" “ The Workman's Rest our present readers will render us this Day:” “The Temperance Movement:" kind service, one hundred thousand copies “The Humanity Page:" "Men of the

will be required; and this will go far to Time; or, Life Lessons from Leading ensure the immediate success of “HAND Biographies :" "Historic Pictures :” “Out AND HEART.” Will the reader be the one ? and About; or,

Round the World :" We will only add, may " the good Hand “Household Economy:" "Evenings at of our God” be upon us in this and Home :” etc.

every other work; and give us, and our “The Evidences of Christianity" will readers too, for the New Year, also be presented in a popular form, with " A Hand to labour, and a Heart to love."

* Stamps or Post-office Order for this purpose should be sent to Mr. Thomas B. Burrow, Worcester.

a

a

“ Come Back as soon as you Can.” VERY morning my little Kate Oh, linger not, a tavern guest, Runs with me down to the garden With reckless mates in haunts unblest. gate,

Get back, get back, as soon as you can; And cries, while bidding me sweet good. As soon as you can, get Home. bye,

Where should a man and a father be, With her tiny voice and her laughing eye,

But with his wife and his family ? "Come back, come back as soon as you

She that doth love you is waiting there, can ;

They who so helplessly need thy care. As soon as you can, come Home.”

Get home then, brother, as soon as you Working man, working man,

can; Hasten home as soon as you can ;

As soon as you can, get Home.

S. W. P.

while the rest stood, and sobbed out my soul his voice and dear mother's, who loved and in the words, “Father, I have sinned.” trusted the same dear Saviour as I do, say,

From that day I cast in my lot with Mrs. Welcome home, indeed!” Herbert. I served her as you know till she • And I say, too, that of all griefs and sordied, and a good friend she was to me. She rows I have known, those I have brought upon said she had only waited at Seabourne till I myself have been the sorest. I have seen my came, and now she would go to another part little ones die, poor lambs! and we lost a girl of England altogether. So by midsummer we younger than our Susan, just as she was were off, and came to Devonshire, where I growing one of the prettiest maidens eyes have made my home ever since.

ever looked upon. Times, too, were bad I married my wife Susan from Mrs. Her- when I had the rheumatic fever, and was laid bert's house, and a good wife she's been to up for months, and Susan and the children me. We have had our trials and our crosses, were poorly clothed and fed, just two weeks but, blessed be God! we have held on to each after we lost my dear mistress. But in all other; and though we are both of us over the these troubles there was no pain like that I years of man we don't love each other the less. felt when struck dumb with remorse and the

It was Susan who told me to get the kind helplessness of grief, I stood by the old porch, hand who has written down my story to take and knew I could never hear my father say, the trouble; for, as she says, “ It may be well “Roger, I forgive you." to let those that come after me see how the I took my own way, and dust and ashes it Lord has brought me by a way I knew not, proved to me. Since I have humbly tried to and given me peace.” And, as Susan says,- take God's way, burdens have grown lighter, “It may be that some wilful, discontented boys and His smile is like sunshine behind the who read the story may take a lesson." I clouds. don't know about that. Lessons are not so He is a good and kind Master, and happy easily learned; but this I can tell any such, are the folk who serve Him in the days of that I would have given my right hand many their youth, and find Him in old age a staff a time only to have heard my father say, and a stay, when strength faileth. Yes, happy "Well, Roger, boy, welcome home !"

are they who find Him their portion for ever. I can scarcely bear it now, though maybe I Blessed are those who have the Lord for their am very near the home above, and I may hear God!

“ Hand and Heart."

THE NEW ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY JOURNAL.

[graphic]

THE EDITOR TO THE READERS OF “HOME WORDS."

NEW Friend! But not believe the welcome accorded to it has

one intended to displace been unexampled. It has now attained a
the old Friend! “Two monthly circulation exceeding 200,000

are better than one :" copies, and we hope to reach 250,000 in
and “HOME WORDS 1876.
will, we trust, thrive But monthly visits during the year are

all the better for the 6 few and far between." We want to see companionship of “HAND AND HEART.” more of our readers; and we think we

For four years it has been our high privi- may hope, without undue presumption, lege to find admission for Home Words " that they are not indisposed to see more in many thousands of English homes. We

At any rate, we are going to make

of us.

>

mances.

a weekly knock at their doors; and if they papers illustrating "Leading Points of will but let us in, we will do our best

Gospel Truth." to show that we appreciate their kindly The Illustrations will be first-class, and welcome.

include a series of Portraits of Men of the “ HAND AND HEART,” our Title, is very Time. comprehensive; and we shall prefer to Our first number will be ready soon indicate our intentions by our perfor- after this meets the eye of the reader; so

We certainly could not, in start- that orders may at once be given at any ing, well offer more than

