The Novelist's Magazine, Volume 13

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Harrison and Company, 1784 - English fiction
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Page 26 - half a yard round the waift.* In fpeaking thefe words, he put his handkerchief about her waift ; after which he tied it round his head, repeating thefe lines of Mr. Waller's— ' That which her flender waift confin'd ' Shall now my joyful temples bind;
Page 87 - himfelf not' only to all the infults his adverfary is pleafed to treat him with, but alfo to be branded with the infamous character of a coward by all that know him. Nothing material enough to be related happened in
Page 87 - They then fell into fome difcourfe on duelling; and Mr. Trueworth could not help joining with the ladies, in condemning the folly of that cuftom, which, contrary to the known laws of the land, and oftentimes contrary to his own
Page 87 - the ladies, in condemning the folly of that cuftom, which, contrary to the known laws of the land, and oftentimes contrary to his own reafon too, obliges the gentleman either to obey the call of the perfon who challenges him to the field, or, by
Page 114 - He then took the liberty of reminding her, that a young lady more endangered her reputation by an acquaintance of one woman of ill fame, than by receiving the vifits of twenty men, though
Page 24 - to point out either the merit of that gentleman's performances, or the motives he had for writing them, as the town is
Page 306 - but • tell me that you now are mine; I came • to make you fo by the irrevocable ties ' of love and law, and we muft now part
Page 159 - I have but one thing more to recommend to you, and that is in relation to your
Page 24 - in the repute they fmce have been, the young gentleman found fufficient to entertain him : empty as the town was, Lady Mellafin was not without company, who made frequent parties of pleafure; and when nothing elfe was to be found for recreation, cards filled up the void. Nothing, material enough to be inferted in this
Page 156 - I firft had the honour of being acquainted with you. I know very well, that it is the duty of every lover to fubmit, in all things, to the pleafure of the beautiful object, whofe chains he wears

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