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66

Fireside Fables.
BY AGNES GIBERNE, AUTHOR OF TIN TEDDINGTON'S DREAM," ETC.

(Continued from page 261.)
VII. TOIL FOR NAUGHT.

their wild career. Onward, onward they RESS on! Press on!” murmured pressed, breaking upon the shore with such the Sea.

force that it might almost have been expected The Waves pressed on in obedience to give way under them; but it lay calm and to her commands, somewhat slowly at first, placid, and though seeming for the time over. but increasing in speed and strength. One come, it was not vanquished. The Ridge of after another rolled up the shingly beach, Shingles was climbed at last; but the victory gathering size and power at every stride, till was not yet attained, for other ridges lay be. with a crash it broke, sending showers of yond, and the Waves were worn and ex. foam around. But Wave after Wave poured bausted with their efforts. back again into the waters behind, leaving "Press on! press on!” again urged the the wet glistening pebbles bare, and the Sea Sea. “Victory is not yet ours: the Shore is looked desponding; clouds cast their shadows not yet conquered." over her, and her deep blue colour was But the Waves had no longer power to changed to a dull leaden hue.

press on. They still strove, and at times one “Press on!” she repeated, "we are mak. of unusual size would rush up a little farther ing no way, and the Shore must be con- than those preceding; but it soon became guered. My Waves cannot fail to cover her evident that they were no longer advancing in time, and then I shall be content. Press -worse still, that victory was passing out of on! press on!”

their hands into those of the Shore. They The Waves strove again with redoubled began to feel that they had no power even to energy, and it soon became evident that they retain what they had gained. They were were making way, though very slowly. Each slow to perceive the truth, and still the Sea wave individually might be shattered and eagerly cried, “Press on! press on!” but driven back by the strong immovable shore: her voice grew less confident, and soon there yet, on the whole, there was progress, and was a murmur of sorrowful lament from the now and then one more powerful than the weakened Waves, rest rushed up higher than any yet had been. “We are retreating-we are driven back! The Waves grew more impetuous as they ad- Our power is gone!” vanced. Higher and higher they rose, and It was too true. Slowly, slowly they gave louder and louder were the mighty crashes way, and inch by inch the Land regained all with which they fell on the opposing shingles. that she had for the time lost of her brave The latter were washed hither and thither, Shore-tbat bulwark without which she and ground fiercely together, till they might would be powerless, indeed, against the en

, have been deemed already conquered. But croachments of the ever-ambitious Sea. there was another high steep ridge beyond, But the Waves gradually ceased to struggle, which the Sea ardently desired to climb, and and at length the Sea found herself lying at again she repeated her commands to the the point from which she had started twelve Waves.

hours earlier, placid and still as a mirror. “Press on! press on! success is nearly "It was lost toil and trouble,” she mur. ours! We must reach the summit, and then mured, sadly. “I thought my power was we shall be conquerors, and the Sea will reign boundless, and I would have conquered that supreme.”

to which I had no right. Alas! was it worth More and more furious grew the tumult, the loss of my mighty and beautiful Waves ? in answer to her words. The wind arose and They spent themselves to no purpose, but in whistled over the Waves, helping them in the vain effort to satisfy my ambition."

Ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.”—1 Cor. xv. 6.

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The Young Folks' Page.

XXII. RESTORING “FOURFOLD."
NE day, writes Mrs. Ellis, "a girl in him fourfold.' I took from you one sixpence,

one of the mission schools in Africa, I restore you back four.”

went to the missionary, and put four What a delicacy of conscience, and what a sixpences into his hand, saying, "That is simplicity of obedience were here ! There your money."

“No; was the answer, was no holding back from open confession, no 'you do not owe me anything.” “Yes, I shrinking from full reparation. She did what do," she replied, " and I will tell you how: she had learned from the Scriptures to be her At the public examination you promised six- duty; and doubtless the four silver pieces in pence to the one in my class who wrote the that dark little hand were acceptable to the best specimen on a slate. I gave in my slate, Lord. Had her object been to win praise, she and got the sixpence, but some one else wrote would have offered the money as a gift to the the specimen for me. Yesterday you read in mission, and so have sought at the same time chapel about Zaccheus, who said, 'If I have to quiet conscience and gain credit for a taken away anything from any man, I restore liberal deed.

A. L. O. E.

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“ I always

XXIII. TOWSER AND WILLIE. Y neighbour keeps a noble Newfound. , immediately; don't let me have to tell you land dog. Not long since I was again."

passing his house about mid-day, The little fellow was mending his cart, but when he came out with Towser at his heels he dropped his hammer, now that he saw and a pail in his hand. He told Towser to there was no escape, and started. take the pail and carry it to the pump, a few have the wood to bring,” he muttered, as he rods across the way. The dog did not whine left the room. He obeyed very reluctantly. over the command, nor curl his tail and refuse

He went pouting and murmuring after the to go; no, not he. He obeyed at once, took wood, and when he returned he threw it into the pail in his mouth, and away he went. the box with a violence that threatened to Faithful dog, thought I never to refuse break it to pieces. His mother looked obedience, or wait for the second bidding. ashamed and heart-sick. I pitied her from

Then I thought of little Willie S., who said the depths of my soul. Think of it. Her son to his mother in my presence, “ No, I can't was less obedient than the dog; for the dog do it; let Ned go; he is not doing any went cheerfully, wagging his bushy tail, and

lifting his head as if to say, I obey." · Willie," exclaimed his mother in a com- Should Towser be more obedient than manding tone, "go and bring that wood Willie.-Should I?"

thing."

66

The Bible Mine Searched. NSWERS are not to be sent to the Editor, 3. The head of Damascus." but will appear in each succeeding month. 4. The father of the only officer in Gilead in the

days of Solomon. SCRIPTURE QUESTIONS.

5. A queen noted in Scripture history.

6. A judge of Israel who was rich in asses. The initial letters will name one to whom a prophet confided the title-deeds (f his property :

ANSWERS (see November No.) the final letters will name a prayerful prophet. 1. Paul. Acts xxv. 23, 24. 2. Simeon. Luke

1. A monarch to whom à king of Judah paid ii. 34. 3. Matt. i. 1. 4. Babylon. Isa. xiv, 4. tribute.

5. Barnabas. Acts iv. 36; xi. 22-24. 6. At 2. The Jewish king who paid the tribute.

Troas. Acts xx. 6, 7.

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66

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Fireside Fables.
BY AGNES GIBERNE, AUTHOR OF TIM TEDDINGTON'S DREAM," ETC.

(Continued from page 261.)
VII. TOIL FOR NAUGHT.

their wild career. Onward, onward they RESS on! Press on!” murmured pressed, breaking upon the shore with such the Sea.

force that it might almost have been expected The Waves pressed on in obedience to give way under them; but it lay calm and to her commands, somewhat slowly at first, placid, and though seeming for the time overbut increasing in speed and strength. One come, it was not vanquished. The Ridge of after another rolled up the shingly beach, Shingles was climbed at last; but the victory gathering size and power at every stride, till was not yet attained, for other ridges lay bewith a crash it broke, sending showers of yond, and the Waves were worn and exfoam around. But Wave after Wave poured hausted with their efforts. back again into the waters behind, leaving "Press on! press on!” again urged the the wet glistening pebbles bare, and the Sea Sea. “Victory is not yet ours: the Shore is looked desponding; clouds cast their shadows not yet conquered." over her, and her deep blue colour was But the Waves had no longer power to changed to a dull leaden hue.

press on. They still strove, and at times one “Press on!” she repeated, “we are mak- of unusual size would rush up a little farther ing no way, and the Shore must be con- than those preceding; but it soon became quered. My Waves cannot fail to cover her evident that they were no longer advancing in time, and then I shall be content. Press -worse still, that victory was passing out of on! press on!”

their hands into those of the Shore. They The Waves strove again with redoubled began to feel that they had no power even to energy, and it soon became evident that they retain what they had gained. They were were making way, though very slowly. Each slow to perceive the truth, and still the Sea wave individually might be shattered and eagerly cried, “Press on! press on !” but driven back by the strong immovable shore: her voice grew less confident, and soon there yet, on the whole, there was progress, and was a murmur of sorrowful lament from the now and then one more powerful than the weakened Waves,rest rushed up higher than any yet had been. "We are retreating-we are driven back! The Waves grew more impetuous as they ad- Our power is gone!” vanced. Higher and higher they rose, and It was too true. Slowly, slowly they gave louder and louder were the mighty crashes way, and inch by inch the Land regained all with which they fell on the opposing shingles. that she had for the time lost of her brave The latter were washed hither and thither, Shore-that bulwark without which she and ground fiercely together, till they might would be powerless, indeed, against the enhave been deemed already conquered. But croachments of the ever-ambitious Sea. there was another high steep ridge beyond, But the Waves gradually ceased to struggle, which the Sea ardently desired to climb, and and at length the Sea found herself lying at again she repeated her commands to the the point from which she had started twelve Waves.

hours earlier, placid and still as a mirror. “ Press on

!

press on! success is nearly “It was lost toil and trouble," she mur. ours! We must reach the summit, and then mured, sadly. “I thought my power was we shall be conquerors, and the Sea will reign boundless, and I would have conquered that supreme.”

to which I had no right. Alas! was it worth More and more furious grew the tumult, the loss of my mighty and beautiful Waves! in answer to her words. The wind arose and They spent themselves to no purpose, but in whistled over the Waves, helping them in the vain effort to satisfy my ambition."

Ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord."-1 Cor. xv. 6.

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The Young Folks' Page.

XXII. RESTORING “FOURFOLD." NE day, writes Mrs. Ellis, "a girl in him fourfold.' I took from you one sixpence, one of the mission schools in Africa, I restore you back four.

went to the missionary, and put four What a delicacy of conscience, and what a sixpences into his hand, saying,—“That is simplicity of obedience were here ! There your money.” “No;” was the answer, was no holding back from open confession, no 'you do not owe me anything." Yes, I shrinking from full reparation. She did what do,” she replied, “ and I will tell you how : she had learned from the Scriptures to be her At the public examination you promised six- duty; and doubtless the four silver pieces in pence to the one in my class who wrote the that dark little band were acceptable to the best specimen on a slate. I gave in my slate, Lord. Had her object been to win praise, she and got the sixpence, but some one else wrote would have offered the money as a gift to the the specimen for me. Yesterday you read in mission, and so have sought at the same time chapel about Zaccheus, who said, 'If I have to quiet conscience and gain credit for a taken away anything from any man, I restore liberal deed.

A. L. O. E.

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XXIII. TOWSER AND WILLIE. Y neighbour keeps a noble Newfound. immediately; don't let me have to tell you land dog. Not long since I was again.”

passing his house about mid-day, The little fellow was mending his cart, but when he came out with Towser at his heels he dropped his hammer, now that he saw and a pail in his hand. He told Towser to there was no escape, and started.

“ I always take the pail and carry it to the pump, a few have the wood to bring,” he muttered, as he rods across the way. The dog did not whine left the room. He obeyed very reluctantly. over the command, nor curl his tail and refuse He went pouting and murmuring after the to go; no, not he. He obeyed at once, took wood, and when he returned he threw it into the pail in his mouth, and away he went. the box with a violence that threatened to Faithful dog, thought I, never to refuse break it to pieces. His mother looked obedience, or wait for the second bidding. ashamed and heart-sick. I pitied her from

Then I thought of little Willie S., who said the depths of my soul. Think of it. Her son to his mother in my presence, “ No, I can't was less obedient than the dog; for the dog do it; let Ned go; he is not doing any went cheerfully, wagging his bushy tail, and thing."

lifting his head as if to say, I obey." “ Willie,” exclaimed his mother in a com- Should Towser be more obedient than manding tone, "go and bring that wood Willie.-Should I?"

66

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The Bible Mine Searched. NSWERS are not to be sent to the Editor, 3. The " head of Damascus." but will appear in each succeeding month. 4. The father of the only officer in Gilead in the

days of Solomon. SCRIPTURE QUESTIONS.

5. A queen noted in Scripture history.

6. A judge of Israel who was rich in asses. The initial letters will name one to whom a prophet confided the title-deeds of his property :

ANSWERS (see November No.) the final letters will name a prayerful prophet. 1. Paul. Acts xxv. 23, 24. 2. Simeon. Luke

1. A monarch to whom a king of Judah paid ii. 34. 3. Matt. i. 1. 4. Babylon. Isa. xiv, 4. tribute.

5. Barnabas. Acts iv. 36; xi. 22-24. 6. At 2. The Jewish king who paid the tribute.

Troas. Acts xx. 6, 7.

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