“ HAND AND

bookseller's. We hope to report next month HEART” to any one; but we do that most that a woodly number of Home resolves heartily; and in return we hope to en- have been formed to give a hearty receplist the Hands and Hearts of all our

tion every week to “ HAND AND HEART.” readers. We will only say that we pro- We shall be glad to send one hundreil pose to discuss in our columns the lead copies of the first number at half-price, ing practical questions of the day; and viz.: 4s. 2d., to any “hearty friend” who our plan embraces such topics as the fol- will lend us "a helping hand " by introlowing:

ducing us to their neighbours. In most “The Week; its Events and Opinions :" cases it would not be difficult to find “England at Work :" "In Parliament"

purchasers for the hundred copies : so "Sanitary Questions :" “Building a that there need be no loss. * House :" Our Children's Education :" If only one out of every two hundred of “ Fireside Tales :" "The Workman's Rest

our present readers will render us this Day:” “The Temperance Movement:" kind service, one hundred thousand copies “The Humanity Page:” “Men of the

:

will be required; and this will go far to Time; or, Life Lessons from Leading ensure the immediate success of “HAND Biographies :" "Historic Pictures :" "Out AND HEART." Will the reader be the one ? and About; or, Round the World :" We will only add, may “the good Hand “Household Economy:" "Evenings at of our God” be upon us in this and Home :" etc.

every other work; and give us, and our “ The Evidences of Christianity" will readers too, for the New Year,also be presented in a popular form, with " A Hand to labour, and a Heart to love."

* Stamps or Post-office Order for this purpose should be sent to Mr. Thomas B. Burrow, Worcester.

[ocr errors]

a

:

“ Come Back as soon as you Can.” VERY morning my little Kate Oh, linger not, a tavern guest, Runs with me down to the garden With reckless mates in haunts unblest. gate,

Get back, get back, as soon as you can ; And cries, while bidding me sweet good

As soon as you can, get Home. bye,

Where should a man and a father be, With her tiny voice and her laughing eye,

But with his wife and his family ? "Come back, come back as soon as you

She that doth love you is waiting there, can;

They who so helplessly need thy care. As soon as you can, come Home.”

Get home then, brother, as soon as you Working man, working man,

can; Hasten home as soon as you can ;

As soon as you can, get Home.

S. W. P.

[graphic]

ing the

Our Indian Empire.
HE visit of the Prince of that the Gospel may be theirs. Already the

Wales to our Indian Em. work of evangelization in India has been
pire is an event which we greatly blessed. There are at least 200,000
fervently trust may con- native Christians; and what is more en-

duce to the best interests couraging as a promise of future progress, of our fellow-subjects in that there are manifest tokens that the Hindoos

immense and populous terri- generally are losing confidence in their own tory.

superstitious and false faiths; thus preparIndia is one of the brightest jewels of the

way

for the more direct influence of British crown. It contains a population of Christian truth. more than one hundred and fifty millions, We hope in our next volume to give some chiefly Hindoos and Mahommedans. Its illustrated papers on India. Our present extent of country covers as much space on illustration gives a view of one of the chief the globe as the whole of Europe, Russia cities-Madras—from the beach. The site excepted. In extreme length it measures of this city was the first ground secured by between eighteen hundred and nineteen the British in India. They obtained perhundred miles; in its extreme width about mission in 1639 to erect a fort here. No fifteen hundred miles. From it we acquire worse position could have been chosen, as it large stores of wealth, and in it many thou. is situate on a flat, sandy shore, wbere the sands of our countrymen find the means of surf runs with extreme violence; and is surattaining occupation and wealth.

rounded by salt water creeks or rivers, which It seems almost beyond even the marvellous, prevent the introduction of a stream of fresh that this vast region, situate by the ordinary water into the town. The climate is very route at a distance exceeding half the hot. The population is estimated at between globe's circumference, has to its uttermost 700,000 and 800,000. It has some good borders been subjected to the uncontrolled streets and bazaars, but the houses are very dominion of British sway. We may well and irregular. There is a Bishop of Madras, and wisely trace this gift of power to Divine it is the seat of all the chief government Providence; and we can scarcely doubt that, offices for the presidency, of which it is the in the purpose of God, India is ours in order capital.

THE EDITOR.

one.

Richard Barter.
BY THE REV. J. C. RYLE, M.A., HON. CANON OF NORWICH, AND VICAR OF

STRADBROKE, SUFFOLK.

(Continued from page 255.) ŞOR another thing, Baxter the last twenty-nine years of his life. He

was one of the most patient had robbed no one. He had murdered no martyrs for conscience' sake He had injured no one.

He held no that England has ever seen. heresy. He believed all the articles of the

Of course I do not mean Christian faith. And yet no thief nor felon in that he was called

upon
to

the present day was ever so shamefully treated seal his faith with his blood, as this good man. To tell you how often he as our Protestant Reformers were. But there was summoned, fined, silenced, imprisoned, is a “dying daily,” which, to some natures, is driven from one place to another, would be worse even than dying at the stake. If any. an endless task. To describe all the hideous thing tries faith and patience, I believe it to perversions of justice to which he was subbe the constant dropping of such wearing jected would be both painful and unprofitable. persecution as Baxter had to endure for nearly | I will only allow myself to give one instance,

[graphic]
[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »